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Auteur Tew-Kai, E.; Marsac, F.
Titre Patterns of variability of sea surface chlorophyll in the Mozambique Channel : a quantitative approach Type Article scientifique
Année 2009 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Journal of Marine Systems
Volume 77 Numéro 1-2 Pages 77-88
Mots-Clés Climate forcing; Mesoscale; Mozambique Channel; Quantitative approach; Seasonal variability; Sea Surface chlorophyll
Résumé We analyse the coupling between sea surface chlorophyll concentration (CC) and the physical environment in the Mozambique Channel (MZC) using statistical models. Seasonal and interannual patterns are studied along with the role of mesoscale dynamics on enhancement and concentration processes for phytoplankton. We use SeaWifs data for CC and two other remotely sensed data sets, TMMI for sea surface temperature (SST) and merged altimetry products for sea level anomaly and geostrophic current. Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) on SSC and SST show strong seasonality and partition the MZC into three distinct sub-areas. The chlorophyll variability is mostly driven by seasonality, but more in the North (10 degrees S-16 degrees S) and South (24 degrees S-30 degrees S), and explains respectively 64% and 82% of the CC variance. In the Central part (16 degrees S-24 degrees S), the seasonal signal has less influence (60% variance). There, complex EOFs on Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) highlight the role of mesoscale activity (i.e. eddies and filament structures) in the spatial distribution of chlorophyll. Five mesoscale descriptors (shear, stretch, vorticity, deformation and eddy kinetic energy) are derived from the altimetry data to quantify the eddies-related physical patterns in the central region of the MZC. We use generalized Additive Models to explain the effect of those features on phytoplankton enhancement. The best model fit (r(2) = 0.73) includes shear, stretch, vorticity and the latitude-longitude interaction as eddies are well structured in space. Cyclonic eddies associated with negative vorticity are conductive to phytoplankton enhancement by the effect of upwelling in the core notably during the spin-up phase. The interaction between eddies generate strong frontal mixing favourable to the production and aggregation of organic matter. The mesoscale activity is also affected by interannual variability with consequences on CC. We highlight a substantial reduction of the SLA pattern in 2000-2001 when the SOI positive phase is peaking (Nina-type pattern). The strong relationship between mesoscale eddies and SOI suggests that primary productivity in the MZC is also under the influence of distant forcing at a basin scale.
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ISSN 0924-7963 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 13
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Auteur Chassot, E.; Duplisea, D.; Hammill, M.; Caskenette, A.; Bousquet, N.; Lambert, Y.; Stenson, G.
Titre Role of predation by harp seals Pagophilus groenlandicus in the collapse and non-recovery of northern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod Gadus morhua Type Article scientifique
Année 2009 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 379 Numéro Pages 279-297
Mots-Clés cod; functional response; harp seal; model; predation; recovery
Résumé A statistical catch-at-age model was developed to assess the effects of predation by the northwest Atlantic harp seal population on northern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod by estimating the relative importance of different sources of mortality that affected the stock during a period of collapse and non-recovery. Cod recruitment at age 1 is modeled via a non-linear stock-recruitment relationship based on total egg production and accounts for changes in female length-at-maturity and cod condition. Natural mortality other than seal predation also depends on cod condition used as an integrative index of changes in environmental conditions. The linkage between seals and cod is modeled through a multi-age functional response that was derived from the reconstruction of the seal diet using morphometric relationships and stomach contents of more than 200 seals collected between 1998 and 2001. The model was fitted following a maximum likelihood estimation approach to a scientific survey abundance index (1984 to 2006). Model results show that the collapse of the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod stock was mainly due to the combination of high fishing mortality rates and poor environmental conditions in the early to mid-1990s contributing to the current state of recruitment overfishing. The increase in harp seal abundance during 1984 to 2006 was reflected by an increase in predation mortality for the young cod age-groups targeted by seals. Although current levels of predation mortality affect cod spawning biomass, the lack of recovery of the NGSL cod stock seems mainly due to the very poor recruitment.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Eng Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 15
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Grunbaum, D.; Hunt, G.L.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S.
Titre Effectiveness of social information used by seabirds searching for unpredictable and ephemeral prey Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Behav. Ecol.
Volume 27 Numéro 4 Pages 1223-1234
Mots-Clés agent-based model; albatrosses; antarctic krill; central place foragers; colonies; evolution; foraging model; gannets; Habitat selection; insights; local enhancement; local enhancement; models; public information; search strategies
Résumé Understanding how seabirds and other central place foragers locate food resources represents a key step in predicting responses to changes in resource abundance and distribution. Where prey distributions are unpredictable and ephemeral, seabirds may gain up-to-date information by monitoring the direction of birds returning to the colony or by monitoring the foraging behavior of other birds through local enhancement. However, search strategies based on social information may require high population densities, raising concerns about the potential loss of information in declining populations. Our objectives were to explore the mechanisms that underpin effective search strategies based on social information under a range of population densities and different foraging conditions. Testing relevant hypotheses through field observation is challenging because of limitations in the ability to manipulate population densities and foraging conditions. We therefore developed a spatially explicit individual-based foraging model, informed by data on the movement and foraging patterns of seabirds foraging on pelagic prey, and used model simulations to investigate the mechanisms underpinning search strategies. Orientation of outbound headings in line with returning birds enables departing birds to avoid areas without prey even at relatively low population densities. The mechanisms underpinning local enhancement are more effective as population densities increase and may be facilitated by other mechanisms that concentrate individuals in profitable areas. For seabirds and other central place foragers foraging on unpredictable and ephemeral food resources, information is especially valuable when resources are spatially concentrated and may play an important role in mitigating poor foraging conditions.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2068
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Benestan, L.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Manel, S.
Titre Combining six genome scan methods to detect candidate genes to salinity in the Mediterranean striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée BMC Genomics
Volume 19 Numéro Pages 217
Mots-Clés Adaptive genomics; Candidate genes; climate; genetics; Genome scan; landscape genomics; local adaptation; Mediterranean Sea; methionine sulfoxide reductase; Mullus surmuletus; population genomics; principal component analysis; r package; Salinity; selection; threespine sticklebacks
Résumé Background: Adaptive genomics may help predicting how a species will respond to future environmental changes. Genomic signatures of local adaptation in marine organisms are often driven by environmental selective agents impacting the physiology of organisms. With one of the highest salinity level, the Mediterranean Sea provides an excellent model to investigate adaptive genomic divergence underlying salinity adaptation. In the present study, we combined six genome scan methods to detect potential genomic signal of selection in the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) populations distributed across a wide salinity gradient. We then blasted these outlier sequences on published fish genomic resources in order to identify relevant potential candidate genes for salinity adaptation in this species. Results: Altogether, the six genome scan methods found 173 outliers out of 1153 SNPs. Using a blast approach, we discovered four candidate SNPs belonging to three genes potentially implicated in adaptation of M. surmuletus to salinity. The allele frequency at one of these SNPs significantly increases with salinity independently from the effect of longitude. The gene associated to this SNP, SOCS2, encodes for an inhibitor of cytokine and has previously been shown to be expressed under osmotic pressure in other marine organisms. Additionally, our results showed that genome scan methods not correcting for spatial structure can still be an efficient strategy to detect potential footprints of selection, when the spatial and environmental variation are confounded, and then, correcting for spatial structure in a second step represents a conservative method. Conclusion: The present outcomes bring evidences of potential genomic footprint of selection, which suggest an adaptive response of M. surmuletus to salinity conditions in the Mediterranean Sea. Additional genomic data such as sequencing of a full-genome and transcriptome analyses of gene expression would provide new insights regarding the possibility that some striped red mullet populations are locally adapted to their saline environment.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1471-2164 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2324
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Auteur Bettarel, Y.; Halary, S.; Auguet, J.-C.; Mai, T.C.; Bui, N.V.; Bouvier, T.; Got, P.; Bouvier, C.; Monteil-Bouchard, S.; Christelle, D.
Titre Corallivory and the microbial debacle in two branching scleractinians Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 12 Numéro 4 Pages 1109-1126
Mots-Clés brown band disease; coral-associated bacteria; diversity; drupella-cornus; great-barrier-reef; network analysis; red-sea; search tool; viral communities; viruses
Résumé The grazing activity by specific marine organisms represents a growing threat to the survival of many scleractinian species. For example, the recent proliferation of the corallivorous gastropod Drupella now constitutes a critical case in all South-East Asian waters. If the damaging effects caused by this marine snail on coral polyps are relatively well known, the indirect incidence of predation on coral microbial associates is still obscure and might also potentially impair coral health. In this study, we compared the main ecological traits of coral-associated bacterial and viral communities living in the mucus layer of Acropora formosa and Acropora millepora, of healthy and predated individuals (i.e., colonized by Drupella rugosa), in the Bay of Van Phong (Vietnam). Our results show a substantial impact of the gastropod on a variety of microbiological markers. Colonized corals harbored much more abundant and active epibiotic bacteria whose community composition shifted toward more pathogenic taxa (belonging to the Vibrionales, Clostridiales, Campylobacterales, and Alteromonadales orders), together with their specific phages. Viral epibionts were also greatly influenced by Drupella corallivory with spectacular modifications in their concentrations, life strategies, genotype richness, and diversity. Novel and abundant circular Rep-encoding ssDNA viruses (CRESS-DNA viruses) were detected and characterized in grazed corals and we propose that their occurrence may serve as indicator of the coral health status. Finally, our results reveal that corallivory can cause severe dysbiosis by altering virus-bacteria interactions in the mucus layer, and ultimately favoring the development of local opportunistic infections.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2325
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