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Auteur Pikitch, E.K.; Rountos, K.J.; Essington, T.E.; Santora, C.; Pauly, D.; Watson, R.; Sumaila, U.R.; Boersma, P.D.; Boyd, I.L.; Conover, D.O.; Cury, P.; Heppell, S.S.; Houde, E.D.; Mangel, M.; Plaganyi, E.; Sainsbury, K.; Steneck, R.S.; Geers, T.M.; Gownaris, N.; Munch, S.B.
Titre The global contribution of forage fish to marine fisheries and ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish and Fisheries
Volume 15 Numéro 1 Pages 43-64
Mots-Clés ecosystem-based management; Ecosystem service; fish; fisheries value; forage; supportive values; trade-offs
Résumé Forage fish play a pivotal role in marine ecosystems and economies worldwide by sustaining many predators and fisheries directly and indirectly. We estimate global forage fish contributions to marine ecosystems through a synthesis of 72 published Ecopath models from around the world. Three distinct contributions of forage fish were examined: (i) the ecological support service of forage fish to predators in marine ecosystems, (ii) the total catch and value of forage fisheries and (iii) the support service of forage fish to the catch and value of other commercially targeted predators. Forage fish use and value varied and exhibited patterns across latitudes and ecosystem types. Forage fish supported many kinds of predators, including fish, seabirds, marine mammals and squid. Overall, forage fish contribute a total of about 16.9 billion USD to global fisheries values annually, i.e. 20% of the global ex-vessel catch values of all marine fisheries combined. While the global catch value of forage fisheries was 5.6 billion, fisheries supported by forage fish were more than twice as valuable (11.3 billion). These estimates provide important information for evaluating the trade-offs of various uses of forage fish across ecosystem types, latitudes and globally. We did not estimate a monetary value for supportive contributions of forage fish to recreational fisheries or to uses unrelated to fisheries, and thus the estimates of economic value reported herein understate the global value of forage fishes.
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ISSN 1467-2960 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 332
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Auteur Putman, N.F.; Abreu-Grobois, F.A.; Broderick, A.C.; Ciofi, C.; Formia, A.; Godley, B.J.; Stroud, S.; Pelembe, T.; Verley, P.; Williams, N.
Titre Numerical dispersal simulations and genetics help explain the origin of hawksbill sea turtles in Ascension Island Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 450 Numéro Special Issue Pages 98-108
Mots-Clés dispersal; mtDNA; ocean circulation model; Sea turtle
Résumé Long-distance dispersal and ontogenetic shifts in habitat use are characteristic of numerous marine species and have important ecological, evolutionary, and management implications. These processes, however, are often challenging to study due to the vast areas involved. We used genetic markers and simulations of physical transport within an ocean circulation model to gain understanding into the origin ofjuvenile hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) found at Ascension Island, a foraging ground that is thousands of kilometers from known nesting beaches. Regional origin of genetic markers suggests that turtles are from Western Atlantic (86%) and Eastern Atlantic (14%) rookeries. In contrast, numerical simulations of transport by ocean currents suggest that passive dispersal from the western sources would be negligible and instead would primarily be from the East, involving rookeries along Western Africa (i.e., Principe Island) and, potentially, from as far as the Indian Ocean (e.g., Mayotte and the Seychelles). Given that genetic analysis identified the presence of a haplotype endemic to Brazilian hawksbill rookeries at Ascension, we examined the possible role of swimming behavior by juvenile hawksbills from NE Brazil on their current-borne transport to Ascension Island by performing numerical experiments in which swimming behavior was simulated for virtual particles (simulated turtles). We found that oriented swimming substantially influenced the distribution of particles, greatly altering the proportion of particles dispersing into the North Atlantic and South Atlantic. Assigning location-dependent orientation behavior to particles allowed them to reach Ascension Island, remain in favorable temperatures, encounter productive foraging areas, and return to the vicinity of their natal site. The age at first arrival to Ascension (4.5-5.5 years) of these particles corresponded well to estimates of hawksbill age based on their size. Our findings suggest that ocean currents and swimming behavior play an important role in the oceanic ecology of sea turtles and other marine animals.
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ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 333
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Auteur Travis, J.; Coleman, F.C.; Auster, P.J.; Cury, P.; Estes, J.A.; Orensanz, J.; Peterson, C.H.; Power, M.E.; Steneck, R.S.; Wootton, J.T.
Titre Integrating the invisible fabric of nature into fisheries management Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume 111 Numéro 2 Pages 581-584
Mots-Clés alternative states; ecosystem flips; fisheries collapse; ocean fisheries
Résumé Overfishing and environmental change have triggered many severe and unexpected consequences. As existing communities have collapsed, new ones have become established, fundamentally transforming ecosystems to those that are often less productive for fisheries, more prone to cycles of booms and busts, and thus less manageable. We contend that the failure of fisheries science and management to anticipate these transformations results from a lack of appreciation for the nature, strength, complexity, and outcome of species interactions. Ecologists have come to understand that networks of interacting species exhibit nonlinear dynamics and feedback loops that can produce sudden and unexpected shifts. We argue that fisheries science and management must follow this lead by developing a sharper focus on species interactions and how disrupting these interactions can push ecosystems in which fisheries are embedded past their tipping points.
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ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 336
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Auteur Tremblay, Y.; Thiebault, A.; Mullers, R.; Pistorius, P.
Titre Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 9 Numéro 2 Pages
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Résumé The study of ecological and behavioral processes has been revolutionized in the last two decades with the rapid development of biologging-science. Recently, using image-capturing devices, some pilot studies demonstrated the potential of understanding marine vertebrate movement patterns in relation to their proximate, as opposed to remote sensed environmental contexts. Here, using miniaturized video cameras and GPS tracking recorders simultaneously, we show for the first time that information on the immediate visual surroundings of a foraging seabird, the Cape gannet, is fundamental in understanding the origins of its movement patterns. We found that movement patterns were related to specific stimuli which were mostly other predators such as gannets, dolphins or fishing boats. Contrary to a widely accepted idea, our data suggest that foraging seabirds are not directly looking for prey. Instead, they search for indicators of the presence of prey, the latter being targeted at the very last moment and at a very small scale. We demonstrate that movement patterns of foraging seabirds can be heavily driven by processes unobservable with conventional methodology. Except perhaps for large scale processes, local-enhancement seems to be the only ruling mechanism; this has profounds implications for ecosystem-based management of marine areas.
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 337
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Auteur Ashiq Ur Rahman, M.; Ajmal Khan, S.; Lyla, P.S.; Durand, J.-D.
Titre First record of Osteomugil perusii (Teleostei: Mugilidae) in Indian waters Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biodiversity Records
Volume 7 Numéro Pages null-null
Mots-Clés India; Indo-West Pacific; Kochi; Mugilidae; Parangipettai; long-finned mullet; record
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ISSN 1755-2672 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 594
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