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Auteur (up) Alves-Júnior, F. de A.; Correia, É.P.; Figueirêdo, L.G.P.; Cunha, A.G. da; Bertrand, A.; Neumann-Leitão, S.; Alves-Júnior, F. de A.; Correia, É.P.; Figueirêdo, L.G.P.; Cunha, A.G. da; Bertrand, A.; Neumann-Leitão, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre First report of deep-sea copepod Megacalanus princeps Wolfenden, 1904 (Calanoidea: Megacalanidae) from southwestern Atlantic Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nauplius  
  Volume 25 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé AbstractThe deep-sea copepod Megacalanus princeps Wolfenden, 1904 was previously recorded from the northern and southeastern Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans, but not previously observed from southwestern Atlantic. Here we report its first occurrence in Brazilian waters. The current record increases the knowledge on the species distribution and on the deep-sea copepod fauna in the south Atlantic.Key words Geographic distribution; mesopelagic; northeastern Brazil; Calanoida  
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  ISSN 0104-6497 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2197  
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Auteur (up) Andrello, M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Parravicini, V.; Scholtens, J.; Verley, P.; Barange, M.; Sumaila, U.R.; Manel, S.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 16039  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; Connectivity; dispersal; fisheries management; impacts; Populations; protected areas; reef fishes; world  
  Résumé Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2162  
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Auteur (up) Arnaud-Haond, S.; Aires, T.; Candeias, R.; Teixeira, S.J.L.; Duarte, C.M.; Valero, M.; Serrao, E.A. doi  openurl
  Titre Entangled fates of holobiont genomes during invasion: nested bacterial and host diversities in Caulerpa taxifolia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 8 Pages 2379-2391  
  Mots-Clés Algae; australia; Caulerpa; Chlorophyta; clonal diversity; dna; endophytic communities; genetic diversity; holobiont; invasion paradox; marine invasion; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; parasites; plant invasions; polymorphism  
  Résumé Successful prevention and mitigation of biological invasions requires retracing the initial steps of introduction, as well as understanding key elements enhancing the adaptability of invasive species. We studied the genetic diversity of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and its associated bacterial communities in several areas around the world. The striking congruence of alpha and beta diversity of the algal genome and endophytic communities reveals a tight association, supporting the holobiont concept as best describing the unit of spreading and invasion. Both genomic compartments support the hypotheses of a unique accidental introduction in the Mediterranean and of multiple invasion events in southern Australia. In addition to helping with tracing the origin of invasion, bacterial communities exhibit metabolic functions that can potentially enhance adaptability and competitiveness of the consortium they form with their host. We thus hypothesize that low genetic diversities of both host and symbiont communities may contribute to the recent regression in the Mediterranean, in contrast with the persistence of highly diverse assemblages in southern Australia. This study supports the importance of scaling up from the host to the holobiont for a comprehensive understanding of invasions.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2143  
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Auteur (up) Arnaud-Haond, S.; van den Beld, I.M.J.; Becheler, R.; Orejas, C.; Menot, L.; Frank, N.; Grehan, A.; Bourillet, J.F. doi  openurl
  Titre Two “pillars” of cold-water coral reefs along Atlantic European margins: Prevalent association of Madrepora oculata with Lophelia pertusa, from reef to colony scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 145 Numéro Pages 110-119  
  Mots-Clés community; bay; Bay of Biscay; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; biscay; mediterranean sea; Cold water corals (CWC); deep-sea corals; False-chimaera colonies; fleuve manche; hydrodynamics; Iceland; Ireland; megafauna; mid-norway; ne atlantic  
  Résumé The scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa has been the focus of deep-sea research since the recognition of the vast extent of coral reefs in North Atlantic waters two decades ago, long after their existence was mentioned by fishermen. These reefs where shown to provide habitat, concentrate biomass and act as feeding or nursery grounds for many species, including those targeted by commercial fisheries. Thus, the attention given to this cold-water coral (CWC) species from researchers and the wider public has increased. Consequently, new research programs triggered research to determine the full extent of the corals geographic distribution and ecological dynamics of “Lophelia reefs”. The present study is based on a systematic standardised sampling design to analyze the distribution and coverage of CWC reefs along European margins from the Bay of Biscay to Iceland. Based on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) image analysis, we report an almost systematic occurrence of Madrepora oculata in association with L. pertusa with similar abundances of both species within explored reefs, despite a tendency of increased abundance of L. pertusa compared to M. oculata toward higher latitudes. This systematic association occasionally reached the colony scale, with “twin” colonies of both species often observed growing next to each other when isolated structures were occurring offireefs. Finally, several “false chimaera” were observed within reefs, confirming that colonial structures can be “coral bushes” formed by an accumulation of multiple colonies even at the inter-specific scale, with no need for self-recognition mechanisms. Thus, we underline the importance of the hitherto underexplored M. oculata in the Eastern Atlantic, reestablishing a more balanced view that both species and their yet unknown interactions are required to better elucidate the ecology, dynamics and fate of European CWC reefs in a changing environment.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2256  
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Auteur (up) Assali, C.; Bez, N.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
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  Titre Seabird distribution patterns observed with fishing vessel’s radar reveal previously undescribed sub-meso-scale clusters Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Scientific Reports  
  Volume 7 Numéro 1 Pages 7364  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé Seabirds are known to concentrate on prey patches or at predators aggregations standing for potential feeding opportunities. They may search for prey using olfaction or by detecting visually feeding con-specifics and sub-surface predators, or even boats. Thus, they might form a foraging network. We hypothesized that conditionally to the existence of a foraging network, the visual detection ability of seabirds should have a bearing on their medium-scale distribution at sea. Using a fishing-boat radar to catch the instantaneous distribution of seabirds groups within 30 km around the vessel, we conducted a spatial clustering of the seabird-echoes. We found 7,657 clusters (i.e. aggregations of echoes), lasting less than 15 minutes and measuring 9.2 km in maximum length (median). Distances between seabirds groups within clusters showed little variation (median: 2.1 km; CV: 0.5), while area varied largely (median: 21.9 km2; CV: 0.8). Given existing data on seabirds’ reaction distances to boats or other marine predators, we suggest that these structures may represent active foraging sequences of seabirds spreading themselves in space such as to possibly cue on each others. These seabird clusters were not previously described and are size compatible with the existence of a foraging network.  
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  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2182  
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