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Auteur (up) Alfonso, S.; Blanc, M.; Joassard, L.; Keiter, S.H.; Munschy, C.; Loizeau, V.; Begout, M.-L.; Cousin, X. doi  openurl
  Titre Examining multi- and transgenerational behavioral and molecular alterations resulting from parental exposure to an environmental PCB and PBDE mixture Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Toxicol.  
  Volume 208 Numéro Pages 29-38  
  Mots-Clés adult zebrafish; Behavior; brominated flame retardants; developmental exposure; dietary-exposure; embryonic exposure; Epigenetic; Gene transcription; global dna methylation; left-right asymmetry; Offspring; Parental exposure; polybrominated diphenyl ethers; polychlorinated-biphenyls pcbs; Zebrafish; zebrafish danio-rerio  
  Résumé Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent organic pollutants extensively used during the 20th century and still present in aquatic environments despite their ban. Effects of exposure to these compounds over generations are poorly documented. Therefore, our aims were to characterize behavioral responses and underlying molecular mechanisms in zebrafish exposed to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs and PBDEs as well as in four unexposed offspring generations. Zebrafish (F0) were chronically exposed from the first meal onward to a diet spiked with a mixture containing 22 PCB and 7 PBDE congeners in proportions and concentrations reflecting environmental situations (Sigma PCBs = 1991 and Sigma PBDEs = 411 ng/g). Four offspring generations (F1 to F4) were obtained from this F0 and were not further exposed. Behavior was assessed at both larval and adult stages. Mechanisms related to behavioral defects (habenula maturation and c-fos transcription) and methylation (dnmts transcription) were monitored in larvae. Exposed adult F0 as well as F1 and F3 adults displayed no behavioral change while F2 expressed anxiety-like behavior. Larval behavior was also disrupted, Le. hyperactive after light to dark transition in F1 or hypoactive in F2, F3 and F4. Behavioral disruptions may be related to defect in habenula maturation (observed in F1) and change in c-fos transcription (observed in F1 and F2). Transcription of the gene encoding DNA methyltransferase (dnmt3ba) was also modified in all generations. Our results lead us to hypothesize that chronic dietary exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCB and PBDE triggers multigenerational and transgenerational molecular and behavioral disruptions in a vertebrate model.  
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  ISSN 0166-445x ISBN Médium  
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Auteur (up) Alfonso, S.; Sadoul, B.; Gesto, M.; Joassard, L.; Chatain, B.; Geffroy, B.; Bégout, M.-L. url  doi
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  Titre Coping styles in European sea bass: The link between boldness, stress response and neurogenesis Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Physiology & Behavior  
  Volume 207 Numéro Pages 76-85  
  Mots-Clés Gene transcription; HPI axis; Neurotransmitters; Personality  
  Résumé Coping styles consist of a coherent set of individual physiological and behavioral differences in stress responses that are consistent across time and context. Such consistent inter-individual differences in behavior have already been shown in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), but the associated mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we combine physiological measurements with individual behavioral responses in order to characterize coping styles in fish. Fish were tagged and placed in a tank for group risk-taking tests (GRT) at 8 months of age to evaluate boldness using the proxy latency of leaving a sheltered area towards an open area. A subsample of these fish were individually challenged 16 months later using an open field test (OFT), in which the boldness was assessed after being placed in a shelter within an open arena. Latency to exit the shelter, time spent in the shelter, and distance travelled were recorded for this purpose. The blood and brain were then collected to evaluate plasma cortisol concentration and neurotransmitter levels (dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and related metabolites), as well as brain transcription of key genes involved in stress axis regulation (gr1, gr2, mr, crf), neurogenesis (neurod1, neurod2, pcna), and neuronal development (egr1). Fish acting bolder in the GRT were not necessarily those acting bolder in the OFT, highlighting the relatively low consistency across different types of tests performed with a 16-months interval. There was, however, a significant correlation between stress markers and boldness. Indeed, mRNA levels of mr, crf, gr2, egr1, and neurod2, as well as norepinephrine levels were higher in shy than bold fish, whereas brain serotonergic activity was lower in shy fish. Overall, our study highlights the fact that boldness was not consistent over time when testing context differed (group vs. alone). This is in agreement with previous literature suggesting that social context play a key role in boldness measurement and that the particular life history of each individual may account in shaping the personality fate of a fish.  
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  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2575  
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Auteur (up) Almoussawi, A.; Lenoir, J.; Jamoneau, A.; Hattab, T.; Wasof, S.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Spicher, F.; Kobaissi, A.; Decocq, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Forest fragmentation shapes the alpha-gamma relationship in plant diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés agricultural landscapes; alpha diversity; anthropogenic disturbances; assemblages; community assembly; community patterns; competition; connectivity; dispersal limitations; gamma diversity; habitat conservation strategies; habitat fragmentation; local-regional richness relationship; metacommunity dynamics; regional species richness; relative importance; saturation; specialists; succession  
  Résumé Questions Forest fragmentation affects biodiversity locally (alpha diversity) and beyond – at relatively larger scales (gamma diversity) – by increasing dispersal and recruitment limitations. Yet, does an increase in fragmentation affect the relationship between alpha and gamma diversity and what can we learn from it? Location Northern France. Methods We surveyed 116 forest patches across three fragmentation levels: none (continuous forest); intermediate (forest patches connected by hedgerows); and high (isolated forest patches). Plant species richness of both forest specialists and generalists was surveyed at five nested spatial resolutions across each forest patch: 1 m(2); 10 m(2); 100 m(2); 1,000 m(2); and total forest patch area. First, we ran log-ratio models to quantify the alpha-gamma relationship. We did that separately for all possible combinations of fragmentation level (none vs intermediate vs high) x spatial scale (e.g., alpha-1 m(2) vs gamma-10 m(2)) x species type (e.g., alpha-specialists vs gamma-specialists). We then used linear mixed-effects models to analyze the effect of fragmentation level, spatial scale, species type and all two-way interaction terms on the slope coefficient extracted from all log-ratio models. Results We found an interaction effect between fragmentation level and species type, such that forest specialists shifted from a linear (i.e., proportional sampling) to a curvilinear plateau (i.e., community saturation) relationship at low and high fragmentation, respectively, while generalists shifted from a curvilinear to a linear pattern. Conclusions The impact of forest fragmentation on the alpha-gamma relationship supports generalist species persistence over forest specialists, with contrasting mechanisms for these two guilds. As fragmentation increases, forest specialists shift from proportional sampling towards community saturation, thus reducing alpha diversity likely due to dispersal limitation. Contrariwise, generalists shift from community saturation towards proportional sampling, thus increasing alpha diversity likely due to an increase in the edge:core ratio. To ensure long-term conservation of forest specialists, one single large forest patch should be preferred over several small ones.  
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  ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2676  
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Auteur (up) Alves-Junior, F. de A.; Bertrand, A.; Camara de Araujo, M. de A.L.; de Carvalho Paiva, R.J.; de Souza-Filho, J.F. doi  openurl
  Titre First Report of the Ectoparasitic Isopod, Holophryxus acanthephyrae Stephensen 1912 (Cymothoida: Dajidae) in the South Atlantic: Recovered from a New Host, the Deep-Sea Shrimp, Acanthephyra acanthitelsonis Spence Bate, 1888 Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Thalassas  
  Volume 35 Numéro 1 Pages 13-15  
  Mots-Clés Brazilian waters; Deep-sea shrimp; epicaridea; genus; Isopods; Parasitism; Rocas Atoll  
  Résumé The crustacean family of isopods, Dajidae, comprises 18 genera containing 54 species with widespread distribution. The species of this family are ectoparasites, especially on euphausiids, mysids and shrimps. The species of Holophryxus acanthephyrae has a life cycle involving a first intermediate host (copepod) and a definitive host (shrimp), and adheres particularly on deep-sea shrimps of genus Acanthephyra. Here, we make the first report of dajid isopod Holophryxus acanthephyrae from Brazilian waters (South Atlantic) and the first occurrence as parasite on deep-sea shrimp Acanthephyra acanthitelsonis. The specimen was collected under the framework of the project ABRACOS 2 (Acoustic along the BRazilian COast), on board of R/V Antea in April 2017, using a Micronekton net (mesh size of 10mm) in Rocas Atoll. The specimen female of Holophryxus acanthephyrae was found in pelagic zone in Rocas Atoll, at 630m depth. This study increases the knowledge on Dajidae family and their host range.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0212-5919 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2581  
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Auteur (up) Alves-Júnior, F.D.A.; Silva, E.D.S.; Araújo, M.D.S.L.C.D.; Cardoso, I.; Bertrand, A.; Souza-Filho, J.F. url  doi
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  Titre Taxonomy of deep-sea shrimps of the Superfamily Oplophoroidea Dana 1852 (Decapoda: Caridea) from Southwestern Atlantic Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Zootaxa  
  Volume 4613 Numéro 3 Pages 401-442  
  Mots-Clés Crustacea; Acanthephyridae; New Records; bathypelagic shrimps; deep waters; deep-sea biodiversity; Northeastern Brazil; Oplophoridae  
  Résumé In this paper, we provide some available information about the occurrence and some taxonomic aspects of 19 species from the Superfamily Oplophoroidea in the southwestern Atlantic (Brazilian waters), with the update to 22 species of Oplophoroidea occurring in Brazilian waters. Samples were collected during two sets of surveys. The first was performed in 2009 and 2011 in the Potiguar Basin in northeast of Brazil (03–05°S; 38–35°W; between the States of Ceará and Rio Grande do Norte) under the framework of the project “Avaliação da biota bentônica e planctônica da Bacia Potiguar e Ceará (Bpot)”, with samples collected from bottom trawls in the continental slope at depth ranging from 150–2068 m. Second, under the in the framework of the ABRACOS (Acoustic along the Brazilian coast), performed in 2015 and 2017 on seamounts and offshore areas in Northeast Brazil (Ceará Chain, Rio Grande do Norte and Rocas Atoll, Fernando de Noronha Archipelago and Pernambuco State), with samples with pelagic micronekton and mesopelagic nets, in depths ranging from 50–1260 m. We highlight the occurrence of 14 species of the family Acanthephyridae and 5 species of the family Oplophoridae, including the first occurrences of five species to Brazilian deep waters: Acanthephyra kingsleyi Spence Bate, 1888, Ephyrina ombango Crosnier & Forest, 1973, Meningodora compsa (Chace, 1940), M. longisulca Kikuchi, 1985 and Systellapsis curvispina Crosnier, 1987. These records increase the knowledge on deep-sea shrimps occurring in Southwestern Atlantic.  
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  ISSN 1175-5334 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2584  
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