|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Bourjea, J.; Clermont, S.; Delgado, A.; Murua, H.; Ruiz, J.; Ciccione, S.; Chavance, P.
Titre Marine turtle interaction with purse-seine fishery in the Atlantic and Indian oceans: Lessons for management Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume 178 Numéro Pages 74-87
Mots-Clés Atlantic Ocean; Bycatch; Fishery impacts; fishery management; Indian Ocean; Marine turtle
Résumé Bycatch of endangered marine turtles is a growing issue for the management of all fisheries, including the oceanic purse-seine fishery. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial and temporal variation in bycatch rates of these species in the entire European purse-seine fishery operating in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The study was based on data collected through observer programs from 1995 to 2011. During that period, a total of 15 913 fishing sets were observed, including 6 515 on Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) and 9 398 on free swimming schools, representing a global coverage of 10.3% and 5.1% of the total fishing activity in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively. Moreover, from 2003 to 2011, 14 124 specific observations were carried out on DFADs to check turtle entanglement in the net covering DFADs. We found that the purse-seine fishery has a very low impact on marine turtles. We estimated that the annual number of individuals incidentally captured was 218 (SD = 150) and 250 (SD = 157) in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively, with more than 75% being released alive. The present study also investigated the impact of DFADs; which is considered a key conservation issue for this fishery. Drifting objects may play a key role in aggregating juveniles of marine turtles, implying the need for improving their construction to avoid entanglement (e.g. avoiding nets in the structure); however, based on our study it is not the main source of incidental captures of marine turtles in this fishery.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 349
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Anderson, P.S.L.; Claverie, T.; Patek, S.N.
Titre Levers And Linkages: Mechanical Trade-Offs In A Power-Amplified System Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolution
Volume 68 Numéro 7 Pages 1919-1933
Mots-Clés amplification; Biomechanics; comparative methods; evolution; kinematic transmission; labrid fishes; mantis shrimp; modularity; morphology; phylogenetic; stomatopods; strike; trade-offs
Résumé Mechanical redundancy within a biomechanical system (e. g., many-to-one mapping) allows morphologically divergent organisms to maintain equivalent mechanical outputs. However, most organisms depend on the integration of more than one biomechanical system. Here, we test whether coupled mechanical systems follow a pattern of amplification (mechanical changes are congruent and evolve toward the same functional extreme) or independence (mechanisms evolve independently). We examined the correlated evolution and evolutionary pathways of the coupled four-bar linkage and lever systems in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) ultrafast raptorial appendages. We examined models of character evolution in the framework of two divergent groups of stomatopods-“smashers” (hammer-shaped appendages) and “spearers” (bladed appendages). Smashers tended to evolve toward force amplification, whereas spearers evolved toward displacement amplification. These findings show that coupled biomechanical systems can evolve synergistically, thereby resulting in functional amplification rather than mechanical redundancy.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0014-3820 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AL3TK<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 40<br/>Anderson, Philip S. L. Claverie, Thomas Patek, S. N.<br/>National Science Foundation [IOS-1149748]<br/>The authors would like to thank S. Price for extensive assistance on phylogenetic comparative methods and L. Revell for help and advice for using his Phytools package for R. We would also like to thank M. Porter, M. Rosario, P. Green, S. Cox, and K. Kagaya for helpful discussions on stomatopod biology as well as two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments, which have greatly improved the quality of this article. We also thank K. Reed (National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC) and S. Keable (Australian Museum of Natural History, Sydney) for access to their specimen collections. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (IOS-1149748) to SNP. The authors declare no conflict of interest.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1156
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur BECHELER, R.; BENKARA, E.; MOALIC, Y.; HILY, C.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.
Titre Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Heredity
Volume 112 Numéro 2 Pages 114-121
Mots-Clés clonality; Seagrass; spatio-temporal genetic structure; Zostera marina
Résumé Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 x 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0018-067x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1139
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D.
Titre Biogeography of freshwater fishes of the Balkan Peninsula Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume 738 Numéro 1 Pages 205-220
Mots-Clés Balkan Peninsula; Beta diversity; Bioregionalisation; Conservation biogeography; Vulnerability; ancient lakes; biodiversity conservation; endemism; freshwater fish; global patterns; mitochondrial-dna sequences; north-america; phylogeography; species richness
Résumé Delineating biogeographical regions is a critical step towards the establishment and evaluation of conservation priorities. In the present study, we analysed the distribution patterns of the freshwater fish of an understudied European biodiversity hotspot, the Balkan Peninsula. Based on the most extensive available database of native freshwater fish species distributions, we performed a hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the major biogeographical regions of the Balkan Peninsula. We also highlighted the 'hottest hotspots' of freshwater fish diversity across the delimited biogeographical regions by describing the patterns of species richness, endemic and vulnerable species; indicator species were also determined. The bioregionalisation scheme consisted of eight groups of drainage basins that correspond to distinct regions of the Balkan Peninsula. Overall, the delineated biogeographical regions varied in terms of species richness, endemism, vulnerability (i.e. extinction threats) and indicator species composition. From a conservation perspective, this study emphasises the prioritisation of areas characterised by high levels of irreplaceability (endemism) and vulnerability (i.e. the Attikobeotia region, Ionian Sea and Prespa Lakes) and stresses the necessity of implementing a network of protected freshwater areas across the Balkan Peninsula.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0018-8158 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 454
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Gutowsky, S.E.; Tremblay, Y.; Kappes, M.A.; Flint, E.N.; Klavitter, J.; Laniawe, L.; Costa, D.P.; Naughton, M.B.; Romano, M.D.; Shaffer, S.A.
Titre Divergent post-breeding distribution and habitat associations of fledgling and adult black-footed Albatrosses Phoebastria nigripes in the North Pacific Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ibis
Volume 156 Numéro 1 Pages 60-72
Mots-Clés dispersal; geolocators; habitat use; Juvenile; Procellariiform; satellite telemetry; seabird
Résumé Past tracking studies of marine animals have primarily targeted adults, biasing our understanding of at-sea habitat use toward older life stages. Anthropogenic threats persist throughout the at-sea ranges of all life stages and it is therefore of interest to population ecologists and managers alike to understand spatiotemporal distributions and possible niche differentiation between age-classes. In albatrosses, particularly little is known about the juvenile life stage when fledglings depart the colonies and venture to sea with no prior experience or parental guidance. We compared the dispersal of 22 fledgling Black-footed Albatross Phoebastria nigripes between 2006 and 2008 using satellite telemetry and 16 adults between 2008 and 2009 using geolocaters from Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. Following tag deployment, all fledglings spent several days within the calm atoll waters, then travelled northward until reaching 750-900km from the colony. At this point, fledgling distributions approached the productive North Pacific Transition Zone (NPTZ). Rather than reaching the high chlorophyll a densities on the leading edge of this zone, however, fledglings remained in areas of low productivity in the subtropical gyre. In contrast, adult albatrosses from the same breeding colony did not utilize the NPTZ at this time of year but rather ranged throughout the highly productive northern periphery of the Pacific Ocean Basin among the shelf regions off Japan and the Aleutian Islands. The dichotomy in habitat use between fledglings and adults from Midway Atoll results in complete spatial segregation between age-classes and suggests ontogenetic niche separation in this species. This research fills a large knowledge gap in at-sea habitat use during a little known yet critical life stage of albatrosses, and contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of differential mortality pressure between age-classes and overall conservation status for the vulnerable Black-footed Albatross.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0019-1019 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 329
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement