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Auteur (up) Cresson, P.; Fabri, M.-C.; Bouchoucha, M.; Brach Papa, C.; Chavanon, F.; Jadaud, A.; Knoery, J.; MARCO-MIRALLES, F.; Cossa, D. url  openurl
  Titre Mercury in organisms from the Northwestern Mediterranean slope: Importance of food sources Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 497-498 Numéro Pages 229-238  
  Mots-Clés Continental slope; Depth; Sharks; Stable Isotopes; Teleosts; Trophic webs  
  Résumé Mercury (Hg) is a global threat for marine ecosystems, especially within the Mediterranean Sea. The concern is higher for deep-sea organisms, as the Hg concentration in their tissues is commonly high. To assess the influence of food supply at two trophic levels, total Hg concentrations and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in 7 species (4 teleosts, 2 sharks, and 1 crustacean) sampled on the upper part of the continental slope of the Gulf of Lions (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea), at depths between 284 and 816 m. Mean Hg concentrations ranged from 1.30 ± 0.61 to 7.13 ± 7.09 μg g− 1 dry mass, with maximum values observed for small-spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula. For all species except blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou, Hg concentrations were above the health safety limits for human consumption defined by the European Commission, with a variable proportion of the individuals exceeding limits (from 23% for the Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus to 82% for the blackbelly rosefish Helicolenus dactylopterus). Measured concentrations increased with increasing trophic levels. Carbon isotopic ratios measured for these organisms demonstrated that settling phytoplanktonic organic matter is not only the main source fueling trophic webs but also the carrier of Hg to this habitat. Inter- and intraspecific variations of Hg concentrations revealed the importance of feeding patterns in Hg bioaccumulation. In addition, biological parameters, such as growth rate or bathymetric range explain the observed contamination trends.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 376  
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Auteur (up) Cuif, M.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lefèvre, J.; Faure, V.M.; Caillaud, M.; Verley, P.; Vigliola, L.; Lett, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Wind-induced variability in larval retention in a coral reef system: a biophysical modelling study in the South-West Lagoon of New Caledonia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Progress in Oceanography  
  Volume 122 Numéro Pages 105-115  
  Mots-Clés Biophysical model; Dascyllus aruanus; Homing; Larval dispersal; New Caledonia; Precompetency; Wind-driven transport  
  Résumé In the present work, a biophysical dispersal model is used to understand the role of the physical environment in determining reef fish larval dispersal patterns in the South-West Lagoon of New Caledonia. We focus on a reef fish species, the humbug damselfish Dascyllus aruanus, to investigate seasonal variability of simulated larval retention at the scale of a reef patch and at the scale of the lagoon, and to explore links between larval retention and wind variability. The model shows that retention exhibits considerable temporal variability and periodically reaches values much larger than anticipated. Non-zero larval settlement occurs over a large part of the lagoon. Nevertheless, settlement values decrease quickly away from the natal reef and mean dispersal distances are of order 25-35 km. Cross-correlation analyses indicate that weather conditions characterized by strong south east trade winds lead to low retention rates at both local (reef) and regional (lagoon) scales. By contrast, subtropical weather conditions characterized by weak winds result in high retention rates. These results suggest that large-scale weather regimes can be used as proxies for larval retention of the humbug damselfish in the South-West Lagoon of New Caledonia. Nevertheless, relatively small mean dispersal distances suggest that meta-population dynamics occur on relatively small spatial scales.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 318  
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Auteur (up) Cuif, M.; Keller, F.; Chateau, O.; Kaplan, D.; Labonne, M.; Lett, C.; Vigliola, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Evaluation of transgenerational isotope labeling of embryonic otoliths in a coral reef damselfish with single and repeated injections of enriched (137)Barium Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 459 Numéro Pages 151-159  
  Mots-Clés Barium isotopes; Connectivity; Dascyllus aruanus; La-Icp-Ms; microchemistry; Otolith; Transgenerational marking  
  Résumé Quantifying the larval dispersal component of population connectivity is extremely challenging due to the many difficulties associated with directly observing larvae in their marine environment. Transgenerational isotope labeling is a recent empirical technique that addresses this challenge. It relies on the transmission of an artificially enriched stable isotope (e.g., Ba-137) from gravid females to the embryonic otoliths of their offspring, allowing for mass permanent marking of larvae. Before implementing transgenerational isotope labeling in the wild, it is essential to investigate the transmission longevity of the mark from females to larvae and to assess the potential negative effects on females and their offspring. We injected females of the Humbug damselfish, Dascyllus aruanus, with an enriched Ba-137 solution and reared the resulting progeny to test the marking success and the transmission longevity of the mark, as well as determine potential effects of transgenerational isotope labeling on spawning frequency and size of 1-day eggs and 2-day larvae. Three different single-injection dosages (0.5, 1 and 5 mu g of Ba-137 g(-1) fish weight) were tested, as well as monthly repeated injections of the lowest dosage over a whole reproductive season. We implemented a new method that allows extracting otoliths of newly hatched larvae and analyzing them using laser ablation coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We showed that for D. aruanus, injection with a low dose (0.5 mu g Ba-137 g(-1), fish weight) produced consistently significantly marked larvae with a half-life for successful enriched Ba mark transmission of approximately 1 month, and that monthly repeated injections of this dose did not negatively impact spawning success or condition of eggs and larvae. Monthly repeated injections of enriched Ba isotope injections at 0.5 mu g Ba-137 g(-1) fish weight will therefore present an effective means of mass marking D. aruanus larvae throughout an entire reproductive season.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 357  
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Auteur (up) CURY, P.M.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; FIGUET, S.; BONHOMMEAU, S. url  openurl
  Titre Resolving Hjort's Dilemma How Is Recruitment Related to Spawning Stock Biomass in Marins Fish? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 27 Numéro 4 Pages 42-47  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé The relationship between spawning fish abundance and the number of offspring, the so-called stock-recruitment relationship, is crucial for fisheries management and conservation measures. Using the most comprehensive data set ever assembled, we quantify this relationship for 211 fish stocks worldwide, revealing a global pattern with a pervasive asymptotic shape that shows increasing recruitment reaching an upper limit for values around half to two-thirds of parental biomass. This corroborates previous theoretical and modeling results. However, parental biomass is a predictor for only 5% to 15% of the variance in recruitment, demonstrating the weak predictive power of the stock-recruitment relationship in marine fish populations. Thus, there is a need to move rapidly toward models that integrate environmental conditions and species interactions in fisheries stock assessment and management, as suggested by Johan Hjort 100 years ago.  
  Adresse Institut français de recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (IFREMER), Sète, France  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur The Oceanography Society Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1042-8275 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 36441 collection 982  
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Auteur (up) D'Agata, S.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Andrefouet, S.; Bellwood, D.R.; Cinner, J.E.; Cowman, P.F.; Kronen, M.; Pinca, S.; Vigliola, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Human-Mediated Loss of Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity in Coral Reef Fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Current Biology  
  Volume 24 Numéro 5 Pages 555-560  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; communities; evolutionary; great-barrier-reef; land-use; parrotfishes; patterns; productivity; resilience  
  Résumé Beyond the loss of species richness [1-3], human activities may also deplete the breadth of evolutionary history (phylogenetic diversity) and the diversity of roles (functional diversity) carried out by species within communities, two overlooked components of biodiversity. Both are, however, essential to sustain ecosystem functioning and the associated provision of ecosystem services, particularly under fluctuating environmental conditions [1-7]. We quantified the effect of human activities on the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional diversity of fish communities in coral reefs, while teasing apart the influence of biogeography and habitat along a gradient of human pressure across the Pacific Ocean. We detected nonlinear relationships with significant breaking points in the impact of human population density on phylogenetic and functional diversity of parrot-fishes, at 25 and 15 inhabitants/km(2), respectively, while parrot-fish species richness decreased linearly along the same population gradient. Over the whole range, species richness decreased by 11.7%, while phylogenetic and functional diversity dropped by 35.8% and 46.6%, respectively. Our results call for caution when using species richness as a benchmark for measuring the status of ecosystems since it appears to be less responsive to variation in human population densities than its phylogenetic and functional counterparts, potentially imperiling the functioning of coral reef ecosystems.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 645  
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