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Auteur Rishworth, G.M.; Tremblay, Y.; Green, D.B.; Connan, M.; Pistorius, P.A.
Titre Drivers of Time-Activity Budget Variability during Breeding in a Pelagic Seabird Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS ONE
Volume 9 Numéro 12 Pages
Mots-Clés
Résumé During breeding, animal behaviour is particularly sensitive to environmental and food resource availability. Additionally, factors such as sex, body condition, and offspring developmental stage can influence behaviour. Amongst seabirds, behaviour is generally predictably affected by local foraging conditions and has therefore been suggested as a potentially useful proxy to indicate prey state. However, besides prey availability and distribution, a range of other variables also influence seabird behavior, and these need to be accounted for to increase the signal-to-noise ratio when assessing specific characteristics of the environment based on behavioural attributes. The aim of this study was to use continuous, fine-scale time-activity budget data from a pelagic seabird (Cape gannet, Morus capensis) to determine the influence of intrinsic (sex and body condition) and extrinsic (offspring and time) variables on parent behaviour during breeding. Foraging trip duration and chick provisioning rates were clearly sex-specific and associated with chick developmental stage. Females made fewer, longer foraging trips and spent less time at the nest during chick provisioning. These sex-specific differences became increasingly apparent with chick development. Additionally, parents in better body condition spent longer periods at their nests and those which returned later in the day had longer overall nest attendance bouts. Using recent technological advances, this study provides new insights into the foraging behaviour of breeding seabirds, particularly during the post-guarding phase. The biparental strategy of chick provisioning revealed in this study appears to be an example where the costs of egg development to the female are balanced by paternal-dominated chick provisioning particularly as the chick nears fledging.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1202
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Auteur Shannon, L.; Coll, M.; Bundy, A.; Gascuel, D.; Heymans, J.J.; Kleisner, K.; Lynam, C.P.; Piroddi, C.; Tam, J.; TraversTrolet, M.; Shin, Y.
Titre Trophic level-based indicators to track fishing impacts across marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Ecol Prog Ser
Volume 512 Numéro Pages 115-140
Mots-Clés
Résumé ABSTRACT: Trophic level (TL)-based indicators have been widely used to examine fishing impacts in aquatic ecosystems and the induced biodiversity changes. However, much debate has ensued regarding discrepancies and challenges arising from the use of landings data from commercial fisheries to calculate TL indicators. Subsequent studies have started to examine survey-based and model-based indicators. In this paper, we undertake an extensive evaluation of a variety of TL indicators across 9 well-studied marine ecosystems by making use of model- as well as survey- and catch-based TL indicators. Using detailed regional information and data on fishing history, fishing intensity, and environmental conditions, we evaluate how well TL indicators are capturing fishing effects at the community level of marine ecosystems. Our results highlight that the differences observed between TL indicator values and trends is dependent on the data source and the TL cut-off point used in the calculations and is not attributable to an intrinsic problem with TL-based indicators. All 3 data sources provide useful information about the structural changes in the ecosystem as a result of fishing, but our results indicate that only model-based indicators represent fishing impacts at the whole ecosystem level.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1206
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Auteur Canard, E.F.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Stanko, M.; Miklisova, D.; Gravel, D.
Titre Empirical Evaluation of Neutral Interactions in Host-Parasite Networks Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée American Naturalist
Volume 183 Numéro 4 Pages 468-479
Mots-Clés abundance; animal mutualistic networks; community; dissimilarity; effort; food-web structure; geographical variation; host-parasite network; network structure; neutrality; null model; phylogenetic signal; reconciling niche; sampling; scale-dependence; species abundance distribution
Résumé While niche-based processes have been invoked extensively to explain the structure of interaction networks, recent studies propose that neutrality could also be of great importance. Under the neutral hypothesis, network structure would simply emerge from random encounters between individuals and thus would be directly linked to species abundance. We investigated the impact of species abundance distributions on qualitative and quantitative metrics of 113 host-parasite networks. We analyzed the concordance between neutral expectations and empirical observations at interaction, species, and network levels. We found that species abundance accurately predicts network metrics at all levels. Despite host-parasite systems being constrained by physiology and immunology, our results suggest that neutrality could also explain, at least partially, their structure. We hypothesize that trait matching would determine potential interactions between species, while abundance would determine their realization.
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ISSN (up) 0003-0147 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 573
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Auteur Thiebault, A.; Mullers, R.; Pistorius, P.; Meza-Torres, M.A.; Dubroca, L.; Green, D.; Tremblay, Y.
Titre From colony to first patch: Processes of prey searching and social information in Cape Gannets Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée The Auk
Volume 131 Numéro 4 Pages 595-609
Mots-Clés
Résumé ABSTRACT Seabirds forage in a highly dynamic environment and prey on fish schools that are patchily distributed. Colonially breeding seabirds regularly commute back and forth from their colony to foraging areas and need to acquire information on the location of food before and/or during each foraging trip. The use of conspecifics as cues to locate prey has long been debated, and although the hypothesis was backed up by modeling studies, observations have been contradictory. We deployed GPS devices coupled with micro video cameras on Cape Gannets to observe the social context of foraging seabirds and the influence of conspecifics on the movement of individuals. The Cape Gannets reached their first patch using a succession of flights interrupted by stops on the water, during which the birds were mainly preening. During flight, the birds reacted to conspecifics by changing direction, either flying in the opposite direction of conspecifics that were flying toward the colony or following conspecifics outward. The time to reach the first patch was significantly reduced (by half) when the birds reacted to conspecifics in these different ways, compared with the birds that did not react. The use of conspecifics flying toward the colony to find food is consistent with the hypothesis that colonies can act as a focal place for information transfer, with foragers updating their flying direction when they detect conspecifics flying toward the colony. The fine-scale reaction of seabirds toward each other at sea, and the associated improved foraging efficiency, as well as the division of trips into a succession of flights, constitute elements that indicate the existence and the use of a structured network among foraging Cape Gannets. , RÉSUMÉ Les oiseaux marins se nourrissent dans un environnement fortement dynamique et sur des proies agrégées en bancs. Les oiseaux coloniaux font régulièrement des aller-retours entre la colonie et les zones d'alimentation, et doivent alors acquérir de l'information sur la localisation de leurs proies avant et pendant chaque voyage en mer. L'utilisation de congénères comme source d'information pour localiser des proies a longtemps été débattue, et bien que cette hypothèse soit soutenue par des modèles théoriques, les observations empiriques restent contradictoires. Nous avons déployé des GPS et micro-caméras sur des individus de Morus capensis afin d'observer le contexte social de ces oiseaux au cours de leur recherche alimentaire et l'influence de congénères sur le déplacement des individus. Ceux-ci ont rejoint leur première zone d'alimentation par une succession de vols, interrompus par des arrêts sur l'eau durant lesquels ils faisaient principalement leur toilette. En vol, les oiseaux ont réagi à leurs congénères en modifiant leur direction, soit pour aller en direction opposée de congénères qui volaient vers la colonie, soit pour suivre des congénères au large. Le temps pour rejoindre la première zone d'alimentation était significativement réduit (de moitié) pour les oiseaux ayant réagi à leurs congénères de ces différentes manières, comparé aux oiseaux n'ayant pas réagi. L'utilisation de congénères volant vers la colonie pour trouver de la nourriture est en accord avec l'hypothèse de l'utilisation de la colonie comme point central pour l'échange d'information, à partir duquel les individus en recherche de nourriture pourraient ajuster leur direction de vol au fur et à mesure qu'ils rencontrent des congénères de retour vers la colonie. Les réactions à fine échelle entre oiseaux en mer, associées à l'amélioration de leur efficacité pour trouver de la nourriture, ainsi que le découpage du trajet en vols successifs, constituent des éléments en faveur de l'existence et de l'utilisation d'un réseau structuré de recherche alimentaire chez M. capensis. Mots-clés: biologging, caméra, centre d'information, GPS, oiseaux marins, prédateur à place centrale, recherche alimentaire en réseau, suivi
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ISSN (up) 0004-8038 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1208
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Auteur Capietto, A.; Escalle, L.; Chavance, P.; Dubroca, L.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Murua, H.; Floch, L.; Damiano, A.; Rowat, D.; Mérigot, B.
Titre Mortality of marine megafauna induced by fisheries: Insights from the whale shark, the world’s largest fish Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume 174 Numéro Pages 147-151
Mots-Clés Apparent survival; Bycatch; Hotspots of interaction; marine conservation; Megafauna; Rhincodon typus
Résumé The expansion of human activities is endangering megafauna in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. While large marine vertebrates are often vulnerable and emblematic species, many are considered to be declining, primarily due to fisheries activities. In the open ocean, certain fisheries improve their efficiency of detecting tuna schools by locating and fishing close to some macro-organisms, such as whale sharks or marine mammals. However, collecting accurate data on the accidental capture and mortality of these organisms is a complex process. We analyzed a large database of logbooks from 65 industrial vessels with and without scientific observers on board (487,272 and 16,096 fishing sets since 1980 and 1995 respectively) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Distribution maps of Sightings Per Unit of Effort highlights major hotspots of interactions between the fishery and whale sharks in the coastal area from Gabon to Angola in the Atlantic from April to September, and in the Mozambique Channel in the Indian Ocean between April and May. The incidence of apparent whale shark mortality due to fishery interaction is extremely low (two of the 145 whale sharks encircled by the net died, i.e. 1.38%). However, these two hotspots presented a relatively high rate of incidental whale shark capture. Thus, we underline the importance of estimating long-term post-release mortality rates by tracking individuals and/or by photographic identification to define precise conservation management measures.
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 347
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