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Auteur Van Dover, C.L.; Aronson, J.; Pendleton, L.; Smith, S.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Moreno-Mateos, D.; Barbier, E.; Billett, D.; Bowers, K.; Danovaro, R.; Edwards, A.; Kellert, S.; Morato, T.; Pollard, E.; Rogers, A.; Warner, R.
Titre Ecological Restoration in the Deep Sea: Desiderata Type (down) Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume 44 Numéro Pages 98-106
Mots-Clés Cold-water corals; Deep-sea resource use; Hydrothermal vents; Marine policy; Restoration science
Résumé An era of expanding deep-ocean industrialization is before us, with policy makers establishing governance frameworks for sustainable management of deep-sea resources while scientists learn more about the ecological structure and functioning of the largest biome on the planet. Missing from discussion of the stewardship of the deep ocean is ecological restoration. If existing activities in the deep sea continue or are expanded and new deep-ocean industries are developed, there is need to consider what is required to minimize or repair resulting damages to the deep-sea environment. In addition, thought should be given as to how any past damage can be rectified. This paper develops the discourse on deep-sea restoration and offers guidance on planning and implementing ecological restoration projects for deep-sea ecosystems that are already, or are at threat of becoming, degraded, damaged or destroyed. Two deep-sea restoration case studies or scenarios are described (deep-sea stony corals on the Darwin Mounds off the west coast of Scotland, deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) and are contrasted with on-going saltmarsh restoration in San Francisco Bay. For these case studies, a set of socio-economic, ecological, and technological decision parameters that might favor (or not) their restoration are examined. Costs for hypothetical restoration scenarios in the deep sea are estimated and first indications suggest they may be two to three orders of magnitude greater per hectare than costs for restoration efforts in shallow-water marine systems.
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Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA.<br/>Author Address: CNRS, Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, F-34033 Montpellier, France.<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Inst Environm Policy Solut, Durham, NC 27708 USA.<br/>Author Address: Nautilus Minerals, Milton, Qld, Australia.<br/>Author Address: IFREMER, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Stanford Univ, Woodside, CA 94062 USA.<br/>Author Address: Dept Econ & Finance, Laramie, WY 82071 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Southampton, Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.<br/>Author Address: Biohabitats, N Charleston, SC 29405 USA.<br/>Author Address: Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Life & Environm Sci, I-601321 Ancona, Italy.<br/>Author Address: Newcastle Univ, Sch Biol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England.<br/>Author Address: Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Acores, Dept Oceanog & Pescas, Ctr IMAR, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: LARSyS Associated Lab, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: EURC, Biodivers Consultancy, Cambridge CB2 1RR, England.<br/>Author Address: Dept Zool, Oxford OX1 3PS, England.<br/>Author Address: Univ Wollongong, Australian Natl Ctr Ocean Resources & Secur, North Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.<br/>PB – Elsevier Sci Ltd<br/> Approuvé pas de
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Auteur Ahmedou Salem, M.V.; van der Geest, M.; Piersma, T.; Saoud, Y.; van Gils, J.A.
Titre Seasonal changes in mollusc abundance in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, Banc d’Arguin (Mauritania): testing the ‘shorebird depletion’ hypothesis Type (down) Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science
Volume 136 Numéro Pages 26-34
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 943 collection 1366
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Auteur Ménard, F.; Benivary, H.D.; Bodin, N.; Coffineau, N.; Le Loc'h, F.; Mison, T.; Richard, P.; Potier, M.
Titre Stable isotope patterns in micronekton from the Mozambique Channel Type (down) Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro Pages 153-163
Mots-Clés Diel vertical migration; mesoscale; micronekton; Mozambique Channel; Oceanic eddies; trophic level; δ13C; δ15N
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Auteur Béhagle, N.; du Buisson, L.; Josse, E.; Lebourges-Dhaussy, A.; Roudaut, G.; Ménard, F.
Titre Mesoscale features and micronekton in the Mozambique Channel: An acoustic approach Type (down) Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro Pages 164-173
Mots-Clés Acoustics; Mesoscale eddies; micronekton; Mozambique Channel; Satellite altimetry
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Arias-González, J.E.; Bender, M.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.; Vigliola, L.; Bellwood, D.R.
Titre Functional over-redundancy and high functional vulnerability in global fish faunas on tropical reefs Type (down) Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume 111 Numéro 38 Pages 13757-13762
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Résumé When tropical systems lose species, they are often assumed to be buffered against declines in functional diversity by the ability of the species-rich biota to display high functional redundancy: i.e., a high number of species performing similar functions. We tested this hypothesis using a ninefold richness gradient in global fish faunas on tropical reefs encompassing 6,316 species distributed among 646 functional entities (FEs): i.e., unique combinations of functional traits. We found that the highest functional redundancy is located in the Central Indo-Pacific with a mean of 7.9 species per FE. However, this overall level of redundancy is disproportionately packed into few FEs, a pattern termed functional over-redundancy (FOR). For instance, the most speciose FE in the Central Indo-Pacific contains 222 species (out of 3,689) whereas 38% of FEs (180 out of 468) have no functional insurance with only one species. Surprisingly, the level of FOR is consistent across the six fish faunas, meaning that, whatever the richness, over a third of the species may still be in overrepresented FEs whereas more than one third of the FEs are left without insurance, these levels all being significantly higher than expected by chance. Thus, our study shows that, even in high-diversity systems, such as tropical reefs, functional diversity remains highly vulnerable to species loss. Although further investigations are needed to specifically address the influence of redundant vs. vulnerable FEs on ecosystem functioning, our results suggest that the promised benefits from tropical biodiversity may not be as strong as previously thought.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 600
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