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Auteur Van Dover, C.L.; Aronson, J.; Pendleton, L.; Smith, S.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Moreno-Mateos, D.; Barbier, E.; Billett, D.; Bowers, K.; Danovaro, R.; Edwards, A.; Kellert, S.; Morato, T.; Pollard, E.; Rogers, A.; Warner, R.
Titre Ecological Restoration in the Deep Sea: Desiderata Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume 44 Numéro Pages 98-106
Mots-Clés Cold-water corals; Deep-sea resource use; Hydrothermal vents; Marine policy; Restoration science
Résumé An era of expanding deep-ocean industrialization is before us, with policy makers establishing governance frameworks for sustainable management of deep-sea resources while scientists learn more about the ecological structure and functioning of the largest biome on the planet. Missing from discussion of the stewardship of the deep ocean is ecological restoration. If existing activities in the deep sea continue or are expanded and new deep-ocean industries are developed, there is need to consider what is required to minimize or repair resulting damages to the deep-sea environment. In addition, thought should be given as to how any past damage can be rectified. This paper develops the discourse on deep-sea restoration and offers guidance on planning and implementing ecological restoration projects for deep-sea ecosystems that are already, or are at threat of becoming, degraded, damaged or destroyed. Two deep-sea restoration case studies or scenarios are described (deep-sea stony corals on the Darwin Mounds off the west coast of Scotland, deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) and are contrasted with on-going saltmarsh restoration in San Francisco Bay. For these case studies, a set of socio-economic, ecological, and technological decision parameters that might favor (or not) their restoration are examined. Costs for hypothetical restoration scenarios in the deep sea are estimated and first indications suggest they may be two to three orders of magnitude greater per hectare than costs for restoration efforts in shallow-water marine systems.
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Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA.<br/>Author Address: CNRS, Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, F-34033 Montpellier, France.<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Inst Environm Policy Solut, Durham, NC 27708 USA.<br/>Author Address: Nautilus Minerals, Milton, Qld, Australia.<br/>Author Address: IFREMER, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Stanford Univ, Woodside, CA 94062 USA.<br/>Author Address: Dept Econ & Finance, Laramie, WY 82071 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Southampton, Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.<br/>Author Address: Biohabitats, N Charleston, SC 29405 USA.<br/>Author Address: Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Life & Environm Sci, I-601321 Ancona, Italy.<br/>Author Address: Newcastle Univ, Sch Biol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England.<br/>Author Address: Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Acores, Dept Oceanog & Pescas, Ctr IMAR, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: LARSyS Associated Lab, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: EURC, Biodivers Consultancy, Cambridge CB2 1RR, England.<br/>Author Address: Dept Zool, Oxford OX1 3PS, England.<br/>Author Address: Univ Wollongong, Australian Natl Ctr Ocean Resources & Secur, North Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.<br/>PB – Elsevier Sci Ltd<br/> Approuvé pas de
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Auteur Jaspers, C.; Huwer, B.; Antajan, E.; Hosia, A.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Biastoch, A.; Angel, D.; Asmus, R.; Augustin, C.; Bagheri, S.; Beggs, S.E.; Balsby, T.J.S.; Boersma, M.; Bonnet, D.; Christensen, J.T.; Daenhardt, A.; Delpy, F.; Falkenhaug, T.; Finenko, G.; Fleming, N.E.C.; Fuentes, V.; Galil, B.; Gittenberger, A.; Griffin, D.C.; Haslob, H.; Javidpour, J.; Kamburska, L.; Kube, S.; Langenberg, V.T.; Lehtiniemi, M.; Lombard, F.; Malzahn, A.; Marambio, M.; Mihneva, V.; Moller, L.F.; Niermann, U.; Okyar, M.I.; Ozdemir, Z.B.; Pitois, S.; Reusch, T.B.H.; Robbens, J.; Stefanova, K.; Thibault, D.; van der Veer, H.W.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; Wozniczka, A.
Titre Ocean current connectivity propelling the secondary spread of a marine invasive comb jelly across western Eurasia Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 27 Numéro 7 Pages 814-827
Mots-Clés abundance; biodiversity; biological invasions; black-sea; caspian sea; consequences; ctenophore mnemiopsis-leidyi; gelatinous zooplankton; invasion corridors; invasive species; jellyfish; larval transport; marine connectivity; Mnemiopsis leidyi; north-sea; range expansion; source populations; source-sink dynamics; waters; zooplankton
Résumé Aim: Invasive species are of increasing global concern. Nevertheless, the mechanisms driving further distribution after the initial establishment of non-native species remain largely unresolved, especially in marine systems. Ocean currents can be a major driver governing range occupancy, but this has not been accounted for in most invasion ecology studies so far. We investigate how well initial establishment areas are interconnected to later occupancy regions to test for the potential role of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics in order to infer invasion corridors and the source-sink dynamics of a non-native holoplanktonic biological probe species on a continental scale. Location: Western Eurasia. Time period: 1980s-2016. Major taxa studied: 'Comb jelly' Mnemiopsis leidyi. Methods: Based on 12,400 geo-referenced occurrence data, we reconstruct the invasion history of M. leidyi in western Eurasia. We model ocean currents and calculate their stability to match the temporal and spatial spread dynamics with large-scale connectivity patterns via ocean currents. Additionally, genetic markers are used to test the predicted connectivity between subpopulations. Results: Ocean currents can explain secondary spread dynamics, matching observed range expansions and the timing of first occurrence of our holoplanktonic non-native biological probe species, leading to invasion corridors in western Eurasia. In northern Europe, regional extinctions after cold winters were followed by rapid recolonizations at a speed of up to 2,000 km per season. Source areas hosting year-round populations in highly interconnected regions can re-seed genotypes over large distances after local extinctions. Main conclusions: Although the release of ballast water from container ships may contribute to the dispersal of non-native species, our results highlight the importance of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics. Highly interconnected areas hosting invasive species are crucial for secondary spread dynamics on a continental scale. Invasion risk assessments should consider large-scale connectivity patterns and the potential source regions of non-native marine species.
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Auteur Quispe-Ccalluari, C.; Tam, J.; Demarcq, H.; Chamorro, A.; Espinoza-Morriberon, D.; Romero, C.; Dominguez, N.; Ramos, J.; Oliveros-Ramos, R.
Titre An index of coastal thermal effects of El Nino Southern Oscillation on the Peruvian Upwelling Ecosystem Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Int. J. Climatol.
Volume 38 Numéro 7 Pages 3191-3201
Mots-Clés climate; coastal index; eastern tropical pacific; enso; Equatorial Pacific Ocean; events; ocean; Peruvian Upwelling Ecosystem; sea-surface temperature; wind
Résumé The Peruvian Upwelling Ecosystem (PUE) is one of the most productive ecosystem in the world in terms of productivity and fish catches, partly because its geographical location is affected by remote physical processes, such as the interannual climate variability of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (EPO), whose dominant signal is El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In order to assess the thermal effects of ENSO off Peru, a Peruvian Coastal Thermal Index (PCTI) was developed representing 87.7% of the total variation of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies of the PUE. Between 1982 and 2014, the PCTI detected 12 warm periods and 16 cold periods in the PUE. PCTI had a linear trend component, a low frequency component and a noise component, with 1.5%, 94.5% and 4% contributions to the total variance, respectively. Wavelet analysis of PCTI showed significant peaks of variability between the years 1996 and 1999 between periods of 0.4 and 6 years. A regime shift in variance of PCTI was detected in 1999, with a lower variance between 1999 and 2014 than between 1982 and 1998, which agreed with the start of a cold phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The decrease of variance of the PCTI could be linked to an increase of the local winds associated with a higher intensity of the average state of South Pacific Anticyclone. This atmospheric change might have strengthened the coastal upwelling and counteracted the intensity of warm periods in the PUE. Finally, the comparison of different indexes allowed to detect four periods where neutral conditions occurred in the EPO while warm periods occurred in the PUE (1993, 2008, 2012 and 2014); and 1 period where a warm episode occurred in the EPO (2004-2005) while a neutral condition occurred in the PUE.
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Auteur Sebastian, M.; Smith, A.F.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Fredricks, H.F.; Van Mooy, B.; Koblizek, M.; Brandsma, J.; Koster, G.; Mestre, M.; Mostajir, B.; Pitta, P.; Postle, A.D.; Sanchez, P.; Gasol, J.M.; Scanlan, D.J.; Chen, Y.
Titre Lipid remodelling is a widespread strategy in marine heterotrophic bacteria upon phosphorus deficiency Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 10 Numéro 4 Pages 968-978
Mots-Clés 2 enzymes; agrobacterium-tumefaciens; bacterioplankton groups; Ecology; Mediterranean Sea; mesocosm experiment; microbial food-web; north-atlantic ocean; nutrient limitation; phosphate starvation
Résumé Upon phosphorus (P) deficiency, marine phytoplankton reduce their requirements for P by replacing membrane phospholipids with alternative non-phosphorus lipids. It was very recently demonstrated that a SAR11 isolate also shares this capability when phosphate starved in culture. Yet, the extent to which this process occurs in other marine heterotrophic bacteria and in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the substitution of membrane phospholipids for a variety of non-phosphorus lipids is a conserved response to P deficiency among phylogenetically diverse marine heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. By deletion mutagenesis and complementation in the model marine bacterium Phaeobacter sp. MED193 and heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli, we confirm the roles of a phospholipase C (PlcP) and a glycosyltransferase in lipid remodelling. Analyses of the Global Ocean Sampling and Tara Oceans metagenome data sets demonstrate that PlcP is particularly abundant in areas characterized by low phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, we show that lipid remodelling occurs seasonally and responds to changing nutrient conditions in natural microbial communities from the Mediterranean Sea. Together, our results point to the key role of lipid substitution as an adaptive strategy enabling heterotrophic bacteria to thrive in the vast P-depleted areas of the ocean.
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Auteur Clavier, J.; Chauvaud, L.; Carlier, A.; Amice, E.; van der Geest, M.; Labrosse, P.; Diagne, A.; Hily, C.
Titre Aerial and underwater carbon metabolism of a Zostera noltii seagrass bed in the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania Type Article scientifique
Année 2011 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Aquatic Botany
Volume 95 Numéro Pages 24-30
Mots-Clés Zostera noltii Seagrass Metabolism Intertidal Respiration Primary production Africa Isotope wadden sea marine angiosperms seasonal-variation coastal lagoon hornem photosynthesis oxygen respiration dynamics dioxide
Résumé Community respiration and primary production were measured in a dense intertidal Zostera noltii bed on the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania (West Africa) under aerial and submerged conditions. Metabolism was studied in situ in dark and transparent benthic chambers. CO(2) fluxes in the air were measured over a series of short-term incubations (3 min) using an infrared gas analyzer. Dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes were calculated from concentration changes during one-hour underwater incubations. Air and underwater irradiance levels were measured every minute throughout the experiments. Carbon respiration was lower in the air (2.2 mmol m(-2) h(-1)) than underwater (5.0 mmol m(-2) h(-1)); similarly, a production-irradiance model fitted to the data indicated that gross maximal photosynthetic rate was markedly lower during emergence (6.0 mmol C m(-2) h(-1)) than under water (42.7 mmol C m(-2) h(-1)). The delta(13)C values observed in shoots indicated a decrease in atmospheric CO(2) contribution, compared to dissolved inorganic carbon, in Z. noltii metabolism along a depth gradient within a single location. As the seagrass bed remains under a thin layer of water at low tide at the studied site, the large difference in primary production can be mainly attributed to photosynthesis inhibition by high pH and oxygen concentration, as well as to the negative feedback of self-shading by seagrass leaves during emersion. The observed differences in respiration can be explained by the oxygen deficit at night during low tide near the sediment surface, a deficit that is consistent with the abundance of anoxia-tolerant species. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Adresse [Clavier, Jacques] IUEM, CNRS, UMR 6539, LEMAR,Lab Sci Environm Marin, F-29280 Plouzane, France. [Van der Geest, Matthijs] NIOZ, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Netherlands. [Labrosse, Pierre; Diagne, Ahmed] IMROP, Nouadhibou, Mauritania. Clavier, J (reprint author), IUEM, CNRS, UMR 6539, LEMAR,Lab Sci Environm Marin, Pl Nicolas Copernic, F-29280 Plouzane, France. Jacques.Clavier@univ-brest.fr
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Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 781BF Times Cited: 2 Cited Reference Count: 72 Clavier, Jacques Chauvaud, Laurent Carlier, Antoine Amice, Erwan Van der Geest, Matthijs Labrosse, Pierre Diagne, Ahmed Hily, Christian Franco-Mauritanian PACOBA project; Oceanographic and Fisheries Research Mauritanian Institute (IMROP); Banc d'Arguin National Park (PNBA) This study was funded by the Franco-Mauritanian PACOBA project. We thank the Oceanographic and Fisheries Research Mauritanian Institute (IMROP) and the Banc d'Arguin National Park (PNBA) for their support. Elsevier science bv Amsterdam Approuvé pas de
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