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Auteur Clavier, J.; Chauvaud, L.; Amice, E.; Lazure, P.; van der Geest, M.; Labrosse, P.; Diagne, A.; Carlier, A.; Chauvaud, S. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Benthic metabolism in shallow coastal ecosystems of the Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series  
  Volume 501 Numéro Pages 11-23  
  Mots-Clés  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1236 collection 1368  
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Auteur Ban, N.C.; Maxwell, S.M.; Dunn, D.C.; Hobday, A.J.; Bax, N.J.; Ardron, J.; Gjerde, K.M.; Game, E.T.; Devillers, R.; Kaplan, D.M.; Dunstan, P.K.; Halpin, P.N.; Pressey, R.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Better integration of sectoral planning and management approaches for the interlinked ecology of the open oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Areas beyond national jurisdiction; Benthic-pelagic interlinkages; High seas; marine conservation; Marine Protected Areas; sustainable fisheries  
  Résumé Open oceans are one of the least protected, least studied and most inadequately managed ecosystems on Earth. Three themes were investigated that differentiate the open ocean (areas beyond national jurisdiction and deep area within exclusive economic zones) from other realms and must be considered when developing planning and management options: ecosystem interactions, especially between benthic and pelagic systems; potential effects of human activities in open oceans on ecological linkages; and policy context and options. A number of key ecological factors differentiate open oceans from coastal systems for planners and managers: (1) many species are widely distributed and, especially for those at higher trophic levels, wide ranging; (2) the sizes and boundaries of biogeographical domains (patterns of co-occurrence of species, habitats and ecosystem processes) vary significantly by depth; (3) habitat types exhibit a wide range of stabilities, from ephemeral (e.g., surface frontal systems) to hyper-stable (e.g., deep sea); and (4) vertical and horizontal linkages are prevalent. Together, these ecological attributes point to interconnectedness between open ocean habitats across large spatial scales. Indeed, human activities – especially fishing, shipping, and potentially deep-sea mining and oil and gas extraction – have effects far beyond the parts of the ocean in which they operate. While managing open oceans in an integrated fashion will be challenging, the ecological characteristics of the system demand it. A promising avenue forward is to integrate aspects of marine spatial planning (MSP), systematic conservation planning (SCP), and adaptive management. These three approaches to planning and management need to be integrated to meet the unique needs of open ocean systems, with MSP providing the means to meet a diversity of stakeholder needs, SCP providing the structured process to determine and prioritise those needs and appropriate responses, and adaptive management providing rigorous monitoring and evaluation to determine whether actions or their modifications meet both ecological and defined stakeholder needs. The flexibility of MSP will be enhanced by the systematic approach of SCP, while the rigorous monitoring of adaptive management will enable continued improvement as new information becomes available and further experience is gained.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
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  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 317  
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Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Biogeography of freshwater fishes of the Balkan Peninsula Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia  
  Volume 738 Numéro 1 Pages 205-220  
  Mots-Clés Balkan Peninsula; Beta diversity; Bioregionalisation; Conservation biogeography; Vulnerability; ancient lakes; biodiversity conservation; endemism; freshwater fish; global patterns; mitochondrial-dna sequences; north-america; phylogeography; species richness  
  Résumé Delineating biogeographical regions is a critical step towards the establishment and evaluation of conservation priorities. In the present study, we analysed the distribution patterns of the freshwater fish of an understudied European biodiversity hotspot, the Balkan Peninsula. Based on the most extensive available database of native freshwater fish species distributions, we performed a hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the major biogeographical regions of the Balkan Peninsula. We also highlighted the 'hottest hotspots' of freshwater fish diversity across the delimited biogeographical regions by describing the patterns of species richness, endemic and vulnerable species; indicator species were also determined. The bioregionalisation scheme consisted of eight groups of drainage basins that correspond to distinct regions of the Balkan Peninsula. Overall, the delineated biogeographical regions varied in terms of species richness, endemism, vulnerability (i.e. extinction threats) and indicator species composition. From a conservation perspective, this study emphasises the prioritisation of areas characterised by high levels of irreplaceability (endemism) and vulnerability (i.e. the Attikobeotia region, Ionian Sea and Prespa Lakes) and stresses the necessity of implementing a network of protected freshwater areas across the Balkan Peninsula.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 454  
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Auteur Tremblay, Y.; Thiebault, A.; Mullers, R.; Pistorius, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One  
  Volume 9 Numéro 2 Pages  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé The study of ecological and behavioral processes has been revolutionized in the last two decades with the rapid development of biologging-science. Recently, using image-capturing devices, some pilot studies demonstrated the potential of understanding marine vertebrate movement patterns in relation to their proximate, as opposed to remote sensed environmental contexts. Here, using miniaturized video cameras and GPS tracking recorders simultaneously, we show for the first time that information on the immediate visual surroundings of a foraging seabird, the Cape gannet, is fundamental in understanding the origins of its movement patterns. We found that movement patterns were related to specific stimuli which were mostly other predators such as gannets, dolphins or fishing boats. Contrary to a widely accepted idea, our data suggest that foraging seabirds are not directly looking for prey. Instead, they search for indicators of the presence of prey, the latter being targeted at the very last moment and at a very small scale. We demonstrate that movement patterns of foraging seabirds can be heavily driven by processes unobservable with conventional methodology. Except perhaps for large scale processes, local-enhancement seems to be the only ruling mechanism; this has profounds implications for ecosystem-based management of marine areas.  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 337  
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Auteur Bertrand, A.; Grados, D.; Colas, F.; Bertrand, S.; Capet, X.; Chaigneau, A.; Vargas, G.; Mousseigne, A.; Fablet, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Broad impacts of fine-scale dynamics on seascape structure from zooplankton to seabirds Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat Commun  
  Volume 5 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Biological sciences; Ecology; Oceanography  
  Résumé In marine ecosystems, like most natural systems, patchiness is the rule. A characteristic of pelagic ecosystems is that their ‘substrate’ consists of constantly moving water masses, where ocean surface turbulence creates ephemeral oases. Identifying where and when hotspots occur and how predators manage those vagaries in their preyscape is challenging because wide-ranging observations are lacking. Here we use a unique data set, gathering high-resolution and wide-range acoustic and GPS-tracking data. We show that the upper ocean dynamics at scales less than 10 km play the foremost role in shaping the seascape from zooplankton to seabirds. Short internal waves (100 m–1 km) play a major role, while submesoscale (~1–20 km) and mesoscale (~20–100 km) turbulence have a comparatively modest effect. Predicted changes in surface stratification due to global change are expected to have an impact on the number and intensity of physical structures and thus biological interactions from plankton to top predators.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 389  
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