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Auteur Navarro, J.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Saez, R.; Forero, M.G.; Kutcha, R.
Titre (down) Isotopic discrimination of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) in a host-specific holocephalan tapeworm Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Helminthology
Volume 88 Numéro 03 Pages 371-375
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ISSN 0022-149x, 1475-2697 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 384
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Auteur Laporte, M.; Shao, Z.; Berrebi, P.; Laabir, M.; Abadie, E.; Faivre, N.; Rieuvilleneuve, F.; Masseret, E.
Titre (down) Isolation of 12 microsatellite markers following a pyrosequencing procedure and cross-priming in two invasive cryptic species, Alexandrium catenella (group IV) and A. tamarense (group III) (Dinophyceae) Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin
Volume 83 Numéro 1 Pages 302-305
Mots-Clés Alexandrium; Biogeography; Invasive species; Microsatellite markers; dinophyceae; phytoplankton
Résumé Alexandrium catenella (group IV) and Alexandrium tamarense (group III) (Dinophyceae) are two cryptic invasive phytoplankton species belonging to the A. tamarense species complex. Their worldwide spread is favored by the human activities, transportation and climate change. In order to describe their diversity in the Mediterranean Sea and understand their settlements and maintenances in this area, new microsatellite markers were developed based on Thau lagoon (France) samples of A. catenella and A. tamarense strains. In this study twelve new microsatellite markers are proposed. Five of these microsatellite markers show amplifications on A. tamarense and ten on A. catenella. Three of these 12 microsatellite markers allowed amplifications on both cryptic species. Finally, the haplotypic diversity ranged from 0.000 to 0.791 and 0.000 to 0.942 for A. catenella and A. tamarense respectively.
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ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 668
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Auteur Katsanevakis, S.; Coll, M.; Piroddi, C.; Steenbeek, J.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Zenetos, A.; Cardoso, A.C.
Titre (down) Invading the Mediterranean Sea: biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci
Volume 1 Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés alien species; Aquaculture; biodiversity patterns; biological invasions; Lessepsian migrants; pathways; shipping
Résumé Human activities, such as shipping, aquaculture, and the opening of the Suez Canal, have led to the introduction of nearly 1000 alien species into the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated how human activities, by providing pathways for the introduction of alien species, may shape the biodiversity patterns in the Mediterranean Sea. Richness of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal (Lessepsian species) is very high along the eastern Mediterranean coastline, reaching a maximum of 129 species per 100 km2, and declines toward the north and west. The distribution of species introduced by shipping is strikingly different, with several hotspot areas occurring throughout the Mediterranean basin. Two main hotspots for aquaculture-introduced species are observed (the Thau and Venice lagoons). Certain taxonomic groups were mostly introduced through specific pathways—fish through the Suez Canal, macrophytes by aquaculture, and invertebrates through the Suez Canal and by shipping. Hence, the local taxonomic identity of the alien species was greatly dependent on the dominant maritime activities/interventions and the related pathways of introduction. The composition of alien species differs among Mediterranean ecoregions; such differences are greater for Lessepsian and aquaculture-introduced species. The spatial pattern of native species biodiversity differs from that of alien species: the overall richness of native species declines from the north-western to the south-eastern regions, while the opposite trend is observed for alien species. The biodiversity of the Mediterranean Sea is changing, and further research is needed to better understand how the new biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities will affect the Mediterranean food webs, ecosystem functioning, and the provision of ecosystem services.
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Numéro d'Appel collection 313
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Auteur van den Hout, P.J.; van Gils, J.A.; Robin, F.; van der Geest, M.; Dekinga, A.; Piersma, T.
Titre (down) Interference from adults forces young red knots to forage for longer and in dangerous places Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Animal Behaviour
Volume 88 Numéro Pages 137-146
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1072 collection 1374
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Auteur Roberts, M.J.; Ternon, J.-F.; Morris, T.
Titre (down) Interaction of dipole eddies with the western continental slope of the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro no spécial Pages 54-67
Mots-Clés Chlorophyll filaments; Currents; Dipole eddies; Mozambique Channel; Slope upwelling
Résumé Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) data were used to track a southward propagating eddy dipole along the western slope of the Mozambique Channel over some 6 months. In April 2005, this dipole (with the cyclone to the south) was close to the continental slope off southern Mozambique. The contact zone between the contra-rotating vortices and the slope was surveyed by ship using onboard (S-)ADCP and CTD lines. The data showed strong ( > 1.4 m s(-1)) southward (geostrophic) currents over the slope adjacent to the anticyclone with horizontal divergence over the shelf edge. Significant slope upwelling between the dipole and the shelf was evident, concomitant with enhanced nutrient and chlorophyll levels enriching shelf near-surface waters. Satellite observations depicted a 300 km long surface chlorophyll filament extending offshore in the frontal zone between the contra-rotating vortices. A satellite-tracked drifter deployed at the coastal base of this filament confirmed the offshore advection of chlorophyll-enriched shelf water, which ultimately wrapped around the cyclone and filling its centre. The slope upwelling was also clearly evident in hourly temperature data collected by a recorder deployed on a nearby reef (Zambia Reef) in a depth of 18 m. According to the SLA data, the dipole took several weeks to pass Zambia Reef causing prolonged bouts of upwelling that finally ceased when it left the continental slope and moved southwards into the open ocean. Further analysis showed that lone anticyclones and cyclones against the Mozambique continental shelf also induce slope upwelling as a result of horizontal divergence created by the radial circulation of the vortex. In the case of cyclones, the divergence occurs north of the contact zone. Overall, this case study confirms that eddies moving southwards along the western side of the Mozambique Channel are the main mechanism for pumping nutrients into the otherwise oligotrophic surface waters, and moreover, provide a vigorous mechanism for shelf-open ocean exchange.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
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ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 370
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