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Auteur (up) Abgrall, C.; Chauvat, M.; Langlois, E.; Hedde, M.; Mouillot, D.; Salmon, S.; Winck, B.; Forey, E.
Titre Shifts and linkages of functional diversity between above- and below-ground compartments along a flooding gradient Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Funct. Ecol.
Volume 31 Numéro 2 Pages 350-360
Mots-Clés biodiversity; community assembly; community ecology; disturbance; divergence; environmental gradient; feeding guilds; functional traits; microarthropod communities; null models; patterns; plant; plant communities; soil collembola; soil-plant interactions; species traits; trait convergence and trait divergence
Résumé 1. Trait-based approaches have the potential to reveal general and predictive relationships between organisms and ecosystem functioning. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional structure of communities are still unclear. Within terrestrial ecosystems, several studies have shown that many ecological processes are controlled by the interacting above-and belowground compartments. However, few studies have used traits to reveal the functional relationships between plants and soil fauna. Mostly, research combining plants and soil fauna solely used the traits of one assemblage in predictive studies. 2. Above-ground (plants) and below-ground (Collembola) compartments were sampled over a flooding gradient in northern France along the Seine River. First, we measured the effect of flooding on functional and taxonomic assembly within both communities. We then considered the linkages between plant and Collembolan species richness, community traits and assessed whether traits of both compartments converged at high flooding intensity (abiotic filtering) and diverged when this constraint is released (biotic filtering). 3. Species richness of both taxa followed the same bell-shaped pattern along the gradient, while a similar significant pattern of functional richness was only observed for plants. Further analyses revealed a progressive shift from trait convergence to divergence for plants, but not for Collembola, as constraints intensity decreased. Instead, our results highlighted that Collembola traits were mainly linked to the variations in plant traits. This leads, within Collembola assemblages, to convergence of a subset of perception and habitat-related traits for which the relationship with plant traits was assessed. 4. Synthesis. Using a trait-based approach, our study highlighted that functional relationships occur between above-and below-ground compartments. We underlined that functional composition of plant communities plays a key role in structuring Collembola assemblages in addition to the role of abiotic variables. Our study clearly shows that functional diversity provides a new approach to link the above-and below-ground compartments and might, therefore, be further considered when studying ecological processes at the interface between both compartments.
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ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2091
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Auteur (up) Aubree, F.; David, P.; Jarne, P.; Loreau, M.; Mouquet, N.; Calcagno, V.
Titre How community adaptation affects biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.
Volume 23 Numéro 8 Pages 1263-1275
Mots-Clés stability; competition; species richness; species interactions; diversity; selection; consequences; species traits; evolution; productivity; food webs; Adaptive dynamics; eco-evolutionary dynamics; invasion; niche differentiation
Résumé Evidence is growing that evolutionary dynamics can impact biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relationships. However the nature of such impacts remains poorly understood. Here we use a modelling approach to compare random communities, with no trait evolutionary fine-tuning, and co-adapted communities, where traits have co-evolved, in terms of emerging biodiversity-productivity, biodiversity-stability and biodiversity-invasion relationships. Community adaptation impacted most BEF relationships, sometimes inverting the slope of the relationship compared to random communities. Biodiversity-productivity relationships were generally less positive among co-adapted communities, with reduced contribution of sampling effects. The effect of community-adaptation, though modest regarding invasion resistance, was striking regarding invasion tolerance: co-adapted communities could remain very tolerant to invasions even at high diversity. BEF relationships are thus contingent on the history of ecosystems and their degree of community adaptation. Short-term experiments and observations following recent changes may not be safely extrapolated into the future, once eco-evolutionary feedbacks have taken place.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2906
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Auteur (up) Chao, A.; Chiu, C.-H.; Villeger, S.; Sun, I.-F.; Thorn, S.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chiang, J.-M.; Sherwin, W.B.
Titre An attribute-diversity approach to functional diversity, functional beta diversity, and related (dis)similarity measures Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Monogr.
Volume 89 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-e01343
Mots-Clés attribute diversity; biodiversity; biological diversity; consensus; conservation; differentiation measures; diversity decomposition; evenness; framework; functional (dis)similarity; functional beta diversity; functional diversity; Hill numbers; phylogenetic diversity; quadratic entropy; similarity; species diversity; species richness; species traits; trait diversity
Résumé Based on the framework of attribute diversity (a generalization of Hill numbers of order q), we develop a class of functional diversity measures sensitive not only to species abundances but also to trait-based species-pairwise functional distances. The new method refines and improves on the conventional species-equivalent approach in three areas: (1) the conventional method often gives similar values (close to unity) to assemblages with contrasting levels of functional diversity; (2) when a distance metric is unbounded, the conventional functional diversity depends on the presence/absence of other assemblages in the study; (3) in partitioning functional gamma diversity into alpha and beta components, the conventional gamma is sometimes less than alpha. To resolve these issues, we add to the attribute-diversity framework a novel concept: tau, the threshold of functional distinctiveness between any two species; here, tau can be chosen to be any positive value. Any two species with functional distance >= tau are treated as functionally equally distinct. Our functional diversity quantifies the effective number of functionally equally distinct species (or “virtual functional groups”) with all pairwise distances at least tau for different species pairs. We advocate the use of two complementary diversity profiles (tau profile and q profile), which depict functional diversity with varying levels of tau and q, respectively. Both the conventional species-equivalent method (i.e., tau is the maximum of species-pairwise distances) and classic taxonomic diversity (i.e., tau is the minimum of non-zero species-pairwise distances) are incorporated into our proposed tau profile for an assemblage. For any type of species-pairwise distance matrices, our attribute-diversity approach allows proper diversity partitioning, with the desired property gamma >= alpha and thus avoids all the restrictions that apply to the conventional diversity decomposition. Our functional alpha and gamma are interpreted as the effective numbers of functionally equally distinct species, respectively, in an assemblage and in the pooled assemblage, while beta is the effective number of equally large assemblages with no shared species and all species in the assemblages being equally distinct. The resulting beta diversity can be transformed to obtain abundance-sensitive Sorensen- and Jaccard-type functional (dis)similarity profiles. Hypothetical and real examples are used to illustrate the framework. Online software and R codes are available to facilitate computations.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0012-9615 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000477640700001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2620
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Auteur (up) Darling, E.S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.A.; Nash, K.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Wilson, S.K.
Titre Relationships between structural complexity, coral traits, and reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs
Volume 36 Numéro 2 Pages 561-575
Mots-Clés biodiversity; community; coral reef fish; diversity; ecosystems; fisheries; functional ecology; Habitat complexity; Habitat diversity; life; marine reserves; ocean acidification; Reef architecture; scleractinian corals; species traits; vulnerability
Résumé With the ongoing loss of coral cover and the associated flattening of reef architecture, understanding the links between coral habitat and reef fishes is of critical importance. Here, we investigate whether considering coral traits and functional diversity provides new insights into the relationship between structural complexity and reef fish communities, and whether coral traits and community composition can predict structural complexity. Across 157 sites in Seychelles, Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and Australia's Great Barrier Reef, we find that structural complexity and reef zone are the strongest and most consistent predictors of reef fish abundance, biomass, species richness, and trophic structure. However, coral traits, diversity, and life histories provided additional predictive power for models of reef fish assemblages, and were key drivers of structural complexity. Our findings highlight that reef complexity relies on living corals-with different traits and life histories-continuing to build carbonate skeletons, and that these nuanced relationships between coral assemblages and habitat complexity can affect the structure of reef fish assemblages. Seascape-level estimates of structural complexity are rapid and cost effective with important implications for the structure and function of fish assemblages, and should be incorporated into monitoring programs.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2150
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Auteur (up) Leclerc, C.; Villeger, S.; Marino, C.; Bellard, C.
Titre Global changes threaten functional and taxonomic diversity of insular species worldwide Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Divers. Distrib.
Volume 26 Numéro 4 Pages 402-414
Mots-Clés biodiversity; birds; conservation; dimensions; extinction risk; functional specialization; functional originality; functional richness; islands; mammals; redundancy; species traits; trait; vulnerability
Résumé Aim The assessment of biodiversity patterns under global changes is currently biased towards taxonomic diversity, thus overlooking the ecological and functional aspects of species. Here, we characterized both taxonomic and functional diversity of insular biodiversity threatened by multiple threats. Location Worldwide islands (n = 4,348). Methods We analysed the relative importance of eleven major threats, including biological invasions or climate change, on 2,756 insular endemic mammals and birds. Species were functionally described using five ecological traits related to diet, habitat and body mass. We computed complementary taxonomic and functional diversity indices (richness, specialization, originality and vulnerability) of species pools affected by each threatening process to investigate relationships between diversity dimensions and threats. We also determined whether species-specific traits are associated with specific threats. Results On average, 8% of insular endemic species at risk of extinction are impacted by threats, while 20% of their functional richness is affected. However, a marked disparity in functional richness values associated with each threat can be highlighted. In particular, cultivation and wildlife exploitation are the greatest threats to insular endemic species. Moreover, each threat may contribute to the loss of at least 10% of functional diversity, because it affects threatened species that support unique and extreme functions. Finally, we found complex patterns of species-specific traits associated with particular threats that is not explain by the threatening processes (directly affecting survival or modifying habitat). For instance, cultivation threatens very large mammals, while urbanization threatens very small mammals. Main conclusions These findings reinforce the importance of exploring the vulnerability of biodiversity facets in the face of multiple threats. Anthropogenic pressures may result in a loss of unique functions within insular ecosystems, which provides important insights into the understanding of threatening processes at a global scale.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000511022100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2738
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