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Auteur Pauly, D.; Ulman, A.; Piroddi, C.; Bultel, E.; Coll, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre ‘Reported’ versus ‘likely’ fisheries catches of four Mediterranean countries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Scientia Marina  
  Volume 78 Numéro S1 Pages 11-17  
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  ISSN 1886-8134, 0214-8358 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 386  
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Auteur Schwerdtner Máñez, K.; Holm, P.; Blight, L.; Coll, M.; MacDiarmid, A.; Ojaveer, H.; Poulsen, B.; Tull, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The Future of the Oceans Past: Towards a Global Marine Historical Research Initiative Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS ONE  
  Volume 9 Numéro 7 Pages  
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  Résumé Historical research is playing an increasingly important role in marine sciences. Historical data are also used in policy making and marine resource management, and have helped to address the issue of shifting baselines for numerous species and ecosystems. Although many important research questions still remain unanswered, tremendous developments in conceptual and methodological approaches are expected to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the global history of human interactions with life in the seas. Based on our experiences and knowledge from the “History of Marine Animal Populations” project, this paper identifies the emerging research topics for future historical marine research. It elaborates on concepts and tools which are expected to play a major role in answering these questions, and identifies geographical regions which deserve future attention from marine environmental historians and historical ecologists.  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 387  
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Auteur Ternon, J.F.; Roberts, M.J.; Morris, T.; Hancke, L.; Backeberg, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre In situ measured current structures of the eddy field in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume Numéro Pages 10-26  
  Mots-Clés Geostrophic currents; Mesoscale eddies; Mozambique Channel; S-ADCP measurements; Wind driven circulation  
  Résumé Circulation and the related biological production have been studied during five cruises conducted in the Mozambique Channel (MZC) between 2005 and 2010. The circulation in the MZC is known to be highly turbulent, favouring enhanced primary production as a result of mesoscale eddy dynamics, and connectivity throughout the Channel due to the variable currents associated with migrating eddies. This paper presents the results of in situ measurements that characterize the horizontal and vertical currents in the surface and subsurface layers (0–500 m). The in situ data were analysed together with the geostrophic eddy field observed from satellite altimeter measurements. Different circulation regimes were investigated, including the “classical” anticyclonic eddy generated at the Channel narrows (16°S), the enhancement of southward migrating eddies by merging with structures (both cyclonic and anticyclonic) formed in the east of the Channel, and the presence of a fully developed cyclonic eddy at the Channel narrows. Comparison between in situ measurements (S-ADCP and velocities derived from surface drifters) and the geostrophic current derived from sea surface height measurements indicated that the latter can provide a reliable, quantitative description of eddy driven circulation in the MZC, with the exception that these currents are weaker by as much 30%. It is also suggested from in situ observation (drifters) that the departure from geostrophy of the surface circulation might be linked to strong wind conditions. Finally, our observations highlight that a-geostrophic currents need to be considered in future research to facilitate a more comprehensive description of the circulation in this area.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection The Mozambique Channel: Mesoscale Dynamics and Ecosystem Responses Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection 100 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 388  
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Auteur Bertrand, A.; Grados, D.; Colas, F.; Bertrand, S.; Capet, X.; Chaigneau, A.; Vargas, G.; Mousseigne, A.; Fablet, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Broad impacts of fine-scale dynamics on seascape structure from zooplankton to seabirds Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat Commun  
  Volume 5 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Biological sciences; Ecology; Oceanography  
  Résumé In marine ecosystems, like most natural systems, patchiness is the rule. A characteristic of pelagic ecosystems is that their ‘substrate’ consists of constantly moving water masses, where ocean surface turbulence creates ephemeral oases. Identifying where and when hotspots occur and how predators manage those vagaries in their preyscape is challenging because wide-ranging observations are lacking. Here we use a unique data set, gathering high-resolution and wide-range acoustic and GPS-tracking data. We show that the upper ocean dynamics at scales less than 10 km play the foremost role in shaping the seascape from zooplankton to seabirds. Short internal waves (100 m–1 km) play a major role, while submesoscale (~1–20 km) and mesoscale (~20–100 km) turbulence have a comparatively modest effect. Predicted changes in surface stratification due to global change are expected to have an impact on the number and intensity of physical structures and thus biological interactions from plankton to top predators.  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 389  
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Auteur Arnaud-Haond, S.; Moalic, Y.; Barnabé, C.; Ayala, F.J.; Tibayrenc, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Discriminating Micropathogen Lineages and Their Reticulate Evolution through Graph Theory-Based Network Analysis: The Case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the Agent of Chagas Disease Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS ONE  
  Volume 9 Numéro 8 Pages  
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  Résumé Micropathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasitic protozoa) share a common trait, which is partial clonality, with wide variance in the respective influence of clonality and sexual recombination on the dynamics and evolution of taxa. The discrimination of distinct lineages and the reconstruction of their phylogenetic history are key information to infer their biomedical properties. However, the phylogenetic picture is often clouded by occasional events of recombination across divergent lineages, limiting the relevance of classical phylogenetic analysis and dichotomic trees. We have applied a network analysis based on graph theory to illustrate the relationships among genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasitic protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, to identify major lineages and to unravel their past history of divergence and possible recombination events. At the scale of T. cruzi subspecific diversity, graph theory-based networks applied to 22 isoenzyme loci (262 distinct Multi-Locus-Enzyme-Electrophoresis -MLEE) and 19 microsatellite loci (66 Multi-Locus-Genotypes -MLG) fully confirms the high clustering of genotypes into major lineages or “near-clades”. The release of the dichotomic constraint associated with phylogenetic reconstruction usually applied to Multilocus data allows identifying putative hybrids and their parental lineages. Reticulate topology suggests a slightly different history for some of the main “near-clades”, and a possibly more complex origin for the putative hybrids than hitherto proposed. Finally the sub-network of the near-clade T. cruzi I (28 MLG) shows a clustering subdivision into three differentiated lesser near-clades (“Russian doll pattern”), which confirms the hypothesis recently proposed by other investigators. The present study broadens and clarifies the hypotheses previously obtained from classical markers on the same sets of data, which demonstrates the added value of this approach. This underlines the potential of graph theory-based network analysis for describing the nature and relationships of major pathogens, thereby opening stimulating prospects to unravel the organization, dynamics and history of major micropathogen lineages.  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 390  
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