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Auteur Grenie, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Denelle, P.; Tucker, C.M.; Munoz, F.; Violle, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional rarity of coral reef fishes at the global scale: Hotspots and challenges for conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 226 Numéro Pages 288-299  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Biodiversity facet; Coral triangle; diversity; ecology; ecosystem processes; Evolutionary distinctiveness; Functional distinctiveness; Funrar; marine-protected areas; ocean acidification; redundancy; species richness; trait; vulnerability  
  Résumé Characterizing functional diversity has become central in ecological research and for biodiversity assessment. Understanding the role of species with rare traits, i.e. functionally rare species, in community assembly, ecosystem dynamics and functioning has recently gained momentum. However, functional rarity is still ignored in conservation strategies. Here, we quantified global functional and evolutionary rarity for 2073 species of coral reef fishes and compared the rarity values to IUCN Red List status. Most species were functionally common but geographically rare. However, we found very weak correlation between functional rarity and evolutionary rarity. Functional rarity was highest for species classified as not evaluated or threatened by the IUCN Red List. The location of functional rarity hotspots (Tropical Eastern Pacific) did not match hotspots of species richness and evolutionary distinctiveness (Indo-Australian Archipelago), nor the currently protected areas. We argue that functional rarity should be acknowledged for both species and site prioritization in conservation strategies.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2434  
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Auteur Goetze, J.; Langlois, T.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Jupiter, S.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Periodically harvested closures require full protection of vulnerable species and longer closure periods Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 203 Numéro Pages 67-74  
  Mots-Clés areas; biomass; Fiji; Fisheries management; life-history; Locally managed marine areas; Marine conservation; marine reserves; predatory fish; Recovery; reef fish communities; responses; small-scale fisheries; stereo-video; vulnerability  
  Résumé Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are small fisheries closures with objectives such as sustaining fisheries and conserving biodiversity and have become one of the most common forms of nearshore marine management in the Western Pacific. Although PHCs can provide both short-term conservation and fisheries benefits, their potential as a long-term management strategy remains unclear. Through empirical assessment of a single harvest event in each of five PHCs, we determined whether targeted fishes that differ in their vulnerability to fishing recovered to pre-harvest conditions (the state prior to last harvest) and demonstrated post-harvest recovery benefits after 1 year of re-closure. For low and moderately vulnerable species, two PHCs provided significant pre-harvest benefits and one provided significant post-harvest recovery benefits, suggesting a contribution to longer-term sustainability. PHCs with a combination of high compliance and longer closing times are more likely to provide fisheries benefits and recover from harvest events, however, no benefits were observed across any PHCs for highly vulnerable species. We recommend PHCs have longer closure periods before being harvested and species that are highly vulnerable to fishing (e.g. large species of; grouper, wrasse and parrotfish) are avoided during harvests to avoid overexploitation and increase the sustainability of small-scale fisheries. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1695  
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Auteur Giakoumi, S.; Halpern, B.S.; Michel, L.N.; Gobert, S.; Sini, M.; Boudouresque, C.-F.; Gambi, M.-C.; Katsanevakis, S.; Lejeune, P.; Montefalcone, M.; Pergent, G.; Pergent-Martini, C.; Sanchez-Jerez, P.; Velimirov, B.; Vizzini, S.; Abadie, A.; Coll, M.; Guidetti, P.; Micheli, F.; Possingham, H.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Towards a framework for assessment and management of cumulative human impacts on marine food webs Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Conservation Biology  
  Volume 29 Numéro 4 Pages 1228-1234  
  Mots-Clés acciones de conservación; amenazas múltiples; conservation actions; ecosystem-based management; expert knowledge elicitation; manejo con base en los ecosistemas; multiple threats; obtención de conocimiento de expertos; pastos marinos; seagrass; vulnerabilidad; vulnerability  
  Résumé Effective ecosystem-based management requires understanding ecosystem responses to multiple human threats, rather than focusing on single threats. To understand ecosystem responses to anthropogenic threats holistically, it is necessary to know how threats affect different components within ecosystems and ultimately alter ecosystem functioning. We used a case study of a Mediterranean seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) food web and expert knowledge elicitation in an application of the initial steps of a framework for assessment of cumulative human impacts on food webs. We produced a conceptual seagrass food web model, determined the main trophic relationships, identified the main threats to the food web components, and assessed the components’ vulnerability to those threats. Some threats had high (e.g., coastal infrastructure) or low impacts (e.g., agricultural runoff) on all food web components, whereas others (e.g., introduced carnivores) had very different impacts on each component. Partitioning the ecosystem into its components enabled us to identify threats previously overlooked and to reevaluate the importance of threats commonly perceived as major. By incorporating this understanding of system vulnerability with data on changes in the state of each threat (e.g., decreasing domestic pollution and increasing fishing) into a food web model, managers may be better able to estimate and predict cumulative human impacts on ecosystems and to prioritize conservation actions.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1523-1739 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1330  
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Auteur Darling, E.S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.A.; Nash, K.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Wilson, S.K. doi  openurl
  Titre Relationships between structural complexity, coral traits, and reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Coral Reefs  
  Volume 36 Numéro 2 Pages 561-575  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community; coral reef fish; diversity; ecosystems; fisheries; functional ecology; Habitat complexity; Habitat diversity; life; marine reserves; ocean acidification; Reef architecture; scleractinian corals; species traits; vulnerability  
  Résumé With the ongoing loss of coral cover and the associated flattening of reef architecture, understanding the links between coral habitat and reef fishes is of critical importance. Here, we investigate whether considering coral traits and functional diversity provides new insights into the relationship between structural complexity and reef fish communities, and whether coral traits and community composition can predict structural complexity. Across 157 sites in Seychelles, Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and Australia's Great Barrier Reef, we find that structural complexity and reef zone are the strongest and most consistent predictors of reef fish abundance, biomass, species richness, and trophic structure. However, coral traits, diversity, and life histories provided additional predictive power for models of reef fish assemblages, and were key drivers of structural complexity. Our findings highlight that reef complexity relies on living corals-with different traits and life histories-continuing to build carbonate skeletons, and that these nuanced relationships between coral assemblages and habitat complexity can affect the structure of reef fish assemblages. Seascape-level estimates of structural complexity are rapid and cost effective with important implications for the structure and function of fish assemblages, and should be incorporated into monitoring programs.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2150  
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Auteur Leclerc, C.; Villeger, S.; Marino, C.; Bellard, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Global changes threaten functional and taxonomic diversity of insular species worldwide Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Divers. Distrib.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 4 Pages 402-414  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; birds; conservation; dimensions; extinction risk; functional specialization; functional originality; functional richness; islands; mammals; redundancy; species traits; trait; vulnerability  
  Résumé Aim The assessment of biodiversity patterns under global changes is currently biased towards taxonomic diversity, thus overlooking the ecological and functional aspects of species. Here, we characterized both taxonomic and functional diversity of insular biodiversity threatened by multiple threats. Location Worldwide islands (n = 4,348). Methods We analysed the relative importance of eleven major threats, including biological invasions or climate change, on 2,756 insular endemic mammals and birds. Species were functionally described using five ecological traits related to diet, habitat and body mass. We computed complementary taxonomic and functional diversity indices (richness, specialization, originality and vulnerability) of species pools affected by each threatening process to investigate relationships between diversity dimensions and threats. We also determined whether species-specific traits are associated with specific threats. Results On average, 8% of insular endemic species at risk of extinction are impacted by threats, while 20% of their functional richness is affected. However, a marked disparity in functional richness values associated with each threat can be highlighted. In particular, cultivation and wildlife exploitation are the greatest threats to insular endemic species. Moreover, each threat may contribute to the loss of at least 10% of functional diversity, because it affects threatened species that support unique and extreme functions. Finally, we found complex patterns of species-specific traits associated with particular threats that is not explain by the threatening processes (directly affecting survival or modifying habitat). For instance, cultivation threatens very large mammals, while urbanization threatens very small mammals. Main conclusions These findings reinforce the importance of exploring the vulnerability of biodiversity facets in the face of multiple threats. Anthropogenic pressures may result in a loss of unique functions within insular ecosystems, which provides important insights into the understanding of threatening processes at a global scale.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000511022100001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2738  
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