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Auteur Bax, N.J.; Miloslavich, P.; Muller-Karger, F.E.; Allain, V.; Appeltans, W.; Batten, S.D.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Buttigieg, P.L.; Chiba, S.; Costa, D.P.; Duffy, J.E.; Dunn, D.C.; Johnson, C.R.; Kudela, R.M.; Obura, D.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Simmons, S.E.; Tyack, P.L. url  doi
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  Titre (up) A Response to Scientific and Societal Needs for Marine Biological Observations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés capacity development; Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Ocean observing; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); Un decade for sustainable development  
  Résumé Development of global ocean observing capacity for the biological EOVs is on the cusp of a step-change. Current capacity to automate data collection and processing and to integrate the resulting data streams with complementary data, openly available as FAIR data, is certain to dramatically increase the amount and quality of information and knowledge available to scientists and decision makers into the future. There is little doubt that scientists will continue to expand their understanding of what lives in the ocean, where it lives and how it is changing. However, whether this expanding information stream will inform policy and management or be incorporated into indicators for national reporting is more uncertain. Coordinated data collection including open sharing of data will help produce the consistent evidence-based messages that are valued by managers. The GOOS Biology and Ecosystems Panel is working with other global initiatives to assist this coordination by defining and implementing Essential Ocean Variables. The biological EOVs have been defined, are being updated following community feedback, and their implementation is underway. In 2019, the coverage and precision of a global ocean observing system capable of addressing key questions for the next decade will be quantified, and its potential to support the goals of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development identified. Developing a global ocean observing system for biology and ecosystems requires parallel efforts in improving evidence-based monitoring of progress against international agreements and the open data, reporting and governance structures that would facilitate the uptake of improved information by decision makers.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2598  
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Auteur Zhao, T.; Villeger, S.; Cucherousset, J. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Accounting for intraspecific diversity when examining relationships between non-native species and functional diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia  
  Volume 189 Numéro 1 Pages 171-183  
  Mots-Clés fish; Intraspecific variability; size; disturbance; Non-native species; phenotypic plasticity; Functional diversity; reveals; catfish silurus-glanis; coexistence; Community assembly; energy relationships; Functional traits; success; trait variability  
  Résumé Quantifying changes in functional diversity, the facet of biodiversity accounting for the biological features of organisms, has been advocated as one of the most integrative ways to unravel how communities are affected by human-induced perturbations. The present study assessed how functional diversity patterns varied among communities that differed in the degree to which non-native species dominated the community in temperate lake fish communities and whether accounting for intraspecific functional variability could provide a better understanding of the variation of functional diversity across communities. Four functional diversity indices were computed for 18 temperate lake fish communities along a gradient of non-native fish dominance using morphological functional traits assessed for each life-stage within each species. First, we showed that intraspecific variability in functional traits was high and comparable to interspecific variability. Second, we found that non-native fish were functionally distinct from native fish. Finally, we demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between functional diversity and the degree to which non-native fish currently dominated the community and that this association could be better detected when accounting for intraspecific functional variability. These findings highlighted the importance of incorporating intraspecific variability to better quantify the variation of functional diversity patterns in communities facing human-induced perturbations.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2479  
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Auteur Kadar, J.; Ladds, M.; Mourier, J.; Day, J.; Brown, C. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Acoustic accelerometry reveals diel activity patterns in premigratory Port Jackson sharks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés accelerometer; activity budgets; activity pattern; behavior; diel cycle; habitat; heterodontus-portusjacksoni; lobsters; migratory restlessness; movement; Port Jackson shark; reef sharks; regression; root mean square acceleration; vertical migrations; wild  
  Résumé Distinguishing the factors that influence activity within a species advances understanding of their behavior and ecology. Continuous observation in the marine environment is not feasible but biotelemetry devices provide an opportunity for detailed analysis of movements and activity patterns. This study investigated the detail that calibration of accelerometers measuring root mean square (RMS) acceleration with video footage can add to understanding the activity patterns of male and female Port Jackson sharks (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) in a captive environment. Linear regression was used to relate RMS acceleration output to time-matched behavior captured on video to quantify diel activity patterns. To validate captive data, diel patterns from captive sharks were compared with diel movement data from free-ranging sharks using passive acoustic tracking. The RMS acceleration data showed captive sharks exhibited nocturnal diel patterns peaking during the late evening before midnight and decreasing before sunrise. Correlation analysis revealed that captive animals displayed similar activity patterns to free-ranging sharks. The timing of wild shark departures for migration in the late breeding season corresponded with elevated diel activity at night within the captive individuals, suggesting a form of migratory restlessness in captivity. By directly relating RMS acceleration output to activity level, we show that sex, time of day, and sex-specific seasonal behavior all influenced activity levels. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that RMS acceleration data are a promising method to determine activity patterns of cryptic marine animals and can provide more detailed information when validated in captivity.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000478172800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2623  
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Auteur de Verdal, H.; O'Connell, C.M.; Mekkawy, W.; Vandeputte, M.; Chatain, B.; Begout, M.-L.; Benzie, J.A.H. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Agonistic behaviour and feed efficiency in juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture  
  Volume 505 Numéro Pages 271-279  
  Mots-Clés Agonstic behaviour; arctic charr; atlantic salmon; brain serotonergic activity; brown trout; conversion ratio; Correlation; dominance relationships; Feed efficiency; food acquisition; genetic-improvement; Nile tilapia; Performances; salvelinus-alpinus; social-status  
  Résumé Given the strong effects of behavioural hierarchies on growth in many cultured species and the key role of feed efficiency in aquaculture economics, understanding the nature of the interaction of these variables is important for the sustainability of aquaculture. The relationship between agonistic behaviour, growth and feed efficiency in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was studied by rearing 120 fish in eight aquaria. Fish were video-recorded to estimate the occurrence of agonistic behaviour during a fasting and a refeeding period. Growth, feed intake and feed conversion efficiency (FCE – calculated as the inverse of feed conversion ratio (FCR)) were subsequently measured individually for each fish. Fish showed 58% less agonistic traits during the fasting period compared to the feeding period, but generally, an aggressive fish during the fasting period was also aggressive during the refeeding period. The nature of agonistic behaviours between individuals was used to assess the presence of hierarchical relationships between fish. There were dominance hierarchies established in each experimental aquarium that despite minor shifts were maintained throughout the experiment. Agonistic behaviours were strongly correlated with each other, the aggression Index (AI) and with hierarchy rank. PCA analysis of the agonistic behaviours summarising the behavioural information showed little or no correlation between agonistic behaviour, fish growth or FCE. FCE was correlated with body weight gain (BWG). These results suggest that agonistic interactions in juvenile Nile tilapia do not have a large impact on growth and feed conversion efficiency.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2583  
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Auteur Chao, A.; Chiu, C.-H.; Villeger, S.; Sun, I.-F.; Thorn, S.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chiang, J.-M.; Sherwin, W.B. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) An attribute-diversity approach to functional diversity, functional beta diversity, and related (dis)similarity measures Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Monogr.  
  Volume 89 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-e01343  
  Mots-Clés attribute diversity; biodiversity; biological diversity; consensus; conservation; differentiation measures; diversity decomposition; evenness; framework; functional (dis)similarity; functional beta diversity; functional diversity; Hill numbers; phylogenetic diversity; quadratic entropy; similarity; species diversity; species richness; species traits; trait diversity  
  Résumé Based on the framework of attribute diversity (a generalization of Hill numbers of order q), we develop a class of functional diversity measures sensitive not only to species abundances but also to trait-based species-pairwise functional distances. The new method refines and improves on the conventional species-equivalent approach in three areas: (1) the conventional method often gives similar values (close to unity) to assemblages with contrasting levels of functional diversity; (2) when a distance metric is unbounded, the conventional functional diversity depends on the presence/absence of other assemblages in the study; (3) in partitioning functional gamma diversity into alpha and beta components, the conventional gamma is sometimes less than alpha. To resolve these issues, we add to the attribute-diversity framework a novel concept: tau, the threshold of functional distinctiveness between any two species; here, tau can be chosen to be any positive value. Any two species with functional distance >= tau are treated as functionally equally distinct. Our functional diversity quantifies the effective number of functionally equally distinct species (or “virtual functional groups”) with all pairwise distances at least tau for different species pairs. We advocate the use of two complementary diversity profiles (tau profile and q profile), which depict functional diversity with varying levels of tau and q, respectively. Both the conventional species-equivalent method (i.e., tau is the maximum of species-pairwise distances) and classic taxonomic diversity (i.e., tau is the minimum of non-zero species-pairwise distances) are incorporated into our proposed tau profile for an assemblage. For any type of species-pairwise distance matrices, our attribute-diversity approach allows proper diversity partitioning, with the desired property gamma >= alpha and thus avoids all the restrictions that apply to the conventional diversity decomposition. Our functional alpha and gamma are interpreted as the effective numbers of functionally equally distinct species, respectively, in an assemblage and in the pooled assemblage, while beta is the effective number of equally large assemblages with no shared species and all species in the assemblages being equally distinct. The resulting beta diversity can be transformed to obtain abundance-sensitive Sorensen- and Jaccard-type functional (dis)similarity profiles. Hypothetical and real examples are used to illustrate the framework. Online software and R codes are available to facilitate computations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9615 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000477640700001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2620  
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