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Auteur Ben Lamine, Y.; Pringault, O.; Aissi, M.; Ensibi, C.; Mahmoudi, E.; Daly Yahia Kefi, O.; Daly Yahia, M.N.
Titre Environmental controlling factors of copepod communities in the Gulf of Tunis (south western Mediterranean Sea) Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Cahiers de Biologie Marine
Volume 56 Numéro 3 Pages 213-229
Mots-Clés Competition; Copepod diversity; multivariate analysis; Salinity; Temperature; Top-down control
Résumé The copepod community structure and the distribution of the main groups of zooplankton were studied along an inshore-offshore gradient in the Gulf of Tunis during the rainy and dry seasons of 2007-2008. Hydrological parameters were also measured to assess the potential role of abiotic and biotic factors in the distribution of copepod species. The copepod community in the Gulf of Tunis comprises 86 species dominated by Paracalanus parvus, Clausocalanus lividus, Centropages kroyeri and Acartia clausi. Time had a greater influence than space (horizontal and vertical gradients) in shaping the copepod community structure with a significant influence of the seasons; winter (cold and rainy) resulted in hydrological conditions that were strongly different from those observed in summer (warm and dry). These hydrological differences were concomitant with changes in the community structure, with a high copepod diversity observed in winter while the summer period was characterized by a low specific richness and the dominance of a few species, Centropages kroyeri and Paracalanus parvus along the inshore-offshore gradient and Paracalanus aculeatus along the vertical. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that temperature, salinity and to a lesser extent chlorophyll a were the most important environmental factors structuring the copepod community. Interestingly, temperature and salinity showed a negative significant correlation with copepod specific richness. Competition with grazers (cladoceran) as well as top down control by predators (chaetognaths and siphonophors) were also identified as key factors for the copepod community structure.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0007-9723 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000358550200003 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1324
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Auteur Chevrinais, M.; Jacquet, C.; Cloutier, R.
Titre Early establishment of vertebrate trophic interactions: Food web structure in Middle to Late Devonian fish assemblages with exceptional fossilization Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Bull. Geosci.
Volume 92 Numéro 4 Pages 491-510
Mots-Clés north-america; bottom-up; body-size; predator; top-down; bottom-up control; coordinated stasis; Devonian; digestive contents; ecomorphology; escuminac formation; foraging ecology; fossil fish; fossil record; pahteoecology; prey size relationships; top-down control
Résumé In past and present ecosystems, trophic interactions determine material and energy transfers among species, regulating population dynamics and community stability. Food web studies in past ecosystems are helpful to assess the persistence of ecosystem structure throughout geological times and to explore the existence of general principles of food web assembly. We determined and compared the trophic structure of two Devonian fish assemblages [(1) the Escuminac assemblage (ca. 380 Ma), Miguasha, eastern Canada and (2) the Lode assemblage (ca. 390 Ma), Straupe, Latvia] with a closer look at the Escuminac assemblage. Both localities are representative of Middle to Late Devonian aquatic vertebrate assemblages in terms of taxonomic richness (ca. 20 species), phylogenetic diversity (all major groups of lower vertebrates) and palaeoenvironment (palaeoestuaries). Fossil food web structures were assessed using different kinds of direct (i.e. digestive contents and bite marks in fossils) and indirect (e.g. ecomoiphological measurements, stratigraphic species co-occurrences) indicators. First, the relationships between predator and prey body size established for the Escuminac fishes are comparable to those of recent aquatic ecosystems, highlighting a consistency of aquatic food web structure across geological time. Second, non-metric dimensional scaling on ecomorphological variables and cluster analysis showed a common pattern of functional groups for both fish assemblages; top predators, predators, primary and secondary consumers were identified. We conclude that Devonian communities were organized in multiple trophic levels and that size-based feeding interactions were established early in vertebrate history.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1214-1119 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2251
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Auteur Reynolds, P.L.; Stachowicz, J.J.; Hovel, K.; Bostrom, C.; Boyer, K.; Cusson, M.; Eklof, J.S.; Engel, F.G.; Engelen, A.H.; Eriksson, B.K.; Fodrie, F.J.; Griffin, J.N.; Hereu, C.M.; Hori, M.; Hanley, T.C.; Ivanov, M.; Jorgensen, P.; Kruschel, C.; Lee, K.-S.; McGlathery, K.; Moksnes, P.-O.; Nakaoka, M.; O'Connor, M.I.; O'Connor, N.E.; Orth, R.J.; Rossi, F.; Ruesink, J.; Sotka, E.E.; Thormar, J.; Tomas, F.; Unsworth, R.K.F.; Whalen, M.A.; Duffy, J.E.
Titre Latitude, temperature, and habitat complexity predict predation pressure in eelgrass beds across the Northern Hemisphere Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology
Volume 99 Numéro 1 Pages 29-35
Mots-Clés patterns; communities; diversity; ecosystems; temperature; seagrasses; eutrophication; predation; biogeography; prey; top-down control; enrichment; latitude; mesograzer; seagrass; species interactions; water temperature; Zostera
Résumé Latitudinal gradients in species interactions are widely cited as potential causes or consequences of global patterns of biodiversity. However, mechanistic studies documenting changes in interactions across broad geographic ranges are limited. We surveyed predation intensity on common prey (live amphipods and gastropods) in communities of eelgrass (Zostera marina) at 48 sites across its Northern Hemisphere range, encompassing over 37 degrees of latitude and four continental coastlines. Predation on amphipods declined with latitude on all coasts but declined more strongly along western ocean margins where temperature gradients are steeper. Whereas insitu water temperature at the time of the experiments was uncorrelated with predation, mean annual temperature strongly positively predicted predation, suggesting a more complex mechanism than simply increased metabolic activity at the time of predation. This large-scale biogeographic pattern was modified by local habitat characteristics; predation declined with higher shoot density both among and within sites. Predation rates on gastropods, by contrast, were uniformly low and varied little among sites. The high replication and geographic extent of our study not only provides additional evidence to support biogeographic variation in predation intensity, but also insight into the mechanisms that relate temperature and biogeographic gradients in species interactions.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2254
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