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Auteur (up) Amélineau, F.; Grémillet, D.; Bonnet, D.; Bot, T.L.; Fort, J.
Titre Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 11 Numéro 7 Pages e0157764
Mots-Clés Birds; Copepods; Foraging; Predation; Seabirds; Sea ice; Trophic interactions; Zooplankton
Résumé The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1592
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Auteur (up) Annasawmy, P.; Ternon, J.-F.; Cotel, P.; Cherel, Y.; Romanov, E.; Roudaut, G.; Lebourges-Dhaussy, A.; Menard, F.; Marsac, F.
Titre Micronekton distributions and assemblages at two shallow seamounts of the south-western Indian Ocean: Insights from acoustics and mesopelagic trawl data Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.
Volume 178 Numéro Pages 102161
Mots-Clés Acoustics; deep-scattering layer; diel migration; fish aggregations; mesoscale features; Micronekton; mozambique channel; myctophid fishes; pelagic communities; Seamount; Seamount-associated fauna; South-western Indian Ocean; species identification; target strength; vertical-distribution
Résumé Micronekton distributions and assemblages were investigated at two shallow seamounts of the south-western Indian Ocean using a combination of trawl data and a multi-frequency acoustic visualisation technique. La Pa rouse seamount (summit depth similar to 60 m) is located on the outskirts of the oligotrophic Indian South Subtropical Gyre (ISSG) province with weak mesoscale activities and low primary productivity all year round. The “MAD-Ridge” seamount (thus termed in this study; similar to 240 m) is located in the productive East African Coastal (EAFR) province with high mesoscale activities to the south of Madagascar. Higher micronekton species richness was recorded at MAD-Ridge compared to La Perouse. Resulting productivity at MAD-Ridge seamount was likely due to the action of mesoscale eddies advecting productivity and larvae from the Madagascar shelf rather than local dynamic processes such as Taylor column formation. Mean micronekton abundance/biomass, as estimated from mesopelagic trawl catches, were lower over the summit compared to the vicinity of the seamounts, due to net selectivity and catchability and depth gradient on micronekton assemblages. Mean acoustic densities in the night shallow scattering layer (SSL: 10-200 m) over the summit were not significantly different compared to the vicinity (within 14 nautical miles) of MAD-Ridge. At La Perouse and MAD-Ridge, the night and day SSL were dominated by common diel vertically migrant and non-migrant micronekton species respectively. While seamount-associated mesopelagic fishes such as Diaphus suborbitalis (La Perouse and MAD-Ridge) and Benthosema fibula= performed diel vertical migrations (DVM) along the seamounts' flanks, seamount-resident benthopelagic fishes, including Cookeolus japonicus (MAD-Ridge), were aggregated over MAD-Ridge summit. Before sunrise, mid-water migrants initiated their vertical migration from the intermediate to the deep scattering layer (DSL, La Perouse: 500-650 m; MAD-Ridge: 400-700 m) or deeper. During sunrise, the other taxa contributing to the night SSL exhibited a series of vertical migration events from the surface to the DSL or deeper until all migrants have reached the DSL before daytime. Possible mechanisms leading to the observed patterns in micronekton vertical and horizontal distributions are discussed. This study contributes to a better understanding of how seamounts influence the DVM, horizontal distribution and community composition of micronekton and seamount-associated/resident species at two poorly studied shallow topographic features in the south-western Indian Ocean.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000496861900013 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2666
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Auteur (up) Arnaud-Haond, S.; Aires, T.; Candeias, R.; Teixeira, S.J.L.; Duarte, C.M.; Valero, M.; Serrao, E.A.
Titre Entangled fates of holobiont genomes during invasion: nested bacterial and host diversities in Caulerpa taxifolia Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 26 Numéro 8 Pages 2379-2391
Mots-Clés Algae; australia; Caulerpa; Chlorophyta; clonal diversity; dna; endophytic communities; genetic diversity; holobiont; invasion paradox; marine invasion; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; parasites; plant invasions; polymorphism
Résumé Successful prevention and mitigation of biological invasions requires retracing the initial steps of introduction, as well as understanding key elements enhancing the adaptability of invasive species. We studied the genetic diversity of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and its associated bacterial communities in several areas around the world. The striking congruence of alpha and beta diversity of the algal genome and endophytic communities reveals a tight association, supporting the holobiont concept as best describing the unit of spreading and invasion. Both genomic compartments support the hypotheses of a unique accidental introduction in the Mediterranean and of multiple invasion events in southern Australia. In addition to helping with tracing the origin of invasion, bacterial communities exhibit metabolic functions that can potentially enhance adaptability and competitiveness of the consortium they form with their host. We thus hypothesize that low genetic diversities of both host and symbiont communities may contribute to the recent regression in the Mediterranean, in contrast with the persistence of highly diverse assemblages in southern Australia. This study supports the importance of scaling up from the host to the holobiont for a comprehensive understanding of invasions.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2143
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Auteur (up) ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; MOALIC, Y.; HERNANDEZ-GARCIA, E.; EGUILUZ, V.M.; ALBERTO, F.; SERRAO, E.A.; DUARTE, C.M.
Titre Disentangling the Influence of Mutation and Migration in Clonal Seagrasses Using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum for Microsatellites Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal Of Heredity
Volume 105 Numéro 4 Pages 532-541
Mots-Clés clonality; genetic divergence; Genetic Diversity Spectrum; microsatellites; Seagrass; stepwise mutation
Résumé The recurrent lack of isolation by distance reported at regional scale in seagrass species was recently suggested to stem from stochastic events of large-scale dispersal. We explored the usefulness of phylogenetic information contained in microsatellite loci to test this hypothesis by using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum (GDS) on databases containing, respectively, 7 and 9 microsatellites genotypes for 1541 sampling units of Posidonia oceanica and 1647 of Cymodocea nodosa. The simultaneous increase of microsatellite and geographic distances that emerges reveals a coherent pattern of isolation by distance in contrast to the chaotic pattern previously described using allele frequencies, in particular, for the long-lived P. oceanica. These results suggest that the lack of isolation by distance, rather than the resulting from rare events of large-scale dispersal, reflects at least for some species a stronger influence of mutation over migration at the scale of the distribution range. The global distribution of genetic polymorphism may, therefore, result predominantly from ancient events of step-by-step (re)colonization followed by local recruitment and clonal growth, rather than contemporary gene flow. The analysis of GDS appears useful to unravel the evolutionary forces influencing the dynamics and evolution at distinct temporal and spatial scales by accounting for phylogenetic information borne by microsatellites, under an appropriate mutation model. This finding adds nuance to the generalization of the influence of large-scale dispersal on the dynamics of seagrasses.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1503 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1138
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Auteur (up) Arnaud-Haond, S.; van den Beld, I.M.J.; Becheler, R.; Orejas, C.; Menot, L.; Frank, N.; Grehan, A.; Bourillet, J.F.
Titre Two “pillars” of cold-water coral reefs along Atlantic European margins: Prevalent association of Madrepora oculata with Lophelia pertusa, from reef to colony scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 145 Numéro Pages 110-119
Mots-Clés community; bay; Bay of Biscay; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; biscay; mediterranean sea; Cold water corals (CWC); deep-sea corals; False-chimaera colonies; fleuve manche; hydrodynamics; Iceland; Ireland; megafauna; mid-norway; ne atlantic
Résumé The scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa has been the focus of deep-sea research since the recognition of the vast extent of coral reefs in North Atlantic waters two decades ago, long after their existence was mentioned by fishermen. These reefs where shown to provide habitat, concentrate biomass and act as feeding or nursery grounds for many species, including those targeted by commercial fisheries. Thus, the attention given to this cold-water coral (CWC) species from researchers and the wider public has increased. Consequently, new research programs triggered research to determine the full extent of the corals geographic distribution and ecological dynamics of “Lophelia reefs”. The present study is based on a systematic standardised sampling design to analyze the distribution and coverage of CWC reefs along European margins from the Bay of Biscay to Iceland. Based on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) image analysis, we report an almost systematic occurrence of Madrepora oculata in association with L. pertusa with similar abundances of both species within explored reefs, despite a tendency of increased abundance of L. pertusa compared to M. oculata toward higher latitudes. This systematic association occasionally reached the colony scale, with “twin” colonies of both species often observed growing next to each other when isolated structures were occurring offireefs. Finally, several “false chimaera” were observed within reefs, confirming that colonial structures can be “coral bushes” formed by an accumulation of multiple colonies even at the inter-specific scale, with no need for self-recognition mechanisms. Thus, we underline the importance of the hitherto underexplored M. oculata in the Eastern Atlantic, reestablishing a more balanced view that both species and their yet unknown interactions are required to better elucidate the ecology, dynamics and fate of European CWC reefs in a changing environment.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2256
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