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Auteur Bourjea, J.; Clermont, S.; Delgado, A.; Murua, H.; Ruiz, J.; Ciccione, S.; Chavance, P.
Titre Marine turtle interaction with purse-seine fishery in the Atlantic and Indian oceans: Lessons for management Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume (down) 178 Numéro Pages 74-87
Mots-Clés Atlantic Ocean; Bycatch; Fishery impacts; fishery management; Indian Ocean; Marine turtle
Résumé Bycatch of endangered marine turtles is a growing issue for the management of all fisheries, including the oceanic purse-seine fishery. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial and temporal variation in bycatch rates of these species in the entire European purse-seine fishery operating in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The study was based on data collected through observer programs from 1995 to 2011. During that period, a total of 15 913 fishing sets were observed, including 6 515 on Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) and 9 398 on free swimming schools, representing a global coverage of 10.3% and 5.1% of the total fishing activity in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively. Moreover, from 2003 to 2011, 14 124 specific observations were carried out on DFADs to check turtle entanglement in the net covering DFADs. We found that the purse-seine fishery has a very low impact on marine turtles. We estimated that the annual number of individuals incidentally captured was 218 (SD = 150) and 250 (SD = 157) in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively, with more than 75% being released alive. The present study also investigated the impact of DFADs; which is considered a key conservation issue for this fishery. Drifting objects may play a key role in aggregating juveniles of marine turtles, implying the need for improving their construction to avoid entanglement (e.g. avoiding nets in the structure); however, based on our study it is not the main source of incidental captures of marine turtles in this fishery.
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ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 349
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Auteur Capietto, A.; Escalle, L.; Chavance, P.; Dubroca, L.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Murua, H.; Floch, L.; Damiano, A.; Rowat, D.; Mérigot, B.
Titre Mortality of marine megafauna induced by fisheries: Insights from the whale shark, the world’s largest fish Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume (down) 174 Numéro Pages 147-151
Mots-Clés Apparent survival; Bycatch; Hotspots of interaction; marine conservation; Megafauna; Rhincodon typus
Résumé The expansion of human activities is endangering megafauna in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. While large marine vertebrates are often vulnerable and emblematic species, many are considered to be declining, primarily due to fisheries activities. In the open ocean, certain fisheries improve their efficiency of detecting tuna schools by locating and fishing close to some macro-organisms, such as whale sharks or marine mammals. However, collecting accurate data on the accidental capture and mortality of these organisms is a complex process. We analyzed a large database of logbooks from 65 industrial vessels with and without scientific observers on board (487,272 and 16,096 fishing sets since 1980 and 1995 respectively) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Distribution maps of Sightings Per Unit of Effort highlights major hotspots of interactions between the fishery and whale sharks in the coastal area from Gabon to Angola in the Atlantic from April to September, and in the Mozambique Channel in the Indian Ocean between April and May. The incidence of apparent whale shark mortality due to fishery interaction is extremely low (two of the 145 whale sharks encircled by the net died, i.e. 1.38%). However, these two hotspots presented a relatively high rate of incidental whale shark capture. Thus, we underline the importance of estimating long-term post-release mortality rates by tracking individuals and/or by photographic identification to define precise conservation management measures.
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ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 347
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Auteur ADJEROUD, M.; GUERECHEAU, A.; VIDAL-DUPIOL, J.; FLOT, J.-F.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; BONHOMME, F.
Titre Genetic diversity, clonality and connectivity in the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis: a multi-scale analysis in an insular, fragmented reef system Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biology
Volume (down) 161 Numéro 3 Pages 531-541
Mots-Clés
Résumé Clonality and genetic structure of the coral Pocillopora damicornis sensu lato were assessed using five microsatellites in 12 populations from four islands of the Society Archipelago (French Polynesia) sampled in June 2008. The 427 analysed specimens fell into 132 multilocus genotypes (MLGs), suggesting that asexual reproduction plays an important role in the maintenance of these populations. A haploweb analysis of ITS2 sequences of each MLG was consistent with all of them being conspecific. Genetic differentiation was detected both between and within islands, but when a single sample per MLG was included in the analyses, the populations turned out to be nearly panmictic. These observations provide further evidence of the marked variability in reproductive strategies and genetic structure of P. damicornis throughout its geographic range; comparison with results previously obtained for the congeneric species Pocillopora meandrina underlines the importance of life history traits in shaping the genetic structure of coral populations
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ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
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Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Inst Rech Dev, Unite 227, CoReUs2, Noumea 98848, New Caledonia.<br/>Author Address: CORAIL, Lab Excellence, F-66860 Perpignan, France.<br/>Author Address: Univ Perpignan, CNRS, UMR 5244, F-66860 Perpignan, France.<br/>Author Address: Univ Perpignan, UMR 5244, F-66860 Perpignan, France.<br/>Author Address: Max Planck Inst Dynam & Self Org, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany.<br/>Author Address: Inst Francais Rech Exploitat Mer, UMR 212, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Univ Montpellier 2, Inst Sci Evolut, CNRS, UMR 5554, F-34095 Montpellier 5, France.<br/>PB – Springer<br/> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 341
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Auteur Navarro, J.; López, L.; Coll, M.; Barría, C.; Sáez-Liante, R.
Titre Short- and long-term importance of small sharks in the diet of the rare deep-sea shark Dalatias licha Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol
Volume (down) 161 Numéro 7 Pages 1697-1707
Mots-Clés Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Microbiology; Oceanography; Zoology
Résumé Knowing the trophic ecology of marine predators is essential to develop an understanding of their ecological role in ecosystems. Research conducted on deep-sea and threatened shark species is limited. Here, by combining analyses of individual stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the trophic ecology (dietary composition and trophic position) of the kitefin shark Dalatias licha, a deep-sea shark considered as near threatened globally and as data deficient in the Mediterranean Sea. Results revealed the importance of small sharks in the diet of the kitefin shark at short- and long-term scales, although fin-fish, crustaceans and cephalopods were also found. Predation on sharks reveals the high trophic position of the kitefin shark within the food web of the western Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope values from liver and muscle tissues confirmed our results from stomach content analysis and the high trophic position.
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ISSN 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 385
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Auteur VAN BEVEREN, E.; BONHOMMEAU, S.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; BIGOT, J.-L.; BOURDEIX, J.-H.; BROSSET, P.; ROOS, D.; SARAUX, C.
Titre Rapid changes in growth, condition, size and age of small pelagic fish in the Mediterranean Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Marine Biology Revue Abrégée
Volume (down) 161 Numéro 8 Pages 1809-1822
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Résumé Since 2007, the ecosystem of the Gulf of Lions has shifted to a different regime, characterised by a low anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus) biomass and a remarkably high sprat (Sprattus sprattus) biomass. Surprisingly, the abundance and recruitment of anchovy and sardine remained high. To understand which processes (bottom-up or top-down control, etc.) could have caused this shift, we studied the changes in body condition, growth and size and age of anchovy, sardine and sprat over 1984–1985 and 1992–2012, using data from scientific surveys. The annual age structure of anchovy and sardine was estimated using Bayesian mixture models based on size frequency data with priors on the age–length relationship derived from independent otolith readings. The results indicated periods during which anchovy and sardine were in an average (1992–2004), good (2005–2007) or poor (2008–2012) overall state of condition. For sardine, the shift towards smaller fish observed during these past 4 years was explained by a combination of slower growth and the disappearance of older individuals (ages 2+). Despite the increase in biomass of sprat since 2008, indications were found that sprat was also smaller than in the past. As growth and condition decreased and overexploitation has not been documented or suspected for those three species in this area, we propose that the current decline in sardine and anchovy biomass could be due to qualitative and/or quantitative modifications in the planktonic production (i.e. a bottom-up control) or mass mortalities of adults due to an epidemic disease.
Adresse Univ Montpellier 2, Res Unit EME UMR 212, F-34203 Sete, France.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 30335 collection 986
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