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Auteur Ternon, J.F.; Roberts, M.J.; Morris, T.; Hancke, L.; Backeberg, B.
Titre In situ measured current structures of the eddy field in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume Numéro Pages 10-26
Mots-Clés Geostrophic currents; Mesoscale eddies; Mozambique Channel; S-ADCP measurements; Wind driven circulation
Résumé Circulation and the related biological production have been studied during five cruises conducted in the Mozambique Channel (MZC) between 2005 and 2010. The circulation in the MZC is known to be highly turbulent, favouring enhanced primary production as a result of mesoscale eddy dynamics, and connectivity throughout the Channel due to the variable currents associated with migrating eddies. This paper presents the results of in situ measurements that characterize the horizontal and vertical currents in the surface and subsurface layers (0–500 m). The in situ data were analysed together with the geostrophic eddy field observed from satellite altimeter measurements. Different circulation regimes were investigated, including the “classical” anticyclonic eddy generated at the Channel narrows (16°S), the enhancement of southward migrating eddies by merging with structures (both cyclonic and anticyclonic) formed in the east of the Channel, and the presence of a fully developed cyclonic eddy at the Channel narrows. Comparison between in situ measurements (S-ADCP and velocities derived from surface drifters) and the geostrophic current derived from sea surface height measurements indicated that the latter can provide a reliable, quantitative description of eddy driven circulation in the MZC, with the exception that these currents are weaker by as much 30%. It is also suggested from in situ observation (drifters) that the departure from geostrophy of the surface circulation might be linked to strong wind conditions. Finally, our observations highlight that a-geostrophic currents need to be considered in future research to facilitate a more comprehensive description of the circulation in this area.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection The Mozambique Channel: Mesoscale Dynamics and Ecosystem Responses Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection 100 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 388
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Auteur Sabarros, P.S.; Grémillet, D.; Demarcq, H.; Moseley, C.; Pichegru, L.; Mullers, R.H.E.; Stenseth, N.C.; Machu, E.
Titre Fine-scale recognition and use of mesoscale fronts by foraging Cape gannets in the Benguela upwelling region Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume Numéro Pages 77-84
Mots-Clés Area-restricted search; Behavioral shift; Environmental cue; Feeding activity; Fractal landscape; Morus capensis; Oceanographic fronts; seabird; South Africa; southern Benguela
Résumé Oceanic structures such as mesoscale fronts may become hotspots of biological activity through concentration and enrichment processes. These fronts generally attract fish and may therefore be targeted by marine top-predators. In the southern Benguela upwelling system, such fronts might be used as environmental cues by foraging seabirds. In this study we analyzed high-frequency foraging tracks (GPS, 1 s sampling) of Cape gannets Morus capensis from two colonies located on the west and east coast of South Africa in relation to mesoscale fronts detected on daily high-resolution chlorophyll-a maps (MODIS, 1 km). We tested the association of (i) searching behavior and (ii) diving activity of foraging birds with mesoscale fronts. We found that Cape gannets shift from transiting to area-restricted search mode (ARS) at a distance from fronts ranging between 2 and 11 km (median is 6.7 km). This suggests that Cape gannets may be able to sense fronts (smell or vision) or other predators, and that such detection triggers an intensified investigation of their surroundings (i.e. ARS). Also we found that diving probability increases near fronts in 11 out of 20 tracks investigated (55%), suggesting that Cape gannets substantially use fronts for feeding; in the remaining cases (45%), birds may have used other cues for feeding including fishing vessels, particularly for gannets breeding on the west coast. We demonstrated in this study that oceanographic structures such as mesoscale fronts are important environmental cues used by a foraging seabird within the rich waters of an upwelling system. There is now need for further investigations on how Cape gannets actually detect these fronts.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Fronts, Fish and Top Predators Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection 107 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1204
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Auteur NIEBLAS, A.-E.; DEMARCQ, H.; DRUSHKA, K.; SLOYAN, B.; BONHOMMEAU, S.
Titre Front variability and surface ocean features of the presumed southern bluefin tuna spawning grounds in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep-sea Research Part II-topical Studies In Oceanography
Volume 107 Numéro Pages 64-76
Mots-Clés Front detection index; Indo-Australian region; Oceanic fronts; Southern bluefin tuna Thunnus maccoyii; Spawning grounds (10 degrees S-20 degrees S 105 degrees E-125 degrees E); Tropical southeast Indian Ocean
Résumé The southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii) is an ecologically and economically valuable fish. However, surprisingly little is known about its critical early life history, a period when mortality is several orders of magnitude higher than at any other life stage, and when larvae are highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Ocean fronts can be important in creating favourable spawning conditions, as they are a convergence of water masses with different properties that can concentrate planktonic particles and lead to enhanced productivity. In this study, we examine the front activity within the only region where SBT have been observed to spawn: the tropical southeast Indian Ocean between Indonesia and Australia (10 degrees S-20 degrees S, 105 degrees E-125 degrees E). We investigate front activity and its relationship to ocean dynamics and surface features of the region. Results are also presented for the entire Indian Ocean (30 degrees N-45 degrees S, 20 degrees E-140 degrees E) to provide a background context. We use an extension of the Cayula and Cornillon algorithm to detect ocean fronts from satellite images of sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a). Front occurrence represents the probability of occurrence of a front at each pixel of an image. Front intensity represents the magnitude of the difference between the two water masses that make up a front. Relative to the rest of the Indian Ocean, both SST and chl-a fronts in the offshore spawning region are persistent in occurrence and weak in intensity. Front occurrence and intensity along the Australian coast are high, with persistent and intense fronts found along the northwest and west coasts. Fronts in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean are shown to have strong annual variability and some moderate interannual variability. SST front occurrence is found to lead the Southern Oscillation Index by one year, potentially linked to warming and wind anomalies in the Indian Ocean. The surface ocean characteristics of the offshore SBT spawning region are found to be particularly stable compared to the rest of the Indian Ocean in terms of stable SST, low eddy kinetic energy, i.e., low mesoscale eddy activity, and low chl-a. However, this region has high front occurrence, but low front intensity of both SST and chl-a fronts. The potential impact of these oceanic features for SBT spawning is discussed.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1131
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Auteur Hancke, L.; Roberts, M.J.; Ternon, J.-F.
Titre Surface drifter trajectories highlight flow pathways in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 27-37
Mots-Clés Frontal flow; Mesoscale eddies; Mozambique Channel; Surface circulation; Surface drifters
Résumé The pattern of surface circulation in the Mozambique Channel was elucidated from the trajectories of 82 satellite-tracked drifters over the period 2000-2010 and complementary satellite-derived altimetry. Overall, the trajectories indicated that anticyclonic activity was mostly observed on the western side of the Channel, with cyclonic activity being more prevalent in the east. A lack of eddy activity was noted in the southeast corner of the Channel (i.e. SW of Madagascar). Drifter behaviour illustrated that surface water from the Comoros Basin, entrained into anticyclonic eddies during formation, can be retained and isolated for months whilst being transported southwards through the Channel. During a tropical cyclone weather event, a drifter was observed to switch between counter-rotating eddies indicating that horizontal mixing of the Ekman layer does occur. The drifters also illustrated and emphasised the flow field and transport between eddies (i.e. the interstitial flow) in the Mozambique Channel. Despite the dominance of southward propagating anticyclones, drifters were able to move north and south through the Channel in the frontal flow field between eddies within periods of 51-207 days. Cross-channel transport in both directions between the Madagascan and Mozambique shelf regions was similarly observed, with time spans of 19-30 days. Surprisingly, drifters from the southern limb of the East Madagascar Current were transported westward across the channel to the Mozambique shelf. This transport was similarly facilitated by the frontal flow field between eddies. It is hypothesised that the frontal zones between eddies and interstitial waters play an important role in distributing biota in the Mozambique Channel.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 361
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Auteur Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M.
Titre Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211
Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean
Résumé The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement