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Auteur Giannoulaki, M.; Iglesias, M.; Tugores, M.P.; Bonanno, A.; Patti, B.; Felice, A.D.; Leonori, I.; BIGOT, J.-L.; Ticina, V.; Pyrounaki, M.M.; Tsagarakis, K.; Machias, A.; Somarakis, S.; Schismenou, E.; Quinci, E.; Basilone, G.; Cuttitta, A.; Campanella, F.; Miquel, J.; Onate, D.; ROOS, D.; Valavanis, V.
Titre Characterizing the potential habitat of European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in the Mediterranean Sea, at different life stages Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Oceanography
Volume 22 Numéro 2 Pages 69-89
Mots-Clés anchovy; anchovy potential nurseries; habitat suitability modelling; Mediterranean sea; small pelagics
Résumé Identification of the potential habitat of European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) at different life stages in relation to environmental conditions is an interesting subject from both ecological and management points of view. For this purpose, acoustic data from different seasons and different parts of the Mediterranean Sea along with satellite environmental and bathymetry data were modelled using generalized additive models. Similarly, egg distribution data from summer ichthyoplankton surveys were used to model potential spawning habitat. Selected models were used to produce maps presenting the probability of anchovy presence (adults, juveniles and eggs) in the entire Mediterranean basin, as a measure of habitat adequacy. Bottom depth and sea surface chlorophyll concentration were the variables found important in all models. Potential anchovy habitats were located over the continental shelf for all life stages examined. An expansion of the potential habitat from the peak spawning (early summer) to the late spawning season (early autumn) was observed. However, the most suitable areas for the presence of anchovy spawners seem to maintain the same size between seasons. Potential juvenile habitats were associated with highly productive inshore waters, being less extended and closer to coast during winter than late autumn. Potential spawning habitat in June and July based on ichthyoplankton surveys overlapped but were wider in extent compared with adult potential habitat from acoustics in the same season. Similarities and dissimilarities between the anchovy habitats as well as comparisons with sardine habitats in the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea and other ecosystems with higher productivity are discussed.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-6006 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 240
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Auteur Queiros, Q.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Gasset, E.; Dutto, G.; Huiban, C.; Metral, L.; Leclerc, L.; Schull, Q.; McKenzie, D.J.; Saraux, C.
Titre Food in the sea: size also matters for pelagic fish Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Numéro Pages Unsp-385
Mots-Clés anchovy; body condition; bottom-up; bottom-up control; experimentation; feeding-behavior; gulf; lions; mediterranean sea; oxidative stress; respiration rate; Sardina pilchardus; sardine sardina-pilchardus; small pelagics; swimming speed
Résumé Small pelagic fish are key components of marine ecosystems and fisheries worldwide. Despite the absence of recruitment failure and overfishing, pelagic fisheries have been in crisis for a decade in the Western Mediterranean Sea because of a marked decline in sardine size and condition. This situation most probably results from bottom-up control and changes in the plankton community toward smaller plankton. To understand such an unusual phenomenon, we developed an original and innovative experimental approach investigating the mechanisms induced by a reduction in the quantity and size of sardine prey. While experimentations offer the unique opportunity to integrate behavior and ecophysiology in understanding key demographic processes, they remain rarely used in fisheries science, even more so on small pelagics due to the notorious difficulty to handle them. The results revealed that food size (without any modification of its energy content) is as important as food quantity for body condition, growth and reserve lipids: sardines that fed on small particles had to consume twice as much as those feeding on large particles to achieve the same condition and growth. Such a strong impact of food size (based on 100 vs. 1200 mu m pellets) was unexpected and may reflect a different energy cost or gain of two feeding behaviors, filter-feeding vs. particulate-feeding, which would have to be tested in further study. As increasing temperature favors planktonic chains of smaller size, climate change might actually accelerate and amplify such phenomenon and thus strongly affect fisheries.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000474405500001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2609
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