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Auteur Moreau, S.; Mostajir, B.; Almandoz, G.O.; Demers, S.; Hernando, M.; Lemarchand, K.; Lionard, M.; Mercier, B.; Roy, S.; Schloss, I.R.; Thyssen, M.; Ferreyra, G.A. url  doi
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  Titre Effects of enhanced temperature and ultraviolet B radiation on a natural plankton community of the Beagle Channel (southern Argentina): a mesocosm study Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Microbial Ecology  
  Volume 72 Numéro 2 Pages 155-173  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé ABSTRACT: Marine planktonic communities can be affected by increased temperatures associated with global climate change, as well as by increased ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm) through stratospheric ozone layer thinning. We studied individual and combined effects of increased temperature and UVBR on the plankton community of the Beagle Channel, southern Patagonia, Argentina. Eight 2 m3 mesocosms were exposed to 4 treatments (with 2 replicates) during 10 d: (1) control (natural temperature and UVBR), (2) increased UVBR (simulating a 60% decrease in stratospheric ozone layer thickness), (3) increased temperature (+ 3°C), and (4) simultaneous increased temperature and UVBR (60% decrease in stratospheric ozone; + 3°C). Two distinct situations were observed with regard to phytoplankton biomass: bloom (Days 1-4) and post-bloom (Days 5-9). Significant decreases in micro-sized diatoms (>20 µm), bacteria, chlorophyll a, and particulate organic carbon concentrations were observed during the post-bloom in the enhanced temperature treatments relative to natural temperature, accompanied by significant increases in nanophytoplankton (10-20 µm, mainly prymnesiophytes). The decrease in micro-sized diatoms in the high temperature treatment may have been caused by a physiological effect of warming, although we do not have activity measurements to support this hypothesis. Prymnesiophytes benefited from micro-sized diatom reduction in their competition for resources. The bacterial decrease under warming may have been due to a change in the dissolved organic matter release caused by the observed change in phytoplankton composition. Overall, the rise in temperature affected the structure and total biomass of the communities, while no major effect of UVBR was observed on the plankton community.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 555  
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Auteur Delzor, A.; Couratier, P.; Boumédiène, F.; Nicol, M.; Druet-Cabanac, M.; Paraf, F.; Méjean, A.; Ploux, O.; Leleu, J.-P.; Brient, L.; Lengronne, M.; Pichon, V.; Combès, A.; El Abdellaoui, S.; Bonneterre, V.; Lagrange, E.; Besson, G.; Bicout, D.J.; Boutonnat, J.; Camu, W.; Pageot, N.; Juntas-Morales, R.; Rigau, V.; Masseret, E.; Abadie, E.; Preux, P.-M.; Marin, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Searching for a link between the L-BMAA neurotoxin and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study protocol of the French BMAALS programme Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée BMJ Open  
  Volume 4 Numéro 8 Pages  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé Introduction Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neurone disease. It occurs in two forms: (1) familial cases, for which several genes have been identified and (2) sporadic cases, for which various hypotheses have been formulated. Notably, the β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) toxin has been postulated to be involved in the occurrence of sporadic ALS. The objective of the French BMAALS programme is to study the putative link between L-BMAA and ALS.Methods and analysis The programme covers the period from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2011. Using multiple sources of ascertainment, all the incident ALS cases diagnosed during this period in the area under study (10 counties spread over three French regions) were collected. First, the standardised incidence ratio will be calculated for each municipality under concern. Then, by applying spatial clustering techniques, overincidence and underincidence zones of ALS will be sought. A case–control study, in the subpopulation living in the identified areas, will gather information about patients’ occupations, leisure activities and lifestyle habits in order to assess potential risk factors to which they are or have been exposed. Specimens of drinking water, food and biological material (brain tissue) will be examined to assess the presence of L-BMAA in the environment and tissues of ALS cases and controls.Ethics and dissemination The study has been reviewed and approved by the French ethical committee of the CPP SOOM IV (Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud-Ouest & Outre-Mer IV). The results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 818  
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Auteur Katsanevakis, S.; Coll, M.; Piroddi, C.; Steenbeek, J.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Zenetos, A.; Cardoso, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Invading the Mediterranean Sea: biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci  
  Volume 1 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés alien species; Aquaculture; biodiversity patterns; biological invasions; Lessepsian migrants; pathways; shipping  
  Résumé Human activities, such as shipping, aquaculture, and the opening of the Suez Canal, have led to the introduction of nearly 1000 alien species into the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated how human activities, by providing pathways for the introduction of alien species, may shape the biodiversity patterns in the Mediterranean Sea. Richness of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal (Lessepsian species) is very high along the eastern Mediterranean coastline, reaching a maximum of 129 species per 100 km2, and declines toward the north and west. The distribution of species introduced by shipping is strikingly different, with several hotspot areas occurring throughout the Mediterranean basin. Two main hotspots for aquaculture-introduced species are observed (the Thau and Venice lagoons). Certain taxonomic groups were mostly introduced through specific pathways—fish through the Suez Canal, macrophytes by aquaculture, and invertebrates through the Suez Canal and by shipping. Hence, the local taxonomic identity of the alien species was greatly dependent on the dominant maritime activities/interventions and the related pathways of introduction. The composition of alien species differs among Mediterranean ecoregions; such differences are greater for Lessepsian and aquaculture-introduced species. The spatial pattern of native species biodiversity differs from that of alien species: the overall richness of native species declines from the north-western to the south-eastern regions, while the opposite trend is observed for alien species. The biodiversity of the Mediterranean Sea is changing, and further research is needed to better understand how the new biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities will affect the Mediterranean food webs, ecosystem functioning, and the provision of ecosystem services.  
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  Numéro d'Appel collection 313  
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Auteur Sequeira, A.M.M.; Mellin, C.; Floch, L.; Williams, P.G.; Bradshaw, C.J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Inter-ocean asynchrony in whale shark occurrence patterns Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 450 Numéro Pages 21-29  
  Mots-Clés <!–; –><keyword; Handled; id=; Not; Tag  
  Résumé Abstract The whale shark (Rhincodon typus, Smith, 1828) is a migratory species (classed as Vulnerable by the IUCN) with genetic and circumstantial evidence for inter-ocean connectivity. Given this migratory behaviour, population-wide occurrence trends can only be contextualized by examining the synchrony in occurrence patterns among locations where they occur. We present a two-step modelling approach of whale shark spatial and temporal probability of occurrence in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans using generalized linear mixed-effects models. To test the hypothesis that the probability of whale shark occurrence is asynchronous across oceans, as expected if inter-ocean migration occurs, we used long-term datasets of whale shark sightings derived from tuna purse-seine logbooks covering most of the central-east Atlantic (1980–2010) and western Pacific (2000–2010). We predicted seasonal habitat suitability to produce maps in each area, and then evaluated the relative effect of time (year) on the probability of occurrence to test whether it changed over the study period. We also applied fast Fourier transforms to determine if any periodicity was apparent in whale shark occurrences in each ocean. After partialling out the effects of seasonal patterns in spatial distribution and sampling effort, we found no evidence for a temporal trend in whale shark occurrence in the Atlantic, but there was a weak trend of increasing probability of occurrence in the Pacific. The highest-ranked model for the latter included a spatial predictor of occurrence along with fishing effort, a linear term for time, and a random temporal effect (year), explaining 15% of deviance in whale shark probability of occurrence. Fast Fourier transforms revealed a prominent 15.5-year cycle in the Atlantic. The increase in the probability of occurrence in the Pacific is concurrent with a decrease previously detected in the Indian Ocean. Cyclic patterns driven by migratory behaviour would better explain temporal trends in whale shark occurrence at the oceanic scale. However, despite cycles partially explaining observations of fewer sharks in some years, overall reported sighting rate has been decreasing. As a result, we suggest that the current {IUCN} status of the species should be re-assessed, but more data are needed to examine the flow of individuals across oceans and to identify possible reasons for asynchronous occurrences.  
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  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 314  
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Auteur Poisson, F.; Séret, B.; Vernet, A.-L.; Goujon, M.; Dagorn, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Collaborative research: Development of a manual on elasmobranch handling and release best practices in tropical tuna purse-seine fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 44 Numéro Pages 312-320  
  Mots-Clés <!–; –><keyword; Handled; id=; Not; Tag  
  Résumé Abstract The reduction of by-catch mortality is an objective of the ecosystem approach to fisheries and a request made by consumers. Elasmobranchs, an important component of the French tropical tuna purse seine fishery by-catch, are currently thrown back into the sea. Fishers interact with various types of elasmobranchs that range widely in size, weight and shape, and could pose various degrees of danger to the crew. A diversity of discarding practices within the fleet were reported, some practices were considered suitable, others needed to be adapted and improved and others simply had to be banned. The majority of the crews were likely to improve their handling practices if they were presented with practical suggestions that were quick and easy. Combining scientific observations and empirical knowledge from skippers and crew, a manual, providing appropriate handling practices to ensure crew safety and increase the odds of survival for released animals has been developed and disseminated. Bringing these good practices onto the decks of fishing vessels should contribute to the reduction of the fishing mortality of some vulnerable species. It would be positively viewed by consumers as an act that reduces fishing's footprint on the environment and promoting animal welfare which would improve the image of fishing industry. Mitigation research is by definition an iterative process and different complementary methods must be carried out at different levels of the fishing process to significantly reduce the mortality of the by-catch.  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 315  
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