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Auteur ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; MOALIC, Y.; HERNANDEZ-GARCIA, E.; EGUILUZ, V.M.; ALBERTO, F.; SERRAO, E.A.; DUARTE, C.M.
Titre Disentangling the Influence of Mutation and Migration in Clonal Seagrasses Using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum for Microsatellites Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal Of Heredity
Volume 105 Numéro 4 Pages 532-541
Mots-Clés clonality; genetic divergence; Genetic Diversity Spectrum; microsatellites; Seagrass; stepwise mutation
Résumé The recurrent lack of isolation by distance reported at regional scale in seagrass species was recently suggested to stem from stochastic events of large-scale dispersal. We explored the usefulness of phylogenetic information contained in microsatellite loci to test this hypothesis by using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum (GDS) on databases containing, respectively, 7 and 9 microsatellites genotypes for 1541 sampling units of Posidonia oceanica and 1647 of Cymodocea nodosa. The simultaneous increase of microsatellite and geographic distances that emerges reveals a coherent pattern of isolation by distance in contrast to the chaotic pattern previously described using allele frequencies, in particular, for the long-lived P. oceanica. These results suggest that the lack of isolation by distance, rather than the resulting from rare events of large-scale dispersal, reflects at least for some species a stronger influence of mutation over migration at the scale of the distribution range. The global distribution of genetic polymorphism may, therefore, result predominantly from ancient events of step-by-step (re)colonization followed by local recruitment and clonal growth, rather than contemporary gene flow. The analysis of GDS appears useful to unravel the evolutionary forces influencing the dynamics and evolution at distinct temporal and spatial scales by accounting for phylogenetic information borne by microsatellites, under an appropriate mutation model. This finding adds nuance to the generalization of the influence of large-scale dispersal on the dynamics of seagrasses.
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ISSN (up) 0022-1503 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1138
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Auteur Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Deneubourg, J.L.
Titre The aggregation of tuna around floating objects: What could be the underlying social mechanisms? Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology
Volume 359 Numéro Pages 161-170
Mots-Clés Fish Aggregating Devices; Models of aggregation; Monte Carlo multi-agents simulations; Social behavior
Résumé Several empirical and theoretical studies have shown how the exploitation of food sources, the choice of resting sites or other types of collective decision-making in heterogeneous environments are facilitated and modulated by social interactions between conspecifics. It is well known that many pelagic fishes live in schools and that this form of gregarious behavior provides advantages in terms of food intake and predator avoidance efficiency. However, the influence of social behavior in the formation of aggregations by tuna under floating objects (FOBs) is poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the collective patterns generated by different theoretical models, which either include or exclude social interactions between conspecifics, in the presence of two aggregation sites. The resulting temporal dynamics and distributions of populations were compared to in situ observations of tuna behavior. Our work suggests that social interactions should be incorporated in aggregative behavior to reproduce the temporal patterns observed in the field at both the individual and the group level, challenging the common vision of tuna aggregations around FOBs. Our study argues for additional data to further demonstrate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of these fish aggregations. Understanding the interplay between environmental and social factors in the associative behavior of fish with FOBs is necessary to assess the consequences of the widespread deployment of artificial FOBs by fishermen.
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ISSN (up) 0022-5193 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 393
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Auteur ADJEROUD, M.; GUERECHEAU, A.; VIDAL-DUPIOL, J.; FLOT, J.-F.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; BONHOMME, F.
Titre Genetic diversity, clonality and connectivity in the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis: a multi-scale analysis in an insular, fragmented reef system Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biology
Volume 161 Numéro 3 Pages 531-541
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Résumé Clonality and genetic structure of the coral Pocillopora damicornis sensu lato were assessed using five microsatellites in 12 populations from four islands of the Society Archipelago (French Polynesia) sampled in June 2008. The 427 analysed specimens fell into 132 multilocus genotypes (MLGs), suggesting that asexual reproduction plays an important role in the maintenance of these populations. A haploweb analysis of ITS2 sequences of each MLG was consistent with all of them being conspecific. Genetic differentiation was detected both between and within islands, but when a single sample per MLG was included in the analyses, the populations turned out to be nearly panmictic. These observations provide further evidence of the marked variability in reproductive strategies and genetic structure of P. damicornis throughout its geographic range; comparison with results previously obtained for the congeneric species Pocillopora meandrina underlines the importance of life history traits in shaping the genetic structure of coral populations
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Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Inst Rech Dev, Unite 227, CoReUs2, Noumea 98848, New Caledonia.<br/>Author Address: CORAIL, Lab Excellence, F-66860 Perpignan, France.<br/>Author Address: Univ Perpignan, CNRS, UMR 5244, F-66860 Perpignan, France.<br/>Author Address: Univ Perpignan, UMR 5244, F-66860 Perpignan, France.<br/>Author Address: Max Planck Inst Dynam & Self Org, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany.<br/>Author Address: Inst Francais Rech Exploitat Mer, UMR 212, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Univ Montpellier 2, Inst Sci Evolut, CNRS, UMR 5554, F-34095 Montpellier 5, France.<br/>PB – Springer<br/> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 341
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Auteur VAN BEVEREN, E.; BONHOMMEAU, S.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; BIGOT, J.-L.; BOURDEIX, J.-H.; BROSSET, P.; ROOS, D.; SARAUX, C.
Titre Rapid changes in growth, condition, size and age of small pelagic fish in the Mediterranean Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Marine Biology Revue Abrégée
Volume 161 Numéro 8 Pages 1809-1822
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Résumé Since 2007, the ecosystem of the Gulf of Lions has shifted to a different regime, characterised by a low anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus) biomass and a remarkably high sprat (Sprattus sprattus) biomass. Surprisingly, the abundance and recruitment of anchovy and sardine remained high. To understand which processes (bottom-up or top-down control, etc.) could have caused this shift, we studied the changes in body condition, growth and size and age of anchovy, sardine and sprat over 1984–1985 and 1992–2012, using data from scientific surveys. The annual age structure of anchovy and sardine was estimated using Bayesian mixture models based on size frequency data with priors on the age–length relationship derived from independent otolith readings. The results indicated periods during which anchovy and sardine were in an average (1992–2004), good (2005–2007) or poor (2008–2012) overall state of condition. For sardine, the shift towards smaller fish observed during these past 4 years was explained by a combination of slower growth and the disappearance of older individuals (ages 2+). Despite the increase in biomass of sprat since 2008, indications were found that sprat was also smaller than in the past. As growth and condition decreased and overexploitation has not been documented or suspected for those three species in this area, we propose that the current decline in sardine and anchovy biomass could be due to qualitative and/or quantitative modifications in the planktonic production (i.e. a bottom-up control) or mass mortalities of adults due to an epidemic disease.
Adresse Univ Montpellier 2, Res Unit EME UMR 212, F-34203 Sete, France.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 30335 collection 986
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Auteur Navarro, J.; López, L.; Coll, M.; Barría, C.; Sáez-Liante, R.
Titre Short- and long-term importance of small sharks in the diet of the rare deep-sea shark Dalatias licha Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol
Volume 161 Numéro 7 Pages 1697-1707
Mots-Clés Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Microbiology; Oceanography; Zoology
Résumé Knowing the trophic ecology of marine predators is essential to develop an understanding of their ecological role in ecosystems. Research conducted on deep-sea and threatened shark species is limited. Here, by combining analyses of individual stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the trophic ecology (dietary composition and trophic position) of the kitefin shark Dalatias licha, a deep-sea shark considered as near threatened globally and as data deficient in the Mediterranean Sea. Results revealed the importance of small sharks in the diet of the kitefin shark at short- and long-term scales, although fin-fish, crustaceans and cephalopods were also found. Predation on sharks reveals the high trophic position of the kitefin shark within the food web of the western Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope values from liver and muscle tissues confirmed our results from stomach content analysis and the high trophic position.
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ISSN (up) 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 385
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