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Auteur Keller, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Alvarez-Berastegui, D.; Bitetto, I.; Casciaro, L.; Cuccu, D.; Esteban, A.; Garofalo, G.; Gonzalez, M.; Guijarro, B.; Josephides, M.; Jadaud, A.; Lefkaditou, E.; Maiorano, P.; Manfredi, C.; Marceta, B.; Micallef, R.; Peristeraki, P.; Relini, G.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T.; Tserpes, G.; Quetglas, A. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Demersal cephalopod communities in the Mediterranean: a large-scale analysis Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 584 Numéro Pages 105-118  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; population-dynamics; fisheries; gulf; Bottom trawl surveys; fish assemblages; Mediterranean; continental-shelf; life-history; fluctuations; upper slope; Cephalopods; medits; catalan sea; Community analysis; Environmental gradients  
  Résumé Cephalopod assemblages at the scale of the entire Mediterranean Sea were analysed using information from 2 decades of standardized scientific bottom trawl surveys. Western and eastern assemblages (6 yr of data) were compared using a combined approach of multivariate ordination techniques and non-linear regressions. These methods enabled us to distinguish assemblages and simultaneously analyse the influence of geographic, bathymetric and environmental (sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentration) gradients on observed community patterns. Despite few differences in species composition between sub-basins, the relative contribution of species differed. Bathymetry was the primary structural driver for the cephalopod communities of both basins, and contributed to 3 assemblages (shallow water, upper slope and middle slope). Winter temperature influenced community assemblages more strongly in the western than in the eastern basin, in contrast to a small but consistent winter productivity influence on community assemblages in both basins. Thus, the environmental parameters analysed did not cause an immediate change in cephalopod assemblages, but rather an effect lagged by several months. Differences in the relative importance of environmental drivers show that different processes operate in the 2 basins. These results demonstrate similarities and differences between Mediterranean basins regarding important cephalopod functional groups. This information should help integrative ecosystem management approaches currently used in fisheries and conservation management.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2261  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 610 Numéro Pages 51-63  
  Mots-Clés biomass; Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; competition; Density dependence; dynamics; ecosystem; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; flats; populations; seagrass; Seagrass; sediment; site; Soft-sediment habitat; variability  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2593  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series  
  Volume 610 Numéro Pages 51-63  
  Mots-Clés Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; Density dependence; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; Seagrass; Soft-sediment habitat  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630, 1616-1599 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2488  
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Auteur ROA PASCUALI, L.; Demarcq, H.; Nieblas, A.-E. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Detection of mesoscale thermal fronts from 4km data using smoothing techniques: Gradient-based fronts classification and basin scale application Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 164 Numéro Pages 225-237  
  Mots-Clés Mesoscale thermal fronts; Preliminary smoothing; Sea surface temperature; 4 km resolution; Gradient intensity classification; Expert-based approach; Detection efficiency; Indian Ocean  
  Résumé In order to optimize frontal detection in sea surface temperature fields at 4 km resolution, a combined statistical and expert-based approach is applied to test different spatial smoothing of the data prior to the detection process. Fronts are usually detected at 1 km resolution using the histogram-based, single image edge detection (SIED) algorithm developed by Cayula and Cornillon in 1992, with a standard preliminary smoothing using a median filter and a 3 × 3 pixel kernel. Here, detections are performed in three study regions (off Morocco, the Mozambique Channel, and north-western Australia) and across the Indian Ocean basin using the combination of multiple windows (CMW) method developed by Nieto, Demarcq and McClatchie in 2012 which improves on the original Cayula and Cornillon algorithm. Detections at 4 km and 1 km of resolution are compared. Fronts are divided in two intensity classes (“weak” and “strong”) according to their thermal gradient. A preliminary smoothing is applied prior to the detection using different convolutions: three type of filters (median, average and Gaussian) combined with four kernel sizes (3 × 3, 5 × 5, 7 × 7, and 9 × 9 pixels) and three detection window sizes (16 × 16, 24 × 24 and 32 × 32 pixels) to test the effect of these smoothing combinations on reducing the background noise of the data and therefore on improving the frontal detection. The performance of the combinations on 4 km data are evaluated using two criteria: detection efficiency and front length. We find that the optimal combination of preliminary smoothing parameters in enhancing detection efficiency and preserving front length includes a median filter, a 16 × 16 pixel window size, and a 5 × 5 pixel kernel for strong fronts and a 7 × 7 pixel kernel for weak fronts. Results show an improvement in detection performance (from largest to smallest window size) of 71% for strong fronts and 120% for weak fronts. Despite the small window used (16 × 16 pixels), the length of the fronts has been preserved relative to that found with 1 km data. This optimal preliminary smoothing and the CMW detection algorithm on 4 km sea surface temperature data are then used to describe the spatial distribution of the monthly frequencies of occurrence for both strong and weak fronts across the Indian Ocean basin. In general strong fronts are observed in coastal areas whereas weak fronts, with some seasonal exceptions, are mainly located in the open ocean. This study shows that adequate noise reduction done by a preliminary smoothing of the data considerably improves the frontal detection efficiency as well as the global quality of the results. Consequently, the use of 4 km data enables frontal detections similar to 1 km data (using a standard median 3 × 3 convolution) in terms of detectability, length and location. This method, using 4 km data is easily applicable to large regions or at the global scale with far less constraints of data manipulation and processing time relative to 1 km data.  
  Adresse Institut Français pour Recherche et Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), UMR MARBEC (IRD/Ifremer/Université de Montpellier/CNRS), Station Ifremer Avenue Jean Monnet, CS 30171, 34203 Sète CEDEX, France  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 37998 collection 1230  
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Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biology  
  Volume 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388  
  Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water  
  Résumé The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539  
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