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Auteur Dias, M.S.; Oberdorff, T.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Jezequel, C.; Cornu, J.F.; Brosse, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Tedesco, P.A.
Titre Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1130-1140
Mots-Clés (up) Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; Biogeography; Quaternary climate changes; africa; climate changes; contemporary; diversity patterns; endemism; evolution; freshwater fish; global; history; north-america; richness; river systems; scale; sea-level changes; species turnover; species-richness
Résumé The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity.
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ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 631
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Auteur Travis, J.; Coleman, F.C.; Auster, P.J.; Cury, P.; Estes, J.A.; Orensanz, J.; Peterson, C.H.; Power, M.E.; Steneck, R.S.; Wootton, J.T.
Titre Integrating the invisible fabric of nature into fisheries management Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume 111 Numéro 2 Pages 581-584
Mots-Clés (up) alternative states; ecosystem flips; fisheries collapse; ocean fisheries
Résumé Overfishing and environmental change have triggered many severe and unexpected consequences. As existing communities have collapsed, new ones have become established, fundamentally transforming ecosystems to those that are often less productive for fisheries, more prone to cycles of booms and busts, and thus less manageable. We contend that the failure of fisheries science and management to anticipate these transformations results from a lack of appreciation for the nature, strength, complexity, and outcome of species interactions. Ecologists have come to understand that networks of interacting species exhibit nonlinear dynamics and feedback loops that can produce sudden and unexpected shifts. We argue that fisheries science and management must follow this lead by developing a sharper focus on species interactions and how disrupting these interactions can push ecosystems in which fisheries are embedded past their tipping points.
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ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 336
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Auteur Chaboud, C.
Titre Economie des pêches Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages 277-344
Mots-Clés (up) Amenagement Des Peches; Demande; Economie De Marche; Economie Des Peches; Effort De Peche; Gestion Des Peches; Groupe D'Age; Modele Bioeconomique; Modelisation; Prix; Ressources Halieutiques
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Editeur Iste Lieu de Publication Londres Éditeur Monaco, A.; Prouzet, P.
Langue fre Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Mer et Océan Titre de collection Abrégé Valorisation et économie des ressources marines
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 9781784050 Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1316
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Auteur Collos, Y.; Jauzein, C.; Ratmaya, W.; Souchu, P.; Abadie, E.; Vaquer, A.
Titre Comparing diatom and Alexandrium catenella/tamarense blooms in Thau lagoon: Importance of dissolved organic nitrogen in seasonally N-limited systems Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Harmful Algae
Volume 37 Numéro Pages 84-91
Mots-Clés (up) Ammonium; Growth rate; Non classical blooms; Organic nitrogen; alexandrium catenella/tamarense
Résumé Diatom blooms in Thau lagoon are always related to rain events leading to inputs of inorganic nutrients such as phosphate, ammonium and nitrate through the watershed with time lags of about 1 week. In contrast, blooms of Alexandrium catenella/tamarense can occur following periods of 3 weeks without precipitation and no significant input of conventional nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. Field results also indicate a significant drop (from 22–25 to 15–16 μM over 3 days) in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) at the bloom peak, as well as a significant inverse relationship between A. catenella/tamarense cell density and DON concentrations that is not apparent for diatom blooms. Such dinoflagellate blooms are also associated with elevated (6–9 μM) ammonium concentrations, a curious feature also observed by other investigators, possibly the results of ammonium excretion by this organism during urea or other organic nitrogen assimilation. The potential use of DON by this organism represents short cuts in the nitrogen cycle between plants and nutrients and requires a new model for phytoplankton growth that is different from the classical diatom bloom model. In contrast to such diatom blooms that are due to conventional (nitrate, phosphate) nutrient pulses, Alexandrium catenella/tamarense blooms on the monthly time scale are due to organic nutrient enrichment, a feature that allows net growth rates of about 1.3 d−1, a value higher than that generally attributed to such organisms.
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ISSN 1568-9883 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 475
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Auteur Anderson, P.S.L.; Claverie, T.; Patek, S.N.
Titre Levers And Linkages: Mechanical Trade-Offs In A Power-Amplified System Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolution
Volume 68 Numéro 7 Pages 1919-1933
Mots-Clés (up) amplification; Biomechanics; comparative methods; evolution; kinematic transmission; labrid fishes; mantis shrimp; modularity; morphology; phylogenetic; stomatopods; strike; trade-offs
Résumé Mechanical redundancy within a biomechanical system (e. g., many-to-one mapping) allows morphologically divergent organisms to maintain equivalent mechanical outputs. However, most organisms depend on the integration of more than one biomechanical system. Here, we test whether coupled mechanical systems follow a pattern of amplification (mechanical changes are congruent and evolve toward the same functional extreme) or independence (mechanisms evolve independently). We examined the correlated evolution and evolutionary pathways of the coupled four-bar linkage and lever systems in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) ultrafast raptorial appendages. We examined models of character evolution in the framework of two divergent groups of stomatopods-“smashers” (hammer-shaped appendages) and “spearers” (bladed appendages). Smashers tended to evolve toward force amplification, whereas spearers evolved toward displacement amplification. These findings show that coupled biomechanical systems can evolve synergistically, thereby resulting in functional amplification rather than mechanical redundancy.
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ISSN 0014-3820 ISBN Médium
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Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AL3TK<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 40<br/>Anderson, Philip S. L. Claverie, Thomas Patek, S. N.<br/>National Science Foundation [IOS-1149748]<br/>The authors would like to thank S. Price for extensive assistance on phylogenetic comparative methods and L. Revell for help and advice for using his Phytools package for R. We would also like to thank M. Porter, M. Rosario, P. Green, S. Cox, and K. Kagaya for helpful discussions on stomatopod biology as well as two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments, which have greatly improved the quality of this article. We also thank K. Reed (National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC) and S. Keable (Australian Museum of Natural History, Sydney) for access to their specimen collections. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (IOS-1149748) to SNP. The authors declare no conflict of interest.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1156
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