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Auteur Gutowsky, S.E.; Tremblay, Y.; Kappes, M.A.; Flint, E.N.; Klavitter, J.; Laniawe, L.; Costa, D.P.; Naughton, M.B.; Romano, M.D.; Shaffer, S.A. url  doi
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  Titre (up) Divergent post-breeding distribution and habitat associations of fledgling and adult black-footed Albatrosses Phoebastria nigripes in the North Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ibis  
  Volume 156 Numéro 1 Pages 60-72  
  Mots-Clés dispersal; geolocators; habitat use; Juvenile; Procellariiform; satellite telemetry; seabird  
  Résumé Past tracking studies of marine animals have primarily targeted adults, biasing our understanding of at-sea habitat use toward older life stages. Anthropogenic threats persist throughout the at-sea ranges of all life stages and it is therefore of interest to population ecologists and managers alike to understand spatiotemporal distributions and possible niche differentiation between age-classes. In albatrosses, particularly little is known about the juvenile life stage when fledglings depart the colonies and venture to sea with no prior experience or parental guidance. We compared the dispersal of 22 fledgling Black-footed Albatross Phoebastria nigripes between 2006 and 2008 using satellite telemetry and 16 adults between 2008 and 2009 using geolocaters from Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. Following tag deployment, all fledglings spent several days within the calm atoll waters, then travelled northward until reaching 750-900km from the colony. At this point, fledgling distributions approached the productive North Pacific Transition Zone (NPTZ). Rather than reaching the high chlorophyll a densities on the leading edge of this zone, however, fledglings remained in areas of low productivity in the subtropical gyre. In contrast, adult albatrosses from the same breeding colony did not utilize the NPTZ at this time of year but rather ranged throughout the highly productive northern periphery of the Pacific Ocean Basin among the shelf regions off Japan and the Aleutian Islands. The dichotomy in habitat use between fledglings and adults from Midway Atoll results in complete spatial segregation between age-classes and suggests ontogenetic niche separation in this species. This research fills a large knowledge gap in at-sea habitat use during a little known yet critical life stage of albatrosses, and contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of differential mortality pressure between age-classes and overall conservation status for the vulnerable Black-footed Albatross.  
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  ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 329  
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Auteur Rishworth, G.M.; Tremblay, Y.; Green, D.B.; Connan, M.; Pistorius, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Drivers of Time-Activity Budget Variability during Breeding in a Pelagic Seabird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS ONE  
  Volume 9 Numéro 12 Pages  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé During breeding, animal behaviour is particularly sensitive to environmental and food resource availability. Additionally, factors such as sex, body condition, and offspring developmental stage can influence behaviour. Amongst seabirds, behaviour is generally predictably affected by local foraging conditions and has therefore been suggested as a potentially useful proxy to indicate prey state. However, besides prey availability and distribution, a range of other variables also influence seabird behavior, and these need to be accounted for to increase the signal-to-noise ratio when assessing specific characteristics of the environment based on behavioural attributes. The aim of this study was to use continuous, fine-scale time-activity budget data from a pelagic seabird (Cape gannet, Morus capensis) to determine the influence of intrinsic (sex and body condition) and extrinsic (offspring and time) variables on parent behaviour during breeding. Foraging trip duration and chick provisioning rates were clearly sex-specific and associated with chick developmental stage. Females made fewer, longer foraging trips and spent less time at the nest during chick provisioning. These sex-specific differences became increasingly apparent with chick development. Additionally, parents in better body condition spent longer periods at their nests and those which returned later in the day had longer overall nest attendance bouts. Using recent technological advances, this study provides new insights into the foraging behaviour of breeding seabirds, particularly during the post-guarding phase. The biparental strategy of chick provisioning revealed in this study appears to be an example where the costs of egg development to the female are balanced by paternal-dominated chick provisioning particularly as the chick nears fledging.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1202  
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Auteur Avadí, Á.; Vázquez-Rowe, I.; Freon, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Eco-efficiency assessment of the Peruvian anchoveta steel and wooden fleets using the LCA+DEA framework Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Cleaner Production  
  Volume 70 Numéro Pages 118-131  
  Mots-Clés Data envelopment analysis; Eco-efficiency; Engraulis ringens; Life cycle assessment; Peru  
  Résumé The Peruvian anchoveta fishery is currently targeted by a large fleet featuring a wide range of vessel sizes (segments), with highly variable capacities. In addition, the landings of the industrial fleet are used exclusively by the reduction industry, while those performed by small- and medium-scale vessels are destined mainly for direct human consumption. Despite these differences, the entire fleet is made up of purse seiners that perform similar operations when at sea. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to identify the differences in eco-efficiency between the different fleet segments in order to delve into the potential environmental improvements that could be attained through operational benchmarking. To this end, the combined use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) was applied to the Peruvian anchoveta fleet. More specifically, a modified 5-step LCA + DEA method, whose particularities are broadly discussed throughout the study, was computed to obtain the desired operational benchmarks and, thereafter, estimate the target environmental gains. Results led to an average efficiency score of 86% throughout the segments, with a total of eight fleet segments out of 13 (62%) operating inefficiently. Nevertheless, no clear pattern was identified through the segments, although certain correlations with stock abundance, fuel use intensity, overcapacity and climatic conditions are discussed. Reduction in material inputs based on operational benchmarks translated into environmental gains that ranged from 26% to 53% for inefficient segments. Finally, it is expected that the findings in this study may aid stakeholders and policy makers when revising fuel use optimisation and overcapacity management strategies.  
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  ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1146  
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Auteur Ecoutin, J.-M.; Simier, M.; Albaret, J.-J.; Laë, R.; Raffray, J.; Sadio, O.; Tito de Morais, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Ecological field experiment of short-term effects of fishing ban on fish assemblages in a tropical estuarine MPA Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ocean & Coastal Management  
  Volume 100 Numéro Pages 74-85  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), in addition to their important role in the conservation of critical habitats and vulnerable species, are now also used in a context of ecosystem-based fisheries management. The aim of this study was to assess the observed changes in the fish population structure in the years following a fishing ban. The experiment took place in the Bamboung bolong, a small bay in the Sine Saloum estuary in Senegal, West Africa. The protection of this zone was undertaken with local fishermen support, and a formal MPA was created in 2004. The survey of the fish assemblages was initiated in 2003, the year before the fishing ban, and went on until 2007, with 12 sampling sites being monitored three times per year. In this paper, we describe and analyze the evolution of the fish assemblage during this five years' experimental period. Some changes have been highlighted on which the effect of the fishing ban was shown. After the fishing ban, an increase of total biomass and of maximal fish length has been registered. In the same time, the number of species has increased and the percentage of large and/or iconic species targeted by fishing has also increased. The community structure has been modified, with more small fish, more big fish (new large species and more large individuals in the original species) and fewer medium sized fish. The contribution of marine affinity species has increased in depend of the estuarine part of the assemblage. Finally, the trophic structure has been modified with an overall increase of the mean trophic level, resulting from an increase of the percentage of generalist or piscivorous predators and a sharp decrease of herbivorous and detritivorous low trophic level species. Marine predators which numbers and size were reduced by fisheries are again important components of the system. We argue that despite the intrinsic variability of the tropical estuarine environments, the introduction of a total ban on fishing in such estuarine zones can substantially improve the health status of the fish assemblage.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1198  
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Auteur Van Dover, C.L.; Aronson, J.; Pendleton, L.; Smith, S.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Moreno-Mateos, D.; Barbier, E.; Billett, D.; Bowers, K.; Danovaro, R.; Edwards, A.; Kellert, S.; Morato, T.; Pollard, E.; Rogers, A.; Warner, R. url  openurl
  Titre (up) Ecological Restoration in the Deep Sea: Desiderata Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 44 Numéro Pages 98-106  
  Mots-Clés Cold-water corals; Deep-sea resource use; Hydrothermal vents; Marine policy; Restoration science  
  Résumé An era of expanding deep-ocean industrialization is before us, with policy makers establishing governance frameworks for sustainable management of deep-sea resources while scientists learn more about the ecological structure and functioning of the largest biome on the planet. Missing from discussion of the stewardship of the deep ocean is ecological restoration. If existing activities in the deep sea continue or are expanded and new deep-ocean industries are developed, there is need to consider what is required to minimize or repair resulting damages to the deep-sea environment. In addition, thought should be given as to how any past damage can be rectified. This paper develops the discourse on deep-sea restoration and offers guidance on planning and implementing ecological restoration projects for deep-sea ecosystems that are already, or are at threat of becoming, degraded, damaged or destroyed. Two deep-sea restoration case studies or scenarios are described (deep-sea stony corals on the Darwin Mounds off the west coast of Scotland, deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) and are contrasted with on-going saltmarsh restoration in San Francisco Bay. For these case studies, a set of socio-economic, ecological, and technological decision parameters that might favor (or not) their restoration are examined. Costs for hypothetical restoration scenarios in the deep sea are estimated and first indications suggest they may be two to three orders of magnitude greater per hectare than costs for restoration efforts in shallow-water marine systems.  
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  Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA.<br/>Author Address: CNRS, Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, F-34033 Montpellier, France.<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Inst Environm Policy Solut, Durham, NC 27708 USA.<br/>Author Address: Nautilus Minerals, Milton, Qld, Australia.<br/>Author Address: IFREMER, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Stanford Univ, Woodside, CA 94062 USA.<br/>Author Address: Dept Econ & Finance, Laramie, WY 82071 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Southampton, Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.<br/>Author Address: Biohabitats, N Charleston, SC 29405 USA.<br/>Author Address: Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Life & Environm Sci, I-601321 Ancona, Italy.<br/>Author Address: Newcastle Univ, Sch Biol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England.<br/>Author Address: Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Acores, Dept Oceanog & Pescas, Ctr IMAR, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: LARSyS Associated Lab, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: EURC, Biodivers Consultancy, Cambridge CB2 1RR, England.<br/>Author Address: Dept Zool, Oxford OX1 3PS, England.<br/>Author Address: Univ Wollongong, Australian Natl Ctr Ocean Resources & Secur, North Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.<br/>PB – Elsevier Sci Ltd<br/> Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 342  
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