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Auteur (up) Boukef, I.; El Bour, M.; Al Gallas, N.; El Bahri, O.; Mejri, S.; Mraouna, R.; Ben Aissa, R.; Boudabous, A.; Got, P.; Troussellier, M.
Titre Survival of Escherichia coli Strains in Mediterranean Brackish Water in the Bizerte Lagoon in Northern Tunisia Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Water Environ Res
Volume 82 Numéro 11 Pages 2249-2257
Mots-Clés bizerte lagoon; brackish water; coastal waters; cytotoxicity; enteric bacteria; escherichia coli; fecal-coliforms; marine waters; salmonella-typhimurium; seawater microcosms; sewage; shigella-dysenteriae type-1; sunlight; survival; viability; virulence
Résumé This study investigated survival and virulence of Escherichia coli strains exposed to natural conditions in brackish water. Two E. coli strains (O126:B16 and O55:B5) were incubated in water microcosms in the Bizerte lagoon in Northern Tunisia and exposed for 12 days to natural sunlight in June (231 to 386 W/m(2), 26 +/- 1 degrees C, 30 g/L) and in April (227 to 330 W/m(2), 17 +/- 1 degrees C, 27 g/L) or maintained in darkness for 21 days (17 +/- 1 degrees C, 27 g/L). The results revealed that sunlight was the most significant inactivating factor (decrease of 3 Ulog within 48 hours for the two strains) compared to salinity and temperature (in darkness). Survival time of the strains was prolonged as they were maintained in darkness. Local strain (E. coli O55:B5) showed better survival capacity (T(90) = 52 hours) than E. coli O126:B16 (T(90) = 11 h). For both, modifications were noted only for some metabolic activities of carbohydrates hydrolysis. Cytotoxicity of the two strains, tested on Vero cell, was maintained during the period of survival. Water Environ. Res., 82, 2249 (2010).
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1061-4303 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 864
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Auteur (up) Capietto, A.; Escalle, L.; Chavance, P.; Dubroca, L.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Murua, H.; Floch, L.; Damiano, A.; Rowat, D.; Mérigot, B.
Titre Mortality of marine megafauna induced by fisheries: Insights from the whale shark, the world’s largest fish Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume 174 Numéro Pages 147-151
Mots-Clés Apparent survival; Bycatch; Hotspots of interaction; marine conservation; Megafauna; Rhincodon typus
Résumé The expansion of human activities is endangering megafauna in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. While large marine vertebrates are often vulnerable and emblematic species, many are considered to be declining, primarily due to fisheries activities. In the open ocean, certain fisheries improve their efficiency of detecting tuna schools by locating and fishing close to some macro-organisms, such as whale sharks or marine mammals. However, collecting accurate data on the accidental capture and mortality of these organisms is a complex process. We analyzed a large database of logbooks from 65 industrial vessels with and without scientific observers on board (487,272 and 16,096 fishing sets since 1980 and 1995 respectively) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Distribution maps of Sightings Per Unit of Effort highlights major hotspots of interactions between the fishery and whale sharks in the coastal area from Gabon to Angola in the Atlantic from April to September, and in the Mozambique Channel in the Indian Ocean between April and May. The incidence of apparent whale shark mortality due to fishery interaction is extremely low (two of the 145 whale sharks encircled by the net died, i.e. 1.38%). However, these two hotspots presented a relatively high rate of incidental whale shark capture. Thus, we underline the importance of estimating long-term post-release mortality rates by tracking individuals and/or by photographic identification to define precise conservation management measures.
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ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 347
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Auteur (up) Chong-Robles, J.; Charmantier, G.; Boulo, V.; Lizárraga-Valdéz, J.; Enríquez-Paredes, L.M.; Giffard-Mena, I.
Titre Osmoregulation pattern and salinity tolerance of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) during post-embryonic development Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture
Volume 422–423 Numéro Pages 261-267
Mots-Clés Crustacean; Hypo–hyper osmoregulation; Larvae; Osmotic pressure; Osmotic stress; survival
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ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 756
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Auteur (up) Cox, S.L.; Authier, M.; Orgeret, F.; Weimerskirch, H.; Guinet, C.
Titre High mortality rates in a juvenile free-ranging marine predator and links to dive and forage ability Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.
Volume 10 Numéro 1 Pages 410-430
Mots-Clés antarctic fur seals; behavior; bio-logging; body condition; early life; foraging ecology; juvenile mortality; Mirounga leonina; mirounga-leonina; population; regularization paths; southern elephant seal; southern elephant seals; survival; survival analyses; variable selection; weaning mass
Résumé High juvenile mortality rates are typical of many long-lived marine vertebrate predators. Insufficient development in dive and forage ability is considered a key driver of this. However, direct links to survival outcome are sparse, particularly in free-ranging marine animals that may not return to land. In this study, we conduct exploratory investigations toward early mortality in juvenile southern elephant seals Mirounga leonina. Twenty postweaning pups were equipped with (a) a new-generation satellite relay data tag, capable of remotely transmitting fine-scale behavioral movements from accelerometers, and (b) a location transmitting only tag (so that mortality events could be distinguished from device failures). Individuals were followed during their first trip at sea (until mortality or return to land). Two analyses were conducted. First, the behavioral movements and encountered environmental conditions of nonsurviving pups were individually compared to temporally concurrent observations from grouped survivors. Second, common causes of mortality were investigated using Cox's proportional hazard regression and penalized shrinkage techniques. Nine individuals died (two females and seven males) and 11 survived (eight females and three males). All but one individual died before the return phase of their first trip at sea, and all but one were negatively buoyant. Causes of death were variable, although common factors included increased horizontal travel speeds and distances, decreased development in dive and forage ability, and habitat type visited (lower sea surface temperatures and decreased total [eddy] kinetic energy). For long-lived marine vertebrate predators, such as the southern elephant seal, the first few months of life following independence represent a critical period, when small deviations in behavior from the norm appear sufficient to increase mortality risk. Survival rates may subsequently be particularly vulnerable to changes in climate and environment, which will have concomitant consequences on the demography and dynamics of populations.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000502011200001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2698
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Auteur (up) Ellis, J.R.; McCully Phillips, S. R.; Poisson, F.
Titre A review of capture and post-release mortality of elasmobranchs Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.
Volume 90 Numéro 3 Pages 653-722
Mots-Clés algarve southern portugal; batoids; By-catch; bycatch reduction devices; california recreational fishery; discards; dogfish; dogfish squalus-acanthias; gulf-of-mexico; pelagic longline fishery; physiological stress-response; shark prionace-glauca; sharks; shrimp trawl fishery; survival; turtle excluder devices
Résumé There is a need to better understand the survivorship of discarded fishes, both for commercial stocks and species of conservation concern. Within European waters, the landing obligations that are currently being phased in as part of the European Union's reformed common fisheries policy means that an increasing number of fish stocks, with certain exceptions, should not be discarded unless it can be demonstrated that there is a high probability of survival. This study reviews the various approaches that have been used to examine the discard survival of elasmobranchs, both in terms of at-vessel mortality (AVM) and post-release mortality (PRM), with relevant findings summarized for both the main types of fishing gear used and by taxonomic group. Discard survival varies with a range of biological attributes (species, size, sex and mode of gill ventilation) as well as the range of factors associated with capture (e.g. gear type, soak time, catch mass and composition, handling practices and the degree of exposure to air and any associated change in ambient temperature). In general, demersal species with buccal-pump ventilation have a higher survival than obligate ram ventilators. Several studies have indicated that females may have a higher survival than males. Certain taxa (including hammerhead sharks Sphyrna spp. and thresher sharks Alopias spp.) may be particularly prone to higher rates of mortality when caught. (C) 2016 Crown copyright
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2106
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