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Auteur Espinoza, P.; Lorrain, A.; Ménard, F.; Cherel, Y.; Tremblay-Boyer, L.; Argüelles, J.; Tafur, R.; Bertrand, S.; Tremblay, Y.; Ayón, P.; Munaron, J.-M.; Richard, P.; Bertrand, A. url  doi
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  Titre Trophic structure in the northern Humboldt Current system: new perspectives from stable isotope analysis Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol  
  Volume 164 Numéro 4 Pages 86  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé The northern Humboldt Current system (NHCS) is the most productive eastern boundary upwelling system (EBUS) in terms of fish productivity despite having a moderate primary production compared with other EBUS. To understand this apparent paradox, an updated vision of the trophic relationships in the NHCS is required. Using δ13C and δ15N as a proxy of foraging habitat and trophic position, respectively, we focused on thirteen relevant taxonomic groups from zooplankton to air-breathing top predators collected off Peru from 2008 to 2011. Estimates of trophic position (TP) for the anchoveta Engraulis ringens were high (3.4–3.7), in accordance with previous studies showing zooplankton as a major contributor to anchoveta diet and challenging the often-cited short food chain hypothesis for this ecosystem. The squat lobster, Pleuroncodes monodon, a little studied consumer had similar δ15N values that of anchoveta, and thus similar trophic position. However, their differing δ13C values indicate that their foraging habitat do not fully overlap, which could alleviate potential competition between these species. Given the current high biomass of squat lobsters in the ecosystem, we encourage that future research focus on this species and its role in the diet of top predators. The present study provides first estimates of the relative TP of important taxonomic groups in the NHCS, which are needed to revisit anchoveta-centred ecosystem models for this region. Further work using amino acid compound specific stable isotope analyses is now required to confirm these TP estimates.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2092  
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Auteur Fiandrino, A.; Ouisse, V.; Dumas, F.; Lagarde, F.; Pete, R.; Malet, N.; Le Noc, S.; de Wit, R. doi  openurl
  Titre Spatial patterns in coastal lagoons related to the hydrodynamics of seawater intrusion Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Pollut. Bull.  
  Volume 119 Numéro 1 Pages 132-144  
  Mots-Clés bay; confinement; estuary; Hydromorphological zonations; Mediterranean coastal lagoons; Mixing efficiency; model performance; Numerical model; sparus-aurata; Transport timescale; transport time scales; ulva rigida; venice lagoon; Water renewal; water renewal timescales; wind-driven circulation  
  Résumé Marine intrusion was simulated in a choked and in a restricted coastal lagoon by using a 3D-hydrodynamic model. To study the spatiotemporal progression of seawater intrusion and its mixing efficiency with lagoon waters we define Marine Mixed Volume (V-MM) as a new hydrodynamic indicator. Spatial patterns in both lagoons were described by studying the time series and maps of VMM taking into account the meteorological conditions encountered during a water year. The patterns comprised well-mixed zones (WMZ) and physical barrier zones (PBZ) that act as hydrodynamic boundaries. The choked Bages-Sigean lagoon comprises four sub-basins: a PBZ at the inlet, and two WMZ's separated by another PBZ corresponding to a constriction zone. The volumes of the PBZ were 2.1 and 5.4 millions m(3) with characteristic mixing timescale of 68 and 84 days, respectively. The WMZ were 123 and 433 millions m(3) with characteristics mixing timescale of 70 and 39 days, respectively. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2181  
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Auteur Le Pape, O.; Bonhommeau, S.; Nieblas, A.-E.; Fromentin, J.-M. doi  openurl
  Titre Overfishing causes frequent fish population collapses but rare extinctions Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.  
  Volume 114 Numéro 31 Pages E6274-E6274  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0027-8424 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2196  
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Auteur Roberts, C.M.; O’Leary, B.C.; McCauley, D.J.; Cury, P.M.; Duarte, C.M.; Lubchenco, J.; Pauly, D.; Sáenz-Arroyo, A.; Sumaila, U.R.; Wilson, R.W.; Worm, B.; Castilla, J.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Marine reserves can mitigate and promote adaptation to climate change Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Pnas  
  Volume 114 Numéro 24 Pages 6167-6175  
  Mots-Clés ecological insurance; global change; Marine Protected Areas; Mpa; nature-based solution  
  Résumé Strong decreases in greenhouse gas emissions are required to meet the reduction trajectory resolved within the 2015 Paris Agreement. However, even these decreases will not avert serious stress and damage to life on Earth, and additional steps are needed to boost the resilience of ecosystems, safeguard their wildlife, and protect their capacity to supply vital goods and services. We discuss how well-managed marine reserves may help marine ecosystems and people adapt to five prominent impacts of climate change: acidification, sea-level rise, intensification of storms, shifts in species distribution, and decreased productivity and oxygen availability, as well as their cumulative effects. We explore the role of managed ecosystems in mitigating climate change by promoting carbon sequestration and storage and by buffering against uncertainty in management, environmental fluctuations, directional change, and extreme events. We highlight both strengths and limitations and conclude that marine reserves are a viable low-tech, cost-effective adaptation strategy that would yield multiple cobenefits from local to global scales, improving the outlook for the environment and people into the future.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2144  
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Auteur Massol, F.; Altermatt, F.; Gounand, I.; Gravel, D.; Leibold, M.A.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre How life-history traits affect ecosystem properties: effects of dispersal in meta-ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Oikos  
  Volume 126 Numéro 4 Pages 532-546  
  Mots-Clés colonization trade-off; ecological stoichiometry; interaction strengths; neutral metacommunities; pond metacommunities; predator-prey interactions; source-sink metacommunities; species-diversity; terrestrial food webs; theoretical framework  
  Résumé The concept of life-history traits and the study of these traits are the hallmark of population biology. Acknowledging their variability and evolution has allowed us to understand how species adapt in response to their environment. The same traits are also involved in how species alter ecosystems and shape their dynamics and functioning. Some theories, such as the metabolic theory of ecology, ecological stoichiometry or pace-of-life theory, already recognize this junction, but only do so in an implicitly non-spatial context. Meanwhile, for a decade now, it has been argued that ecosystem properties have to be understood at a larger scale using meta-ecosystem theory because source-sink dynamics, community assembly and ecosystem stability are all modified by spatial structure. Here, we argue that some ecosystem properties can be linked to a single life-history trait, dispersal, i.e. the tendency of organisms to live, compete and reproduce away from their birth place. By articulating recent theoretical and empirical studies linking ecosystem functioning and dynamics to species dispersal, we aim to highlight both the known connections between life-history traits and ecosystem properties and the unknown areas, which deserve further empirical and theoretical developments.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0030-1299 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2120  
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