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Auteur (down) Walker, T.R.; Grant, J.; Weise, A.M.; McKindsey, C.W.; Callier, M.D.; Richard, M.
Titre Influence of suspended mussel lines on sediment erosion and resuspension in Lagune de la Grande Entree, Iles-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec, Canada Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture
Volume 433 Numéro Pages 450-457
Mots-Clés Aquaculture; Biodeposits; biogeochemical fluxes; culture; dynamics; intertidal cohesive sediments; lagoon; Mytilus; Mytilus edulis; Particle; rates; Resuspension; Sediment erosion; Shear velocity; size; stability
Résumé Downward fluxes of organically rich biodeposits under suspended mussel lines can cause benthic impacts such as changes in benthic community structure or microbial mat production. Quantifying sediment erosion in these coastal ecosystems is important for understanding how fluxes of organic matter and mussel biodeposits contribute to benthic pelagic coupling. Critical shear velocity (u(crit)*(t)), erosion rates and particle size distributions of resuspended sediment were measured at four stations distributed along a transect perpendicular to a mussel farm in Lagune de la Grande Entree, Iles-de-la-Madeleine (Quebec, Canada). Stations were selected underneath the outer-most mussel line (0 m) and at distances of 15,30 m and at a reference station (500 m) further along the transect. Shear velocity was measured using a calibrated portable Particle Erosion Simulator, also referred to as the BEAST (Benthic Environmental Assessment Sediment Tool). Undisturbed sediment cores obtained by divers were exposed to shear stress to compare differences between stations. Erosion sequences indicated no significant differences in u(crit)* between stations, but there were significant differences in erosion rates beneath mussel lines compared to other stations. Erosion rates were the highest in cores from beneath mussel lines, but paradoxically had the lowest u(crit)* Mean erosion rates at u*crit varied between 25 and 47 g m(-2) min(-1) and critical erosion thresholds varied between 1.58 and 1.73 cm s(-1), which compare with intensive mussel culture sites elsewhere in eastern Canada. Significant differences existed in biotic and abiotic properties of sediments which could explain variation in maximum erosion rates within and between stations. Particle sizes measured by videography of resuspended sediment at different shear velocities ranged from 02 to 3.0 mm. Quantifying sediment erosion from intact marine sediments helps to improve our mechanistic understanding of these processes, and the BEAST further contributes to predictive capability in benthic pelagic coupling modeling. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AQ1GH<br/>Times Cited: 0<br/>Cited Reference Count: 39<br/>Walker, Tony R. Grant, Jon Weise, Andrea M. McKindsey, Christopher W. Callier, Myriam D. Richard, Marion<br/>Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC); Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program (ACRDP); Societe de Development de l'Industrie Maricole (SODIM); Fisheries and Oceans Canada<br/>We thank MAPAQ and B. Hargrave for the collaboration and C. Eloquin and associates for the permission to use their site. Funding was provided by the Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program (ACRDP), the Societe de Development de l'Industrie Maricole (SODIM) and the Fisheries and Oceans Canada. We thank B. Schofield and M. Merrimen for the fabrication of the BEAST which formed part of the equipment necessary for the Canadian Arctic Shelves Exchange Study (CASES), a Research Network funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).<br/>Elsevier science bv<br/>Amsterdam</p> Approuvé pas de
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Auteur (down) Villeger, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S.
Titre Functional homogenization exceeds taxonomic homogenization among European fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 23 Numéro 12 Pages 1450-1460
Mots-Clés beta-diversity; exotic species; functional diversity; Non-native species; taxonomic dissimilarity; translocation
Résumé Aim Human activities and the consequent extirpations of native species and introductions of non-native species have been modifying the composition of species assemblages throughout the world. These anthropogenic impacts have modified the richness of assemblages as well as the biological dissimilarity among them. However, while changes in taxonomic dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for species composition) have been assessed intensively during the last decade there are still few assessments of changes in functional dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for the diversity of biological traits). Here, we assess the temporal changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarities for freshwater fish assemblages across Europe. Location Western Palaearctic, 137 river basins. Methods The Jaccard index was used to quantify the changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarity. We then partitioned dissimilarity to extract its turnover component and measured the changes in the contribution of turnover to dissimilarity. Results Functional homogenization exceeded taxonomic homogenization six-fold. More importantly, we found only a moderate positive correlation between these changes. For instance, 40% of assemblages that experienced taxonomic differentiation were actually functionally homogenized. Taxonomic and functional homogenizations were stronger when the historical level of taxonomic dissimilarity among assemblages was high and when a high number of non-native species were introduced in the assemblages. Moreover, translocated species (i.e. non-native species originating from Europe) played a stronger role than exotic species (i.e. those coming from outside Europe) in this homogenization process, while extirpation did not play a significant role. Main conclusions Change in taxonomic diversity cannot be used to predict changes in functional diversity. In addition, as functional diversity has been proven to be a better indicator of ecosystem functioning and stability than taxonomic diversity, further studies are required to test the potential effects of functional homogenization at the local scale.
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ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium
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Auteur (down) Viblanc, V.A.; Saraux, C.; Malosse, N.; Groscolas, R.
Titre Energetic adjustments in freely breeding-fasting king penguins: does colony density matter? Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Functional Ecology
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés body temperature; energy expenditure; fasting; heart rate; physical activity; Seabird; social density; Stress
Résumé * For seabirds that forage at sea but breed while fasting on land, successful reproduction depends on the effective management of energy stores. Additionally, breeding often means aggregating in dense colonies where social stress may affect energy budgets. * Male king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) fast for remarkably long periods (up to 1·5 months) while courting and incubating ashore. Although their fasting capacities have been well investigated in captivity, we still know very little about the energetics of freely breeding birds. * We monitored heart rate (HR, a proxy to energy expenditure), body temperature and physical activity of male king penguins during their courtship and first incubation shift in a colony of some 24 000 freely breeding pairs. Males were breeding either under low but increasing colony density (early breeders) or at high and stable density (late breeders). * In early breeders, daily mean and resting HR decreased during courtship but increased again 3 days before egg laying and during incubation. In late breeders, HR remained stable throughout this same breeding period. Interestingly, the daily increase in resting HR we observed in early breeders was strongly associated with a marked increase in colony density over time. This finding remained significant even after controlling for climate effects. * In both early and late breeders, courtship and incubation were associated with a progressive decrease in physical activity, whereas core body temperature remained unchanged. * We discuss the roles of decreased physical activity and thermoregulatory strategies in sustaining the long courtship–incubation fast of male king penguins. We also draw attention to a potential role of conspecific density in affecting the energetics of breeding-fasting seabirds, that is, a potential energy cost to coloniality.
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Auteur (down) Van Dover, C.L.; Aronson, J.; Pendleton, L.; Smith, S.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Moreno-Mateos, D.; Barbier, E.; Billett, D.; Bowers, K.; Danovaro, R.; Edwards, A.; Kellert, S.; Morato, T.; Pollard, E.; Rogers, A.; Warner, R.
Titre Ecological Restoration in the Deep Sea: Desiderata Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume 44 Numéro Pages 98-106
Mots-Clés Cold-water corals; Deep-sea resource use; Hydrothermal vents; Marine policy; Restoration science
Résumé An era of expanding deep-ocean industrialization is before us, with policy makers establishing governance frameworks for sustainable management of deep-sea resources while scientists learn more about the ecological structure and functioning of the largest biome on the planet. Missing from discussion of the stewardship of the deep ocean is ecological restoration. If existing activities in the deep sea continue or are expanded and new deep-ocean industries are developed, there is need to consider what is required to minimize or repair resulting damages to the deep-sea environment. In addition, thought should be given as to how any past damage can be rectified. This paper develops the discourse on deep-sea restoration and offers guidance on planning and implementing ecological restoration projects for deep-sea ecosystems that are already, or are at threat of becoming, degraded, damaged or destroyed. Two deep-sea restoration case studies or scenarios are described (deep-sea stony corals on the Darwin Mounds off the west coast of Scotland, deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) and are contrasted with on-going saltmarsh restoration in San Francisco Bay. For these case studies, a set of socio-economic, ecological, and technological decision parameters that might favor (or not) their restoration are examined. Costs for hypothetical restoration scenarios in the deep sea are estimated and first indications suggest they may be two to three orders of magnitude greater per hectare than costs for restoration efforts in shallow-water marine systems.
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Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA.<br/>Author Address: CNRS, Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, F-34033 Montpellier, France.<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Inst Environm Policy Solut, Durham, NC 27708 USA.<br/>Author Address: Nautilus Minerals, Milton, Qld, Australia.<br/>Author Address: IFREMER, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Stanford Univ, Woodside, CA 94062 USA.<br/>Author Address: Dept Econ & Finance, Laramie, WY 82071 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Southampton, Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.<br/>Author Address: Biohabitats, N Charleston, SC 29405 USA.<br/>Author Address: Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Life & Environm Sci, I-601321 Ancona, Italy.<br/>Author Address: Newcastle Univ, Sch Biol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England.<br/>Author Address: Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Acores, Dept Oceanog & Pescas, Ctr IMAR, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: LARSyS Associated Lab, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: EURC, Biodivers Consultancy, Cambridge CB2 1RR, England.<br/>Author Address: Dept Zool, Oxford OX1 3PS, England.<br/>Author Address: Univ Wollongong, Australian Natl Ctr Ocean Resources & Secur, North Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.<br/>PB – Elsevier Sci Ltd<br/> Approuvé pas de
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Auteur (down) van der Geest, M.; Sall, A.A.; Ely, S.O.; Nauta, R.W.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.
Titre Nutritional and reproductive strategies in a chemsoymbiotic bivalve living in a tropical intertidal seagrass bed Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series
Volume 501 Numéro Pages 113-126
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