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Auteur (up) Bitetto, I.; Romagnoni, G.; Adamidou, A.; Certain, G.; Di Lorenzo, M.; Donnaloia, M.; Lembo, G.; Maiorano, P.; Milisenda, G.; Musumeci, C.; Ordines, F.; Pesci, P.; Peristeraki, P.; Pesic, A.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T. doi  openurl
  Titre Modelling spatio-temporal patterns of fish community size structure across the northern Mediterranean Sea: an analysis combining MEDITS survey data with environmental and anthropogenic drivers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Mar.  
  Volume 83 Numéro Pages 141-151  
  Mots-Clés demersal fish community; dynamic factor analysis; ecological indicators; geographical sub-area; impact; management; marine; Marine Strategy Framework Directive; redundancy analysis; size structure indicators; specificity; trends  
  Résumé The state of marine systems subject to natural or anthropogenic impacts can be generally summarized by suites of ecological indicators carefully selected to avoid redundancy. Length-based indicators capture the status of fish community structure, fulfilling the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) requirement for Descriptor 3 (status of commercial fish species). Although the MSFD recommends the development of regional indicators, a comparison among alternative length-based indicators is so far missing for the Mediterranean Sea. Using principal component analysis and dynamic factor analysis, we identified the most effective subset of length-based indicators, whether or not based on maximum length. Indicator trends and lime series of fishing effort and environmental variables are also compared in order to highlight the individual and combined capability of indicators to track system changes across geographical sub-areas. Two indicators, typical length and mean maximum length, constitute the smallest set of non-redundant indicators, capturing together 87.45% of variability. Only in combination can these indicators disentangle changes in the fish community composition from modifications of size structure. Our study supports the inclusion of typical length among the regional MSFD Descriptor 3 indicators for the Mediterranean Sea. Finally, we show dissimilarity between the western and eastern-central Mediterranean, suggesting that there are sub-regional differences in stressors and community responses.  
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  ISSN 0214-8358 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000504829900011 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2696  
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Auteur (up) Blondeau-Bidet, E.; Hiroi, J.; Lorin-Nebel, C. url  doi
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  Titre Ion uptake pathways in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Gene  
  Volume 692 Numéro Pages 126-137  
  Mots-Clés Ion transporters; Na uptake; Ncc2; Nhe3; Osmoregulation; Teleost  
  Résumé Ion uptake mechanisms are diverse in fish species, certainly linked to duplication events that have led to the presence of a multitude of paralogous genes. In fish, Na+ uptake involves several ion transporters expressed in different ionocyte subtypes. In the European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax, several key transporters potentially involved in Na+ uptake have been investigated in seawater (SW) and following a 2 weeks freshwater (FW) acclimation. Using gel electrophoresis, we have shown that the Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (nhe3, slc9a3) is expressed in gills and kidney at both salinities. Quantitative realtime PCR analysis showed a significantly higher nhe3 expression in fresh water (FW) compared to SW. Its apical localization in a subset of gill ionocytes in freshwater-acclimated fish supports the role of NHE3 in Na+ uptake. Interestingly, NHE3-immunopositive cells also express basolateral Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) and are mainly localized in gill lamella. Among the three nhe2 (slc9a2) paralogs, only nhe2c shows differential branchial expression levels with higher mRNA levels in SW than in FW. The increased branchial expression of the ammonia transporter rhcg1 (Rhesus protein), nhe3 and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase (cac) in FW could indicate the presence of a functional coupling between ion transporters to form a Na+/NH4+ exchange complex. Acid-sensing ion channel 4 (asic4) seems not to be expressed in sea bass gills. Na+/Cl- cotransporter (ncc2a or ncc-like) is about three times more expressed in FW compared to SW suggesting coupled Na+ and Cl− uptake in a subset of gill ionocytes. Besides the main pump Na+/K+-ATPase, branchial NCC2a and NHE3 may be key players in ion uptake in sea bass following a long-term freshwater challenge.  
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  ISSN 0378-1119 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2504  
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Auteur (up) Boavida, J.; Becheler, R.; Choquet, M.; Frank, N.; Taviani, M.; Bourillet, J.-F.; Meistertzheim, A.-L.; Grehan, A.; Savini, A.; Arnaud-Haond, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Out of the Mediterranean? Post-glacial colonization pathways varied among cold-water coral species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 46 Numéro 5 Pages 915-931  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; cold-water corals; computer-program; deep-sea; deep-sea corals; genetic-structure; glacial marine refugia; glacial refugia; growth; in-situ; Last Glacial Maximum; Lophelia pertusa; lophelia-pertusa; Madrepora oculata; marine phylogeography; north-atlantic ocean; software  
  Résumé Aim: To infer cold-water corals' (CWC) post-glacial phylogeography and assess the role of Mediterranean Sea glacial refugia as origins for the recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Location: Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Taxon: Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata. Methods: We sampled CWC using remotely operated vehicles and one sediment core for coral and sediment dating. We characterized spatial genetic patterns (microsatellites and a nuclear gene fragment) using networks, clustering and measures of genetic differentiation. Results: Inferences from microsatellite and sequence data were congruent, and showed a contrast between the two CWC species. Populations of L. pertusa present a dominant pioneer haplotype, local haplotype radiations and a majority of endemic variation in lower latitudes. Madrepora oculata populations are differentiated across the northeastern Atlantic and genetic lineages are poorly admixed even among neighbouring sites. Conclusions: Our study shows contrasting post-glacial colonization pathways for two key habitat-forming species in the deep sea. The CWC L. pertusa has likely undertaken a long-range (post-glacial) recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic directly from refugia located along southern Europe (Mediterranean Sea or Gulf of Cadiz). In contrast, the stronger genetic differentiation of M. oculata populations mirrors the effects of long-term isolation in multiple refugia. We suggest that the distinct and genetically divergent, refugial populations initiated the post-glacial recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic margins, leading to a secondary contact in the northern range and reaching higher latitudes much later, in the late Holocene. This study highlights the need to disentangle the influences of present-day dispersal and evolutionary processes on the distribution of genetic polymorphisms, to unravel the influence of past and future environmental changes on the connectivity of cosmopolitan deep-sea ecosystems associated with CWC.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000471344900007 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2602  
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Auteur (up) Bonnin, L.; Robbins, W.D.; Boussarie, G.; Kiszka, J.J.; Dagorn, L.; Mouillot, D.; Vigliola, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Repeated long-range migrations of adult males in a common Indo-Pacific reef shark Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés carcharhinus-amblyrhynchos; carcharias; fidelity; Male-biased dispersal; Migration; movements; New Caledonia; patterns; philopatry; population; Reef shark; residency; site; Telemetry; white sharks  
  Résumé The grey reef shark, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, is one of the most abundant coral reef sharks throughout the Indo-Pacific. However, this species has been critically impacted across its range, with well-documented population declines of > 90% attributed to human activities. A key knowledge gap in the successful implementation of grey reef shark conservation plans is the understanding of large-scale movement patterns, along with the associated biological and ecological drivers. To address this shortfall, we acoustically monitored 147 adult and juvenile grey reef sharks of all sexes for more than 2 yr across the New Caledonian archipelago, West Pacific. Here, we document multiple adult males undertaking return journeys of up to nearly 700 km in consecutive years. This constitutes the first evidence of repeated long-range migrations for this species. Although only a limited number of adult males were definitively tracked undertaking migrations, similar timing in changes in the detection patterns of a further 13 animals, mostly adult males, suggests this behavior may be more common than previously thought. The paucity of evidence for juvenile migrations and timing of adult movements suggest that mating is the motivation behind these migrations. Our results have important implications for management, given the potential of mature individuals to recurrently travel outside managed or protected areas. Future management of this species clearly needs to consider the importance of large-scale migratory behaviors when developing management plans.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496832900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2670  
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Auteur (up) Bonola, M.; Girondot, M.; Robin, J.-P.; Martin, J.; Siegwalt, F.; Jeantet, L.; Lelong, P.; Grand, C.; Chambault, P.; Etienne, D.; Gresser, J.; Hielard, G.; Arque, A.; Regis, S.; Lecerf, N.; Frouin, C.; Lefebvre, F.; Sutter, E.; Vedie, F.; Barnerias, C.; Thieulle, L.; Bordes, R.; Guimera, C.; Aubert, N.; Bouaziz, M.; Pinson, A.; Flora, F.; Duru, M.; Benhalilou, A.; Murgale, C.; Maillet, T.; Andreani, L.; Campistron, G.; Sikora, M.; Rateau, F.; George, F.; Eggenspieler, J.; Woignier, T.; Allenou, J.-P.; Louis-Jean, L.; Chanteur, B.; Beranger, C.; Crillon, J.; Brador, A.; Habold, C.; Maho, Y.L.; Chevallier, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Fine scale geographic residence and annual primary production drive body condition of wild immature green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Martinique Island (Lesser Antilles) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Open  
  Volume 8 Numéro 12 Pages bio048058  
  Mots-Clés abundance; Biometry; Body condition; Body mass; condition indexes; fitness; Green turtles; growth-rates; Juveniles; length-weight relationships; mass; patterns; regressions; sea-turtles; size  
  Résumé The change of animal biometrics (body mass and body size) can reveal important information about their living environment as well as determine the survival potential and reproductive success of individuals and thus the persistence of populations. However, weighing individuals like marine turtles in the field presents important logistical difficulties. In this context, estimating body mass (BM) based on body size is a crucial issue. Furthermore, the determinants of the variability of the parameters for this relationship can provide information about the quality of the environment and the manner in which individuals exploit the available resources. This is of particular importance in young individuals where growth quality might be a determinant of adult fitness. Our study aimed to validate the use of different body measurements to estimate BM, which can be difficult to obtain in the field, and explore the determinants of the relationship between BM and size in juvenile green turtles. Juvenile green turtles were caught, measured, and weighed over 6 years (2011 2012; 2015 2018) at six bays to the west of Martinique Island (Lesser Antilles). Using different datasets from this global database, we were able to show that the BM of individuals can be predicted from body measurements with an error of less than 2%. We built several datasets including different morphological and time-location information to test the accuracy of the mass prediction. We show a yearly and north – south pattern for the relationship between BM and body measurements. The year effect for the relationship of BM and size is strongly correlated with net primary production but not with sea surface temperature or cyclonic events. We also found that if the bay locations and year effects were removed from the analysis, the mass prediction degraded slightly but was still less than 3% on average. Further investigations of the feeding habitats in Martinique turtles are still needed to better understand these effects and to link them with geographic and oceanographic conditions.  
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  ISSN 2046-6390 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000506171400016 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2697  
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