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Auteur David, M.; Bailly-Comte, V.; Munaron, D.; Fiandrino, A.; Stieglitz, T.C. url  doi
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  Titre Groundwater discharge to coastal streams – A significant pathway for nitrogen inputs to a hypertrophic Mediterranean coastal lagoon Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume (down) 677 Numéro Pages 142-155  
  Mots-Clés Coastal stream; Groundwater; Lagoon; Land-sea continuum; Nitrogen; Radon  
  Résumé Near-shore and direct groundwater inputs are frequently omitted from nutrient budgets of coastal lagoons. This study investigated groundwater-driven dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) inputs from an alluvial aquifer to the hypertrophic Or lagoon, with a focus on the Salaison River. Piezometric contours revealed that the Salaison hydrogeological catchment is 42% bigger than the surface watershed and hydraulic gradients suggest significant groundwater discharge all along the stream. Hydrograph separation of the water flow at a gauging station located 3 km upstream from the Or lagoon combined with DIN historical data enabled to estimate that groundwater-driven DIN inputs account for 81–87% of the annual total DIN inputs to the stream upstream from the gauging station. A radon mass balance was performed for the hydrological cycle 2017–2018 to estimate groundwater inflow into the downstream part of the stream. Results showed that (1) DIN fluxes increased by a factor 1.1 to 2.3 between the gauging station and the Salaison outlet, (2) the increase in DIN was due to two groundwater-fed canals and to groundwater discharge along the stream, the latter represented 63–78% of the water flow. This study thus highlights the significance of groundwater driven DIN inputs into the Salaison River, which account for 90% of the annual DIN inputs. This is particularly true in the downstream part of the river, which, on averages, supplies 48% of total DIN inputs to the river. These downstream DIN inputs into the Or lagoon were previously not taken into account in the management of this and other Mediterranean lagoons. The inputs will probably affect restoration processes for many years due to their residence time in the aquifer. This study throws light on a rarely documented source of ‘very-nearshore’ groundwater discharge to coastal streams in water and nutrient budgets of coastal zone ecosystems.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2573  
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Auteur Mouton, T.L.; Matheson, F.E.; Stephenson, F.; Champion, P.D.; Wadhwa, S.; Hamer, M.P.; Catlin, A.; Riis, T. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental filtering of native and non-native stream macrophyte assemblages by habitat disturbances in an agricultural landscape Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.  
  Volume (down) 659 Numéro Pages 1370-1381  
  Mots-Clés Agricultural impacts; classification; ecological impacts; eutrophication; Functional diversity; functional diversity measures; Functional traits; land-use; management; metaanalysis; Non-native flora; restoration; RLQ and fourth-corner analyses; species traits; trait responses  
  Résumé Understanding how inter-specific variation in functional traits affects native and non-native species responses to stream disturbances, is necessary to inform management strategies, providing tools for biomonitoring, conservation and restoration. This study used a functional trait approach to characterise the responses of macrophyte assemblages to reach-scale disturbances (measured by lack of riparian shading, altered hydromorphology and eutrophication), from 97 wadeable stream sites in an agriculturally impacted region of New Zealand. To determine whether macrophyte assemblages differed due to disturbances, we examined multidimensional assemblage functional structure in relation to eleven functional traits and further related two functional diversity indices (entropy and originality) to disturbances. Macrophyte assemblages showed distinct patterns in response to disturbances, with riparian shading and hydromorphological conditions being the strongest variables shaping macrophyte functional structure. In the multidimensional space, most of the non-native species were associatedwith disturbed conditions. These species had traits allowing faster colonisation rates (higher number of reproductive organs and larger root-rhizome system) and superior competitive abilities for resources (tall and dense canopy, heterophylly and greater preferences for light and nitrogen). In addition, lack of riparian shading increased the abundance of functionally distinct species (i.e. entropy), and eutrophication resulted in the growth of functionally unique species (i.e. originality). We demonstrated that stream reach-scale habitat disturbances were associated to a dominance of more productive species, equating to a greater abundance of non-native species. This, can result in a displacement of native species, habitat alterations, and changes to higher trophic level assemblages. Our results suggests that reachscale management efforts such as the conservation and restoration of riparian vegetation that provides substantial shading and hydromorphologically diverse in-stream habitat, would have beneficial direct and indirect effects on ecosystem functioning, and contribute to the mitigation of land-use impacts. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2571  
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Auteur Lagarde, F.; Fiandrino, A.; Ubertini, M.; d'Orbcastel, E.R.; Mortreux, S.; Chiantella, C.; Bec, B.; Bonnet, D.; Roques, C.; Bernard, I.; Richard, M.; Guyondet, T.; Pouvreau, S.; Lett, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Duality of trophic supply and hydrodynamic connectivity drives spatial patterns of Pacific oyster recruitment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series  
  Volume (down) 632 Numéro Pages 81-100  
  Mots-Clés Coastal lagoon; Connectivity; Crassostrea gigas; Larval ecology; Oligotrophication; Recruitment; Settlement; Spatial patterns  
  Résumé The recent discovery of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (also known as Magallana gigas) spatfields in a Mediterranean lagoon intensely exploited for shellfish farming (Thau lagoon) revealed significant contrasts in spatial patterns of recruitment. We evaluated the processes that drive spatial patterns in oyster recruitment by comparing observed recruitment, simulated hydrodynamic connectivity and ecological variables. We hypothesized that spatial variability of recruitment depends on (1) hydrodynamic connectivity and (2) the ecology of the larval supply, settlement, metamorphosis, survival and biotic environmental parameters. We assessed recruitment at 6-8 experimental sites by larval sampling and spat collection inside and outside oyster farming areas and on an east-west gradient, from 2012-2014. Hydrodynamic connectivity was simulated using a numerical 3D transport model assessed with a Eulerian indicator. The supply of large umbo larvae did not differ significantly inside and outside oyster farming areas, whereas the supply of pediveligers to sites outside shellfish farms was structured by hydrodynamic connectivity. Inside shellfish farming zones, unfavorable conditions due to trophic competition with filter-feeders jeopardized their settlement. In this case, our results suggest loss of settlement competence by oyster larvae. This confirms our hypothesis of top-down trophic control by the oysters inside farming zones of Thau lagoon in summer that fails to meet the ecological requirements of these areas as oyster nurseries. Knowledge of oyster dispersal, connectivity and recruitment in coastal lagoons will help local development of sustainable natural spat collection. On a global scale, our method could be transposed to other basins or used for other species such as mussels, clams or scallops, to better understand the spatial patterns of bivalve recruitment. Management of the oyster industry based on natural spat collection will help develop a sustainable activity, based on locally adapted oyster strains but also by reducing the risks of transferring pathogens between basins and the global carbon footprint of this industry.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630, 1616-1599 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2673  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. doi  openurl
  Titre Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume (down) 610 Numéro Pages 51-63  
  Mots-Clés biomass; Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; competition; Density dependence; dynamics; ecosystem; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; flats; populations; seagrass; Seagrass; sediment; site; Soft-sediment habitat; variability  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2593  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series  
  Volume (down) 610 Numéro Pages 51-63  
  Mots-Clés Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; Density dependence; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; Seagrass; Soft-sediment habitat  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630, 1616-1599 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2488  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
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