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Auteur (up) Cazelles, K.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre On the integration of biotic interaction and environmental constraints at the biogeographical scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 39 Numéro 10 Pages 921-931  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; cooccurrence; distributions; ecological communities; evolutionary; food webs; networks; niche; species distribution models  
  Résumé Biogeography is primarily concerned with the spatial distribution of biodiversity, including performing scenarios in a changing environment. The efforts deployed to develop species distribution models have resulted in predictive tools, but have mostly remained correlative and have largely ignored biotic interactions. Here we build upon the theory of island biogeography as a first approximation to the assembly dynamics of local communities embedded within a metacommunity context. We include all types of interactions and introduce environmental constraints on colonization and extinction dynamics. We develop a probabilistic framework based on Markov chains and derive probabilities for the realization of species assemblages, rather than single species occurrences. We consider the expected distribution of species richness under different types of ecological interactions. We also illustrate the potential of our framework by studying the interplay between different ecological requirements, interactions and the distribution of biodiversity along an environmental gradient. Our framework supports the idea that the future research in biogeography requires a coherent integration of several ecological concepts into a single theory in order to perform conceptual and methodological innovations, such as the switch from single-species distribution to community distribution.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1683  
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Auteur (up) Cecchi, P.; Garrido, M.; Collos, Y.; Pasqualini, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Water flux management and phytoplankton communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon. Part II: Mixotrophy of dinoflagellates as an adaptive strategy? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume 108 Numéro 1–2 Pages 120-133  
  Mots-Clés Biguglia; Mediterranean coastal lagoon; Mixotrophy; Phyto-PAM; Phytoplankton; Prorocentrum minimum  
  Résumé Dinoflagellate proliferation is common in coastal waters, and trophic strategies are often advanced to explain the success of these organisms. The Biguglia lagoon is a Mediterranean brackish ecosystem where eutrophication has long been an issue, and where dominance of dinoflagellates has persisted for several years. Monthly monitoring of fluorescence-based properties of phytoplankton communities carried out in 2010 suggested that photosynthesis alone could not support the observed situation all year round. Contrasting food webs developed depending on the hydrological season, with a gradual shift from autotrophy to heterotrophy. Progressively, microphytoplankton assemblages became unequivocally dominated by a Prorocentrum minimum bloom, which exhibited very weak effective photosynthetic performance, whereas paradoxically its theoretical capacities remained fully operational. Different environmental hypotheses explaining this discrepancy were examined, but rejected. We conclude that P. minimum bloom persistence is sustained by mixotrophic strategies, with complex compromises between phototrophy and phagotrophy, as evidenced by fluorescence-based observations.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1579  
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Auteur (up) Cheminée, A.; Mérigot, B.; Vanderklift, M.A.; Francour, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Does habitat complexity influence fish recruitment? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mediterranean Marine Science  
  Volume 17 Numéro 1 Pages 39-46  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé Human activities facilitate coastal habitat transformation and homogenization. The spread of marine invasive species is one example. This in turn may influence fish recruitment and the subsequent replenishment of adult assemblages. We tested habitat complexity effect on fish (Teleostei) recruitment by experimentally manipulating meadows of the habitat-forming invasive macroalga Caulerpa taxifolia (Chlorophyta). Among the fourteen fish species recorded during the experiment, only two labrids ( Coris julis and Symphodus ocellatus ) settled in abundance among these meadows. Patterns in the abundance of these juveniles suggested that reduced tri-dimensional meadow complexity may reduce habitat quality and result in altered habitat choices and / or differential mortality of juveniles, therefore reducing fish recruitment and likely the abundance of adults.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1791-6763 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1480  
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Auteur (up) Cinner, J.E.; Huchery, C.; MacNeil, M.A.; Graham, N.A.J.; McClanahan, T.R.; Maina, J.; Maire, Eva; Kittinger, J.N.; Hicks, C.C.; Mora, C.; Allison, E.H.; D’Agata, S.; Hoey, A.; Feary, D.A.; Crowder, L.; Williams, I.D.; Kulbicki, M.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Edgar, G.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Sandin, S.A.; Green, A.L.; Hardt, M.J.; Beger, M.; Friedlander, A.; Campbell, S.J.; Holmes, K.E.; Wilson, S.K.; Brokovich, E.; Brooks, A.J.; Cruz-Motta, J.J.; Booth, D.J.; Chabanet, P.; Gough, C.; Tupper, M.; Ferse, S.C.A.; Sumaila, U.R.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nature  
  Volume 535 Numéro 7612 Pages 416-419  
  Mots-Clés Environmental impact; Sustainability; Tropical ecology  
  Résumé Ongoing declines in the structure and function of the world’s coral reefs require novel approaches to sustain these ecosystems and the millions of people who depend on them. A presently unexplored approach that draws on theory and practice in human health and rural development is to systematically identify and learn from the ‘outliers’—places where ecosystems are substantially better (‘bright spots’) or worse (‘dark spots’) than expected, given the environmental conditions and socioeconomic drivers they are exposed to. Here we compile data from more than 2,500 reefs worldwide and develop a Bayesian hierarchical model to generate expectations of how standing stocks of reef fish biomass are related to 18 socioeconomic drivers and environmental conditions. We identify 15 bright spots and 35 dark spots among our global survey of coral reefs, defined as sites that have biomass levels more than two standard deviations from expectations. Importantly, bright spots are not simply comprised of remote areas with low fishing pressure; they include localities where human populations and use of ecosystem resources is high, potentially providing insights into how communities have successfully confronted strong drivers of change. Conversely, dark spots are not necessarily the sites with the lowest absolute biomass and even include some remote, uninhabited locations often considered near pristine. We surveyed local experts about social, institutional, and environmental conditions at these sites to reveal that bright spots are characterized by strong sociocultural institutions such as customary taboos and marine tenure, high levels of local engagement in management, high dependence on marine resources, and beneficial environmental conditions such as deep-water refuges. Alternatively, dark spots are characterized by intensive capture and storage technology and a recent history of environmental shocks. Our results suggest that investments in strengthening fisheries governance, particularly aspects such as participation and property rights, could facilitate innovative conservation actions that help communities defy expectations of global reef degradation.  
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  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1628  
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Auteur (up) Coll, M.; Shannon, L.J.; Kleisner, K.M.; Juan-Jordá, M.J.; Bundy, A.; Akoglu, A.G.; Banaru, D.; Boldt, J.L.; Borges, M.F.; Cook, A.; Diallo, I.; Fu, C.; Fox, C.; Gascuel, D.; Gurney, L.J.; Hattab, T.; Heymans, J.J.; Jouffre, D.; Knight, B.R.; Kucukavsar, S.; Large, S.I.; Lynam, C.; Machias, A.; Marshall, K.N.; Masski, H.; Ojaveer, H.; Piroddi, C.; Tam, J.; Thiao, D.; Thiaw, M.; Torres, M.A.; Travers-Trolet, M.; Tsagarakis, K.; Tuck, I.; van der Meeren, G.I.; Yemane, D.; Zador, S.G.; Shin, Y.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Ecological indicators to capture the effects of fishing on biodiversity and conservation status of marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 60 Numéro Pages 947-962  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Conservation; Ecological indicators; Fishing impacts; Marine ecosystems; Redundancy; States; Trends  
  Résumé IndiSeas (“Indicators for the Seas”) is a collaborative international working group that was established in 2005 to evaluate the status of exploited marine ecosystems using a suite of indicators in a comparative framework. An initial shortlist of seven ecological indicators was selected to quantify the effects of fishing on the broader ecosystem using several criteria (i.e., ecological meaning, sensitivity to fishing, data availability, management objectives and public awareness). The suite comprised: (i) the inverse coefficient of variation of total biomass of surveyed species, (ii) mean fish length in the surveyed community, (iii) mean maximum life span of surveyed fish species, (iv) proportion of predatory fish in the surveyed community, (v) proportion of under and moderately exploited stocks, (vi) total biomass of surveyed species, and (vii) mean trophic level of the landed catch. In line with the Nagoya Strategic Plan of the Convention on Biological Diversity (2011–2020), we extended this suite to emphasize the broader biodiversity and conservation risks in exploited marine ecosystems. We selected a subset of indicators from a list of empirically based candidate biodiversity indicators initially established based on ecological significance to complement the original IndiSeas indicators. The additional selected indicators were: (viii) mean intrinsic vulnerability index of the fish landed catch, (ix) proportion of non-declining exploited species in the surveyed community, (x) catch-based marine trophic index, and (xi) mean trophic level of the surveyed community. Despite the lack of data in some ecosystems, we also selected (xii) mean trophic level of the modelled community, and (xiii) proportion of discards in the fishery as extra indicators. These additional indicators were examined, along with the initial set of IndiSeas ecological indicators, to evaluate whether adding new biodiversity indicators provided useful additional information to refine our understanding of the status evaluation of 29 exploited marine ecosystems. We used state and trend analyses, and we performed correlation, redundancy and multivariate tests. Existing developments in ecosystem-based fisheries management have largely focused on exploited species. Our study, using mostly fisheries independent survey-based indicators, highlights that biodiversity and conservation-based indicators are complementary to ecological indicators of fishing pressure. Thus, they should be used to provide additional information to evaluate the overall impact of fishing on exploited marine ecosystems.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1467  
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