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Auteur (down) Torres-Irineo, E.; Dreyfus-Leon, M.; Gaertner, D.; Salas, S.; Marchal, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Adaptive responses of tropical tuna purse-seiners under temporal regulations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ambio  
  Volume 46 Numéro 1 Pages 88-97  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; behavior; Closed season; eastern pacific-ocean; eastern tropical pacific; Fisher behaviour; Fisheries management; fishing strategies; fleet dynamics; mixed fisheries; model; Purse-seine fishing; state; trawlers; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé The failure to achieve fisheries management objectives has been broadly discussed in international meetings. Measuring the effects of fishery regulations is difficult due to the lack of detailed information. The yellowfin tuna fishery in the eastern Pacific Ocean offers an opportunity to evaluate the fishers' responses to temporal regulations. We used data from observers on-board Mexican purse-seine fleet, which is the main fleet fishing on dolphin-associated tuna schools. In 2002, the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission implemented a closed season to reduce fishing effort for this fishery. For the period 1992-2008, we analysed three fishery indicators using generalized estimating equations to evaluate the fishers' response to the closure. We found that purse-seiners decreased their time spent in port, increased their fishing sets, and maintained their proportion of successful fishing sets. Our results highlight the relevance of accounting for the fisher behaviour to understand fisheries dynamics when establishing management regulations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0044-7447 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2072  
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Auteur (down) Tolotti, M.; Bauer, R.; Forget, F.; Bach, P.; Dagorn, L.; Travassos, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Fine-scale vertical movements of oceanic whitetip sharks (Carcharhinus longimanus) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Fishery Bulletin  
  Volume 115 Numéro 3 Pages 380-395  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0090-0656 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2146  
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Auteur (down) Tedesco, P.A.; Beauchard, O.; Bigorne, R.; Blanchet, S.; Buisson, L.; Conti, L.; Cornu, J.-F.; Dias, M.S.; Grenouillet, G.; Hugueny, B.; Jezequel, C.; Leprieur, F.; Brosse, S.; Oberdorff, T. doi  openurl
  Titre A global database on freshwater fish species occurrence in drainage basins Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Data  
  Volume 4 Numéro Pages 170141  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; distinctiveness; diversity; faunas; homogenization; patterns; worlds  
  Résumé A growing interest is devoted to global-scale approaches in ecology and evolution that examine patterns and determinants of species diversity and the threats resulting from global change. These analyses obviously require global datasets of species distribution. Freshwater systems house a disproportionately high fraction of the global fish diversity considering the small proportion of the earth's surface that they occupy, and are one of the most threatened habitats on Earth. Here we provide complete species lists for 3119 drainage basins covering more than 80% of the Earth surface using 14953 fish species inhabiting permanently or occasionally freshwater systems. The database results from an extensive survey of native and non-native freshwater fish species distribution based on 1436 published papers, books, grey literature and web-based sources. Alone or in combination with further datasets on species biological and ecological characteristics and their evolutionary history, this database represents a highly valuable source of information for further studies on freshwater macroecology, macroevolution, biogeography and conservation.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2052-4463 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2204  
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Auteur (down) Sydeman, W.J.; Thompson, S.A.; Anker-Nilssen, T.; Arimitsu, M.; Bennison, A.; Bertrand, S.; Boersch-Supan, P.; Boyd, C.; Bransome, N.C.; Crawford, R.J.M.; Daunt, F.; Furness, R.W.; Gianuca, D.; Gladics, A.; Koehn, L.; Lang, J.W.; Logerwell, E.; Morris, T.L.; Phillips, E.M.; Provencher, J.; Punt, A.E.; Saraux, C.; Shannon, L.; Sherley, R.B.; Simeone, A.; Wanless, R.M.; Wanless, S.; Zador, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Best practices for assessing forage fish fisheries-seabird resource competition Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 194 Numéro Pages 209-221  
  Mots-Clés fisheries; Forage fish; Methodology; resource competition; Seabirds  
  Résumé Worldwide, in recent years capture fisheries targeting lower-trophic level forage fish and euphausiid crustaceans have been substantial (∼20 million metric tons [MT] annually). Landings of forage species are projected to increase in the future, and this harvest may affect marine ecosystems and predator-prey interactions by removal or redistribution of biomass central to pelagic food webs. In particular, fisheries targeting forage fish and euphausiids may be in competition with seabirds, likely the most sensitive of marine vertebrates given limitations in their foraging abilities (ambit and gape size) and high metabolic rate, for food resources. Lately, apparent competition between fisheries and seabirds has led to numerous high-profile conflicts over interpretations, as well as the approaches that could and should be used to assess the magnitude and consequences of fisheries-seabird resource competition. In this paper, we review the methods used to date to study fisheries competition with seabirds, and present “best practices” for future resource competition assessments. Documenting current fisheries competition with seabirds generally involves addressing two major issues: 1) are fisheries causing localized prey depletion that is sufficient to affect the birds? (i.e., are fisheries limiting food resources?), and 2) how are fisheries-induced changes to forage stocks affecting seabird populations given the associated functional or numerical response relationships? Previous studies have been hampered by mismatches in the scale of fisheries, fish, and seabird data, and a lack of causal understanding due to confounding by climatic and other ecosystem factors (e.g., removal of predatory fish). Best practices for fisheries-seabird competition research should include i) clear articulation of hypotheses, ii) data collection (or summation) of fisheries, fish, and seabirds on matched spatio-temporal scales, and iii) integration of observational and experimental (including numerical simulation) approaches to establish connections and causality between fisheries and seabirds. As no single technique can provide all the answers to this vexing issue, an integrated approach is most promising to obtain robust scientific results and in turn the sustainability of forage fish fisheries from an ecosystem perspective.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2167  
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Auteur (down) Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 575 Numéro Pages 137-152  
  Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions  
  Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172  
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