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Auteur Anderson, P.S.L.; Claverie, T.; Patek, S.N.
Titre Levers And Linkages: Mechanical Trade-Offs In A Power-Amplified System Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolution
Volume 68 Numéro 7 Pages 1919-1933
Mots-Clés amplification; Biomechanics; comparative methods; evolution; kinematic transmission; labrid fishes; mantis shrimp; modularity; morphology; phylogenetic; stomatopods; strike; trade-offs
Résumé Mechanical redundancy within a biomechanical system (e. g., many-to-one mapping) allows morphologically divergent organisms to maintain equivalent mechanical outputs. However, most organisms depend on the integration of more than one biomechanical system. Here, we test whether coupled mechanical systems follow a pattern of amplification (mechanical changes are congruent and evolve toward the same functional extreme) or independence (mechanisms evolve independently). We examined the correlated evolution and evolutionary pathways of the coupled four-bar linkage and lever systems in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) ultrafast raptorial appendages. We examined models of character evolution in the framework of two divergent groups of stomatopods-“smashers” (hammer-shaped appendages) and “spearers” (bladed appendages). Smashers tended to evolve toward force amplification, whereas spearers evolved toward displacement amplification. These findings show that coupled biomechanical systems can evolve synergistically, thereby resulting in functional amplification rather than mechanical redundancy.
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ISSN 0014-3820 ISBN Médium
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Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AL3TK<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 40<br/>Anderson, Philip S. L. Claverie, Thomas Patek, S. N.<br/>National Science Foundation [IOS-1149748]<br/>The authors would like to thank S. Price for extensive assistance on phylogenetic comparative methods and L. Revell for help and advice for using his Phytools package for R. We would also like to thank M. Porter, M. Rosario, P. Green, S. Cox, and K. Kagaya for helpful discussions on stomatopod biology as well as two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments, which have greatly improved the quality of this article. We also thank K. Reed (National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC) and S. Keable (Australian Museum of Natural History, Sydney) for access to their specimen collections. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (IOS-1149748) to SNP. The authors declare no conflict of interest.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1156
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Auteur Barboza, P.S.; Bennett, A.; Lignot, J.H.; Mackie, R.I.; McWhorter, T.J.; Secor, S.M.; Skovgaard, N.; Sundset, M.A.; Wang, T.
Titre Digestive Challenges for Vertebrate Animals: Microbial Diversity, Cardiorespiratory Coupling, and Dietary Specialization Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Physiol. Biochem. Zool.
Volume 83 Numéro 5 Pages 764-774
Mots-Clés blood-flow; burmese; condensed tannins; garter snake; gastrointestinal; muskoxen ovibos-moschatus; postprandial metabolic-response; python; python python-molurus; snake boa-constrictor; thamnophis-elegans; trade-offs
Résumé The digestive system is the interface between the supply of food for an animal and the demand for energy and nutrients to maintain the body, to grow, and to reproduce. Digestive systems are not morphologically static but rather dynamically respond to changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the diet and the level of food intake. In this article, we discuss three themes that affect the ability of an animal to alter digestive function in relation to novel substrates and changing food supply: (1) the fermentative digestion in herbivores, (2) the integration of cardiopulmonary and digestive functions, and (3) the evolution of dietary specialization. Herbivores consume, digest, and detoxify complex diets by using a wide variety of enzymes expressed by bacteria, predominantly in the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Carnivores, such as snakes that feed intermittently, sometimes process very large meals that require compensatory adjustments in blood flow, acid secretion, and regulation of acid-base homeostasis. Snakes and birds that specialize in simple diets of prey or nectar retain their ability to digest a wider selection of prey. The digestive system continues to be of interest to comparative physiologists because of its plasticity, both phenotypic and evolutionary, and because of its widespread integration with other physiological systems, including thermoregulation, circulation, ventilation, homeostasis, immunity, and reproduction.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1522-2152 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 542
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Auteur Calcagno, V.; Jarne, P.; Loreau, M.; Mouquet, N.; David, P.
Titre Diversity spurs diversification in ecological communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 8 Numéro Pages 15810
Mots-Clés adaptive radiations; biodiversity; colonization; competition; drive speciation; evolutionary emergence; limiting similarity; stability; sympatric speciation; trade-off
Résumé Diversity is a fundamental, yet threatened, property of ecological systems. The idea that diversity can itself favour diversification, in an autocatalytic process, is very appealing but remains controversial. Here, we study a generalized model of ecological communities and investigate how the level of initial diversity influences the possibility of evolutionary diversification. We show that even simple models of intra- and inter-specific ecological interactions can predict a positive effect of diversity on diversification: adaptive radiations may require a threshold number of species before kicking-off. We call this phenomenon DDAR (diversity-dependent adaptive radiations) and identify mathematically two distinct pathways connecting diversity to diversification, involving character displacement and the positive diversity-productivity relationship. Our results may explain observed delays in adaptive radiations at the macroscale and diversification patterns reported in experimental microbial communities, and shed new light on the dynamics of ecological diversity, the diversity-dependence of diversification rates, and the consequences of biodiversity loss.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2148
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Auteur Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 217 Numéro 6 Pages 859-865
Mots-Clés Compensatory growth; Ecophysiology; Food deprivation; Foraging; Locomotion; atlantic; catch-up growth; cod; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecological performance; gadus-morhua; long-term starvation; metabolic responses; salmon; teleost fish; trade-off; trade-offs; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food deprivation.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 601
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Auteur Massol, F.; Altermatt, F.; Gounand, I.; Gravel, D.; Leibold, M.A.; Mouquet, N.
Titre How life-history traits affect ecosystem properties: effects of dispersal in meta-ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Oikos
Volume 126 Numéro 4 Pages 532-546
Mots-Clés colonization trade-off; ecological stoichiometry; interaction strengths; neutral metacommunities; pond metacommunities; predator-prey interactions; source-sink metacommunities; species-diversity; terrestrial food webs; theoretical framework
Résumé The concept of life-history traits and the study of these traits are the hallmark of population biology. Acknowledging their variability and evolution has allowed us to understand how species adapt in response to their environment. The same traits are also involved in how species alter ecosystems and shape their dynamics and functioning. Some theories, such as the metabolic theory of ecology, ecological stoichiometry or pace-of-life theory, already recognize this junction, but only do so in an implicitly non-spatial context. Meanwhile, for a decade now, it has been argued that ecosystem properties have to be understood at a larger scale using meta-ecosystem theory because source-sink dynamics, community assembly and ecosystem stability are all modified by spatial structure. Here, we argue that some ecosystem properties can be linked to a single life-history trait, dispersal, i.e. the tendency of organisms to live, compete and reproduce away from their birth place. By articulating recent theoretical and empirical studies linking ecosystem functioning and dynamics to species dispersal, we aim to highlight both the known connections between life-history traits and ecosystem properties and the unknown areas, which deserve further empirical and theoretical developments.
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ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2120
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