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Auteur Stephenson, F.; Goetz, K.; Sharp, B.R.; Mouton, T.L.; Beets, F.L.; Roberts, J.; MacDiarmid, A.B.; Constantine, R.; Lundquist, C.J.
Titre Modelling the spatial distribution of cetaceans in New Zealand waters Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Diversity and Distributions
Volume 26 Numéro 4 Pages 495-516
Mots-Clés boosted regression tree models; cetacean distribution; New Zealand; relative environmental suitability models; spatial management; species distribution models
Résumé Aim Cetaceans are inherently difficult to study due to their elusive, pelagic and often highly migratory nature. New Zealand waters are home to 50% of the world's cetacean species, but their spatial distributions are poorly known. Here, we model distributions of 30 cetacean taxa using an extensive at-sea sightings dataset (n > 14,000) and high-resolution (1 km2) environmental data layers. Location New Zealand's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Methods Two models were used to predict probability of species occurrence based on available sightings records. For taxa with <50 sightings (n = 15), Relative Environmental Suitability (RES), and for taxa with ≥50 sightings (n = 15), Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) models were used. Independently collected presence/absence data were used for further model evaluation for a subset of taxa. Results RES models for rarely sighted species showed reasonable fits to available sightings and stranding data based on literature and expert knowledge on the species' autecology. BRT models showed high predictive power for commonly sighted species (AUC: 0.79–0.99). Important variables for predicting the occurrence of cetacean taxa were temperature residuals, bathymetry, distance to the 500 m isobath, mixed layer depth and water turbidity. Cetacean distribution patterns varied from highly localised, nearshore (e.g., Hector's dolphin), to more ubiquitous (e.g., common dolphin) to primarily offshore species (e.g., blue whale). Cetacean richness based on stacked species occurrence layers illustrated patterns of fewer inshore taxa with localised richness hotspots, and higher offshore richness especially in locales of the Macquarie Ridge, Bounty Trough and Chatham Rise. Main conclusions Predicted spatial distributions fill a major knowledge gap towards informing future assessments and conservation planning for cetaceans in New Zealand's extensive EEZ. While sightings datasets were not spatially comprehensive for any taxa, these two best available approaches allow for predictive modelling of both more common, and of rarely sighted, cetacean species with limited available information.
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ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2692
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Auteur Authier, M.; Saraux, C.; Péron, C.
Titre Variable selection and accurate predictions in habitat modelling: a shrinkage approach Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Ecography
Volume 40 Numéro 4 Pages 549-560
Mots-Clés account; distributional data; Ecology; indian-ocean; inference; Mediterranean Sea; regression methods; small pelagic fish; spatial autocorrelation; species distribution models
Résumé Habitat modelling is increasingly relevant in biodiversity and conservation studies. A typical application is to predict potential zones of specific conservation interest. With many environmental covariates, a large number of models can he investigated but multi-model inference may become impractical. Shrinkage regression overcomes this issue by dealing with the identification and accurate estimation of effect size for prediction. In a Bayesian framework we investigated the use of a shrinkage prior, the Horseshoe, for variable selection in spatial generalized linear models (GLM). As study cases, we considered 5 datasets on small pelagic fish abundance in the Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea, France) and 9 environmental inputs. We compared the predictive performances of a simple kriging model, a full spatial GLM model with independent normal priors for regression coefficients, a full spatial GLM model with a Horseshoe prior for regression coefficients and 2 zero-inflated models (spatial and non-spatial) with a Horseshoe prior. Predictive performances were evaluated by cross validation on a hold-out subset of the data: models with a Horseshoe prior performed best, and the full model with independent normal priors worst. With an increasing number of inputs, extrapolation quickly became pervasive as we tried to predict from novel combinations of covariate values. By shrinking regression coefficients with a Horseshoe prior, only one model needed to be fitted to the data in order to obtain reasonable and accurate predictions, including extrapolations.
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ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2130
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Auteur Cazelles, K.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D.
Titre On the integration of biotic interaction and environmental constraints at the biogeographical scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Ecography
Volume 39 Numéro 10 Pages 921-931
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; cooccurrence; distributions; ecological communities; evolutionary; food webs; networks; niche; species distribution models
Résumé Biogeography is primarily concerned with the spatial distribution of biodiversity, including performing scenarios in a changing environment. The efforts deployed to develop species distribution models have resulted in predictive tools, but have mostly remained correlative and have largely ignored biotic interactions. Here we build upon the theory of island biogeography as a first approximation to the assembly dynamics of local communities embedded within a metacommunity context. We include all types of interactions and introduce environmental constraints on colonization and extinction dynamics. We develop a probabilistic framework based on Markov chains and derive probabilities for the realization of species assemblages, rather than single species occurrences. We consider the expected distribution of species richness under different types of ecological interactions. We also illustrate the potential of our framework by studying the interplay between different ecological requirements, interactions and the distribution of biodiversity along an environmental gradient. Our framework supports the idea that the future research in biogeography requires a coherent integration of several ecological concepts into a single theory in order to perform conceptual and methodological innovations, such as the switch from single-species distribution to community distribution.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1683
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Auteur Benedetti, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Adloff, F.; Ayata, S.-D.
Titre Investigating uncertainties in zooplankton composition shifts under climate change scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Ecography
Volume 41 Numéro 2 Pages 345-360
Mots-Clés marine biodiversity; species distribution models; north-atlantic; beta diversity; calanoid copepods; ecological-niche; envelope models; habitat-suitability; mass mortality; pseudo-absence data
Résumé Ensemble niche modelling has become a common framework to predict changes in assemblages composition under climate change scenarios. The amount of uncertainty generated by the different components of this framework has rarely been assessed. In the marine realm forecasts have usually focused on taxa representing the top of the marine food-web, thus overlooking their basal component: the plankton. Calibrating environmental niche models at the global scale, we modelled the habitat suitability of 106 copepod species and estimated the dissimilarity between present and future zooplanktonic assemblages in the surface Mediterranean Sea. We identified the patterns (species replacement versus nestedness) driving the predicted dissimilarity, and quantified the relative contributions of different uncertainty sources: environmental niche models, greenhouse gas emission scenarios, circulation model configurations and species prevalence. Our results confirm that the choice of the niche modelling method is the greatest source of uncertainty in habitat suitability projections. Presence-only and presence-absence methods provided different visions of the niches, which subsequently lead to different future scenarios of biodiversity changes. Nestedness with decline in species richness is the pattern driving dissimilarity between present and future copepod assemblages. Our projections contrast with those reported for higher trophic levels, suggesting that different components of the pelagic food-web may respond discordantly to future climatic changes.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2282
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Auteur Ottimofiore, E.; Albouy, C.; Leprieur, F.; Descombes, P.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Pellissier, L.
Titre Responses of coral reef fishes to past climate changes are related to life-history traits Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Ecol. Evol.
Volume 7 Numéro 6 Pages 1996-2005
Mots-Clés climate change; dispersal; diversity; environmental-change; future; global patterns; Indo-Pacific Ocean; range shifts; refugia; richness; sea-level; species distribution; species distribution models; temperature
Résumé Coral reefs and their associated fauna are largely impacted by ongoing climate change. Unravelling species responses to past climatic variations might provide clues on the consequence of ongoing changes. Here, we tested the relationship between changes in sea surface temperature and sea levels during the Quaternary and present-day distributions of coral reef fish species. We investigated whether species-specific responses are associated with life-history traits. We collected a database of coral reef fish distribution together with life-history traits for the Indo-Pacific Ocean. We ran species distribution models (SDMs) on 3,725 tropical reef fish species using contemporary environmental factors together with a variable describing isolation from stable coral reef areas during the Quaternary. We quantified the variance explained independently by isolation from stable areas in the SDMs and related it to a set of species traits including body size and mobility. The variance purely explained by isolation from stable coral reef areas on the distribution of extant coral reef fish species largely varied across species. We observed a triangular relationship between the contribution of isolation from stable areas in the SDMs and body size. Species, whose distribution is more associated with historical changes, occurred predominantly in the Indo-Australian archipelago, where the mean size of fish assemblages is the lowest. Our results suggest that the legacy of habitat changes of the Quaternary is still detectable in the extant distribution of many fish species, especially those with small body size and the most sedentary. Because they were the least able to colonize distant habitats in the past, fish species with smaller body size might have the most pronounced lags in tracking ongoing climate change.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2108
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