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Auteur Kaplan, D.; Chassot, E.; Amande, J.M.; Dueri, S.; Demarcq, H.; Dagorn, L.; Fonteneau, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial management of Indian Ocean tropical tuna fisheries: potential and perspectives Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 71 Numéro 7 Pages (down) 1728-1749  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; conservation; Indian Ocean; Marine protected areas (MPAs); pelagic; spatial management of fisheries; tropical tuna fisheries  
  Résumé Effective use of spatial management in the pelagic realm presents special challenges due to high fish and fisher mobility, limited knowledge and significant governance challenges. The tropical Indian Ocean provides an ideal case study for testing our ability to apply existing data sources to assessing impacts of spatial management on tuna fisheries because of several recent controversial spatial closures. We review the scientific underpinnings of pelagic MPA effects, spatio-temporal patterns of Indian Ocean tuna catch, by catch and fish movements, and the consequences of these for the efficacy of spatial management for Indian Ocean tropical tuna fisheries. The tropical Indian Ocean is characterized by strong environmental fluctuations, regular seasonal variability in catch, large observed tuna displacement distances, relatively uniform catch-per-unit-effort and bycatch rates over space, and high fisher mobility, all of which suggest significant variability and movement in tropical tuna fisheries that are simply not well adapted to static spatial closures. One possible exception to this overall conclusion would be a large time/area closure east of Somalia. If closed for a significant fraction of the year it could reduce purse-seine bycatch and juvenile tuna catch. Dynamic closures following fish migratory patterns are possible, but more focused information on fish movements will be needed for effective implementation. Fortunately, several recent improvements in conventional fishery management and reporting will likely enhance our ability to evaluate spatial and non-spatial management options in the near future, particularly as pertaining to bycatch species.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1199  
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Auteur Navarro, J.; López, L.; Coll, M.; Barría, C.; Sáez-Liante, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Short- and long-term importance of small sharks in the diet of the rare deep-sea shark Dalatias licha Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol  
  Volume 161 Numéro 7 Pages (down) 1697-1707  
  Mots-Clés Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Microbiology; Oceanography; Zoology  
  Résumé Knowing the trophic ecology of marine predators is essential to develop an understanding of their ecological role in ecosystems. Research conducted on deep-sea and threatened shark species is limited. Here, by combining analyses of individual stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the trophic ecology (dietary composition and trophic position) of the kitefin shark Dalatias licha, a deep-sea shark considered as near threatened globally and as data deficient in the Mediterranean Sea. Results revealed the importance of small sharks in the diet of the kitefin shark at short- and long-term scales, although fin-fish, crustaceans and cephalopods were also found. Predation on sharks reveals the high trophic position of the kitefin shark within the food web of the western Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope values from liver and muscle tissues confirmed our results from stomach content analysis and the high trophic position.  
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  ISSN 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 385  
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Auteur ROUYER, T.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; HIDALGO, M.; STENSETH, N.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Combined effects of exploitation and temperature on fish stocks in the Northeast Atlantic Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Ices Journal Of Marine Science Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 71 Numéro 7 Pages (down) 1554-1562  
  Mots-Clés combined climate/exploitation effect; exploitation; fish stocks; Northeast Atlantic; response to climate; time-series  
  Résumé Fish stock fluctuations are affected by two potentially confounding forces: the removal of individuals by fisheries and climatic variations affecting the productivity of fish populations. Disentangling the relative importance of these forces has thus been a question of primary importance for fisheries management and conservation. Through the analysis of long-term time-series for 27 fish stocks from the Northeast Atlantic, the present study shows that the sign and intensity of the effect of temperature on biomass are dependent on the geographical location: the stocks located at the southernmost and northernmost latitudes of our study displayed stronger associations with temperature than the stocks located in the middle range of latitudes. As a consequence, the investigation of the combined effects of exploitation and the environment revealed that the stocks at the northern/southern boundaries of the spatial extent of the species were more prone to combined effects. The interplay between geographic location, climate and exploitation thus plays a significant role in fish stock productivity, which is generally ignored during assessment, thus affecting management procedures.  
  Adresse Inst Marine Res, Dept Coastal Zone Studies, Flodevigen Res Stn, N-4817 His, Norway.  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Oxford Univ Press Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 34107 collection 983  
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Auteur Freon, P.; Avadi, A.; Soto, W.M.; Negron, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Environmentally extended comparison table of large-versus small- and medium-scale fisheries : the case of the Peruvian anchoveta fleet Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences  
  Volume 71 Numéro 10 Pages (down) 1459-1474  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé Literature on small-scale fisheries usually depicts them as preferable over large-scale-industrial fisheries regarding societal benefits (jobs, jobs per investment) and relative fuel efficiency (e. g., Thomson 1980). We propose an environmentally extended Thomson table for comparing the Peruvian anchoveta (Engraulis ringens) fleets of purse seiners, backed up by methodological information and augmented with life cycle assessment (LCA)-based environmental performance information, as a more comprehensive device for comparing fleets competing for the same resource pool. Findings from LCA and a previous study on the anchoveta steel fleet together allowed characterizing the whole Peruvian anchoveta fishery. These results, along with socioeconomic indicators, are used to build an environmentally extended Thomson table of the fleet's main segments: the steel industrial, the wooden industrial, and the wooden small-and medium-scale (SMS) fleets. In contrast with the world figure, the Peruvian SMS fleets show a fuel performance nearly two times worse than the industrial fleets, due to economies of scale of the latter (although the small-scale segment itself (<10 m(3)) performs similarly to the industrial steel fleet). Furthermore, the absolute number of jobs provided by the industrial fisheries is much larger in Peru than those provided by the SMS fisheries. This is due to the relatively larger development of the industrial fishery, but as in previous studies, the SMS fleets generate more employment per tonne landed than the industrial fleet, as well as more food fish and less discards at sea.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1149  
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Auteur Villeger, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Functional homogenization exceeds taxonomic homogenization among European fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 23 Numéro 12 Pages (down) 1450-1460  
  Mots-Clés beta-diversity; exotic species; functional diversity; Non-native species; taxonomic dissimilarity; translocation  
  Résumé Aim Human activities and the consequent extirpations of native species and introductions of non-native species have been modifying the composition of species assemblages throughout the world. These anthropogenic impacts have modified the richness of assemblages as well as the biological dissimilarity among them. However, while changes in taxonomic dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for species composition) have been assessed intensively during the last decade there are still few assessments of changes in functional dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for the diversity of biological traits). Here, we assess the temporal changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarities for freshwater fish assemblages across Europe. Location Western Palaearctic, 137 river basins. Methods The Jaccard index was used to quantify the changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarity. We then partitioned dissimilarity to extract its turnover component and measured the changes in the contribution of turnover to dissimilarity. Results Functional homogenization exceeded taxonomic homogenization six-fold. More importantly, we found only a moderate positive correlation between these changes. For instance, 40% of assemblages that experienced taxonomic differentiation were actually functionally homogenized. Taxonomic and functional homogenizations were stronger when the historical level of taxonomic dissimilarity among assemblages was high and when a high number of non-native species were introduced in the assemblages. Moreover, translocated species (i.e. non-native species originating from Europe) played a stronger role than exotic species (i.e. those coming from outside Europe) in this homogenization process, while extirpation did not play a significant role. Main conclusions Change in taxonomic diversity cannot be used to predict changes in functional diversity. In addition, as functional diversity has been proven to be a better indicator of ecosystem functioning and stability than taxonomic diversity, further studies are required to test the potential effects of functional homogenization at the local scale.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1178  
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