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Auteur D'agata, S.; Mouillot, D.; Wantiez, L.; Friedlander, A.M.; Kulbicki, M.; Vigliola, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Marine reserves lag behind wilderness in the conservation of key functional roles Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 7 Numéro (up) Pages 12000  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; coral-reef fishes; diversity indexes; ecosystem; new-caledonia; population-density; protected areas; species richness; visual-census; vulnerability  
  Résumé Although marine reserves represent one of the most effective management responses to human impacts, their capacity to sustain the same diversity of species, functional roles and biomass of reef fishes as wilderness areas remains questionable, in particular in regions with deep and long-lasting human footprints. Here we show that fish functional diversity and biomass of top predators are significantly higher on coral reefs located at more than 20 h travel time from the main market compared with even the oldest (38 years old), largest (17,500 ha) and most restrictive (no entry) marine reserve in New Caledonia (South-Western Pacific). We further demonstrate that wilderness areas support unique ecological values with no equivalency as one gets closer to humans, even in large and well-managed marine reserves. Wilderness areas may therefore serve as benchmarks for management effectiveness and act as the last refuges for the most vulnerable functional roles.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1625  
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Auteur Chiarello, M.; Auguet, J.-C.; Bettarel, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Claverie, T.; Graham, N.A.J.; Rieuvilleneuve, F.; Sucre, E.; Bouvier, T.; Villeger, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Skin microbiome of coral reef fish is highly variable and driven by host phylogeny and diet Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Microbiome  
  Volume 6 Numéro (up) Pages 147  
  Mots-Clés bacterial communities; divergence; diversity; evolution; insights; life-history; Microbiota; mucus; patterns; Phylogenetic diversity; Phylogenetic signal; Phylosymbiosis; sequence data; Teleost; Tropical; vulnerability  
  Résumé Background: The surface of marine animals is covered by abundant and diversified microbial communities, which have major roles for the health of their host While such microbiomes have been deeply examined in marine invertebrates such as corals and sponges, the microbiomes living on marine vertebrates have received less attention. Specifically, the diversity of these microbiomes, their variability among species, and their drivers are still mostly unknown, especially among the fish species living on coral reefs that contribute to key ecosystem services while they are increasingly affected by human activities. Here, we investigated these knowledge gaps analyzing the skin microbiome of 138 fish individuals belonging to 44 coral reef fish species living in the same area. Results: Prokaryotic communities living on the skin of coral reef fishes are highly diverse, with on average more than 600 OTUs per fish, and differ from planktonic microbes. Skin microbiomes varied between fish individual and species, and interspecific differences were slightly coupled to the phylogenetic affiliation of the host and its ecological traits. Conclusions: These results highlight that coral reef biodiversity is greater than previously appreciated, since the high diversity of macro-organisms supports a highly diversified microbial community. This suggest that beyond the loss of coral reefs-associated macroscopic species, anthropic activities on coral reefs could also lead to a loss of still unexplored host-associated microbial diversity, which urgently needs to be assessed.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2049-2618 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2421  
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Auteur Grenie, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Denelle, P.; Tucker, C.M.; Munoz, F.; Violle, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional rarity of coral reef fishes at the global scale: Hotspots and challenges for conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 226 Numéro (up) Pages 288-299  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Biodiversity facet; Coral triangle; diversity; ecology; ecosystem processes; Evolutionary distinctiveness; Functional distinctiveness; Funrar; marine-protected areas; ocean acidification; redundancy; species richness; trait; vulnerability  
  Résumé Characterizing functional diversity has become central in ecological research and for biodiversity assessment. Understanding the role of species with rare traits, i.e. functionally rare species, in community assembly, ecosystem dynamics and functioning has recently gained momentum. However, functional rarity is still ignored in conservation strategies. Here, we quantified global functional and evolutionary rarity for 2073 species of coral reef fishes and compared the rarity values to IUCN Red List status. Most species were functionally common but geographically rare. However, we found very weak correlation between functional rarity and evolutionary rarity. Functional rarity was highest for species classified as not evaluated or threatened by the IUCN Red List. The location of functional rarity hotspots (Tropical Eastern Pacific) did not match hotspots of species richness and evolutionary distinctiveness (Indo-Australian Archipelago), nor the currently protected areas. We argue that functional rarity should be acknowledged for both species and site prioritization in conservation strategies.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2434  
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Auteur Goetze, J.; Langlois, T.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Jupiter, S.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Periodically harvested closures require full protection of vulnerable species and longer closure periods Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 203 Numéro (up) Pages 67-74  
  Mots-Clés areas; biomass; Fiji; Fisheries management; life-history; Locally managed marine areas; Marine conservation; marine reserves; predatory fish; Recovery; reef fish communities; responses; small-scale fisheries; stereo-video; vulnerability  
  Résumé Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are small fisheries closures with objectives such as sustaining fisheries and conserving biodiversity and have become one of the most common forms of nearshore marine management in the Western Pacific. Although PHCs can provide both short-term conservation and fisheries benefits, their potential as a long-term management strategy remains unclear. Through empirical assessment of a single harvest event in each of five PHCs, we determined whether targeted fishes that differ in their vulnerability to fishing recovered to pre-harvest conditions (the state prior to last harvest) and demonstrated post-harvest recovery benefits after 1 year of re-closure. For low and moderately vulnerable species, two PHCs provided significant pre-harvest benefits and one provided significant post-harvest recovery benefits, suggesting a contribution to longer-term sustainability. PHCs with a combination of high compliance and longer closing times are more likely to provide fisheries benefits and recover from harvest events, however, no benefits were observed across any PHCs for highly vulnerable species. We recommend PHCs have longer closure periods before being harvested and species that are highly vulnerable to fishing (e.g. large species of; grouper, wrasse and parrotfish) are avoided during harvests to avoid overexploitation and increase the sustainability of small-scale fisheries. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1695  
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Auteur Olivier, D.; Loiseau, N.; Petatan-Ramirez, D.; Trujillo Milian, O.; Suarez-Castillo, A.N.; Torre, J.; Munguia-Vega, A.; Reyes-Bonilla, H. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional-biogeography of the reef fishes of the islands of the Gulf of California: Integrating functional divergence into marine conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Conserv.  
  Volume 16 Numéro (up) Pages e00506  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; communities; diversity; species richness; Biodiversity; vulnerability; framework; ecosystem function; redundancy; Functional traits; Biologically important area; Marine protected area; regionalization; rocky reefs; Sea of Cortez; Tropical Eastern Pacific  
  Résumé The Gulf of California (GC) is a semi-closed sea in the Tropical Eastern Pacific and is recognised as a highly diverse marine ecosystem. Despite this status, this region is still poorly studied in comparison to other marine hotspots. To start filling this gap, we attempt to provide a global overview of reef-fish diversity around the numerous islands of the region. We evaluated species richness, the abundance and biomass, and the functional diversity of the fish assemblages for the major islands of the GC. We first highlight that the southwestern part of the central GC is the hotspot of reef-fishes diversity within the GC, in terms of species richness, functional diversity, and fish abundance. We then found out an important functional divergence between fish assemblages of northern and southern regions. The fish biomass of each region is dominated by different species, characterised by different ecological traits (the opposite of functional convergence). This functional divergence may be explained by an important oceanographic heterogeneity along the latitudinal axis of the GC. The northern part shows larger climate fluctuations while the southern part is more tropical and climatically stable. Such functional divergence is a biodiversity facet to take into account when determining the sites to focus conservation action. In the GC, this criterion allows the importance of some sites to be highlighted to preserve the legacy of the reef-fishes, despite their lower diversity levels. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2481  
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