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Auteur Besson, M.; Allal, F.; Chatain, B.; Vergnet, A.; Clota, F.; Vandeputte, M. url  doi
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  Titre Combining Individual Phenotypes of Feed Intake With Genomic Data to Improve Feed Efficiency in Sea Bass Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Genet.  
  Volume 10 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Aquaculture; Feed conversation ratio; Fine phenotyping; genomic selection; Individual feed intake; Restricted feeding; selective breeding  
  Résumé Measuring individual feed intake of fish in farms is complex and precludes direct selective breeding for feed conversion ratio (FCR). Here, we estimated the individual FCR of 588 sea bass using individual rearing under restricted feeding. These fish were also phenotyped for their weight loss at fasting and muscle fat content as possible indirect indicators of FCR. The 588 fish were from a full factorial mating between parental lines divergently selected for high (F+) or low (F-) weight loss at fasting. The pedigree was known back to the great grandparents. A subset of 400 offspring and their ancestors were genotyped for 1,110 SNPs, which allowed estimating the genomic heritability of traits. Individual FCR and growth rate in aquarium were both heritable (genomic h² = 0.47 and 0.76, respectively) and strongly genetically correlated (-0.98), meaning that under restricted feeding, faster growing fish were more efficient. FCR in aquariums was significantly better for fish with two F- parents (1.38), worse for fish with two F+ parents (1.51) and intermediate (1.46) for crossbred fish (F+/F- or F-/F+). Muscle fat content was positively genetically correlated to growth rate in aquarium and during fasting. Thus, higher growth rate in aquariums, lower weight loss at fasting and fat content are all traits that could improve FCR in aquarium. Improving these traits would also improve FCR of fish in normal group rearing conditions, as we showed that groups composed of fish with good individual FCR were significantly more efficient in groups. The FCR of groups was also better when the fish composing the groups had, on average, lower estimated breeding values for growth rate during fasting (losing less weight). Thus, FCR in aquarium and weight loss at fasting are both promising to improve FCR of fish in groups. Finally, we showed that the reliability of estimated breeding values was higher (from +10% to +125%) with single-step genomic BLUP than with pedigree-based BLUP, showing that genomic data would enhance the accuracy of EBV prediction o in selection candidates from a limited number of sibs individually phenotyped for FCR in aquariums.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1664-8021 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2542  
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Grunbaum, D.; Hunt, G.L.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Effectiveness of social information used by seabirds searching for unpredictable and ephemeral prey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav. Ecol.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 4 Pages 1223-1234  
  Mots-Clés agent-based model; albatrosses; antarctic krill; central place foragers; colonies; evolution; foraging model; gannets; Habitat selection; insights; local enhancement; local enhancement; models; public information; search strategies  
  Résumé Understanding how seabirds and other central place foragers locate food resources represents a key step in predicting responses to changes in resource abundance and distribution. Where prey distributions are unpredictable and ephemeral, seabirds may gain up-to-date information by monitoring the direction of birds returning to the colony or by monitoring the foraging behavior of other birds through local enhancement. However, search strategies based on social information may require high population densities, raising concerns about the potential loss of information in declining populations. Our objectives were to explore the mechanisms that underpin effective search strategies based on social information under a range of population densities and different foraging conditions. Testing relevant hypotheses through field observation is challenging because of limitations in the ability to manipulate population densities and foraging conditions. We therefore developed a spatially explicit individual-based foraging model, informed by data on the movement and foraging patterns of seabirds foraging on pelagic prey, and used model simulations to investigate the mechanisms underpinning search strategies. Orientation of outbound headings in line with returning birds enables departing birds to avoid areas without prey even at relatively low population densities. The mechanisms underpinning local enhancement are more effective as population densities increase and may be facilitated by other mechanisms that concentrate individuals in profitable areas. For seabirds and other central place foragers foraging on unpredictable and ephemeral food resources, information is especially valuable when resources are spatially concentrated and may play an important role in mitigating poor foraging conditions.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2068  
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Auteur Courbin, N.; Besnard, A.; Peron, C.; Saraux, C.; Fort, J.; Perret, S.; Tornos, J.; Gremillet, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Short-term prey field lability constrains individual specialisation in resource selection and foraging site fidelity in a marine predator Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 7 Pages 1043-1054  
  Mots-Clés behavior; Behavioural consistency; Calonectris diomedea; diet; ecology; foraging site fidelity; gannets; habitat selection; mediterranean sea; models; movement; resource selection; Scopoli's shearwater; seabirds; strategies; temporal resource dynamic; Western Mediterranean  
  Résumé Spatio-temporally stable prey distributions coupled with individual foraging site fidelity are predicted to favour individual resource specialisation. Conversely, predators coping with dynamic prey distributions should diversify their individual diet and/or shift foraging areas to increase net intake. We studied individual specialisation in Scopoli's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) from the highly dynamic Western Mediterranean, using daily prey distributions together with resource selection, site fidelity and trophic-level analyses. As hypothesised, we found dietary diversification, low foraging site fidelity and almost no individual specialisation in resource selection. Crucially, shearwaters switched daily foraging tactics, selecting areas with contrasting prey of varying trophic levels. Overall, information use and plastic resource selection of individuals with reduced short-term foraging site fidelity allow predators to overcome prey field lability. Our study is an essential step towards a better understanding of individual responses to enhanced environmental stochasticity driven by global changes, and of pathways favouring population persistence.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2380  
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Auteur Cox, S.L.; Embling, C.B.; Hosegood, P.J.; Votier, S.C.; Ingram, S.N. doi  openurl
  Titre Oceanographic drivers of marine mammal and seabird habitat-use across shelf-seas: A guide to key features and recommendations for future research and conservation management Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.  
  Volume 212 Numéro Pages 294-310  
  Mots-Clés Bio-physical coupling; bottle-nosed dolphins; california current system; coastal upwelling system; Conservation management; ecosystem-based management; Foraging ecology; Habitat selection; Marine mammals; Oceanography; porpoise phocoena-phocoena; predator-prey interactions; Seabirds; southeastern bering-sea; st-george island; thin zooplankton layers; tidal-stream environments  
  Résumé Mid-latitude (similar to 30-60 degrees) seasonally stratifying shelf-seas support a high abundance and diversity of marine predators such as marine mammals and seabirds. However, anthropogenic activities and climate change impacts are driving changes in the distributions and population dynamics of these animals, with negative consequences for ecosystem functioning. Across mid-latitude shelf-seas marine mammals and seabirds are known to forage across a number of oceanographic habitats that structure the spatio-temporal distributions of prey fields. Knowledge of these and the bio-physical mechanisms driving such associations are needed to improve marine management and policy. Here, we provide a concise and easily accessible guide for both researchers and managers of marine systems on the predominant oceanographic habitats that are favoured for foraging by marine mammals and seabirds across mid-latitude shelf-seas. We (1) identify and describe key discrete physical features present across the continental shelf, working inshore from the shelf-edge to the shore line, (2) provide an overview of findings relating to associations between these habitats and marine mammals and seabirds, (3) identify areas for future research and (4) discuss the relevance of such information to conservation management. We show that oceanographic features preferentially foraged at by marine mammals and seabirds include shelf edge fronts, upwelling and tidal-mixing fronts, offshore banks and internal waves, regions of stratification, and topographically complex coastal areas subject to strong tidal flow. Whilst associations were variable across taxa and through space and time, in the majority of cases interactions between bathymetry and tidal currents appear to play a dominant role, alongside patterns in seasonal stratification and shelf-edge upwelling. We suggest that the ecological significance of these bio-physical structures stems from a capacity to alter the densities, distributions (both horizontally and vertically) and/or behaviours of prey in a persistent and/or predictable manner that increases accessibility for predators, and likely enhances foraging efficiency. Future conservation management should aim to preserve and protect these habitats. This will require adaptive and holistic strategies that are specifically tailored to the characteristics of an oceanographic feature, and where necessary, evolve through space and time in response to spatio-temporal variability. Improved monitoring of animal movements and biophysical conditions across shelf-seas would aid in this. Areas for future research include multi-disciplinary/ trophic studies of the mechanisms linking bio-physical processes, prey and marine mammals and seabirds (which may elucidate the importance of lesser studied features such as bottom fronts and Langmuir circulation cells), alongside a better understanding of how predators perceive their environment and develop foraging strategies during immature/juvenile stages. Estimates of the importance of oceanographic habitat features at a population level should also be obtained. Such information is vital to ensuring the future health of these complex ecosystems, and can be used to assess how anthropogenic activities and future environmental changes will impact the functioning and spatio-temporal dynamics of these bio-physical features and their use by marine predators.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2428  
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Fortin, M.-J.; Lasram, F.; Belmaker, J.; Rocklin, D.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Evol. Appl.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 8 Pages 1437-1447  
  Mots-Clés caribbean reef fish; connectivity; divergent selection; ecological data; ecological genetics; landscape genetics; marine connectivity; marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mullus surmuletus; neighbor matrices; oceanography; population-structure; sea; seascape genetics; single nucleotide polymorphism; surmuletus  
  Résumé Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea. Univariate multiple regressions were used to test the influence of environment (salinity and temperature), geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies. We used Moran's eigenvector maps (db-MEMs) and asymmetric eigenvector maps (AEMs) to decompose geographic and dispersal distances in predictors representing different spatial scales. We found that salinity and temperature had only a weak effect on the variation in allele frequencies. Our results revealed the predominance of geographic isolation to explain variation in allele frequencies at large spatial scale (>1,000km), while larval dispersal was the major predictor at smaller spatial scale (<1,000km). Our findings stress the importance of including spatial scales to understand the drivers of spatial genetic variation. We suggest that larval dispersal allows to maintain gene flows at small to intermediate scale, while at broad scale, genetic variation may be mostly shaped by adult mobility, demographic history, or multigenerational stepping-stone dispersal. These findings bring out important spatial scale considerations to account for in the design of a protected area network that would efficiently enhance protection and persistence capacity of marine species.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2422  
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