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Auteur (up) Blasco, F.R.; Esbaugh, A.J.; Killen, S.S.; Rantin, F.T.; Taylor, E.W.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Using aerobic exercise to evaluate sub-lethal tolerance of acute warming in fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Exp. Biol.
Volume 223 Numéro 9 Pages jeb218602
Mots-Clés capacity; climate-change; CTmax; hypoxia tolerance; marine fishes; Oreochromis niloticus; oxygen-tensions; performance; Piaractus mesopotamicus; scope; sea bass; temperature; thermal tolerance
Résumé We investigated whether fatigue from sustained aerobic swimming provides a sub-lethal endpoint to define tolerance of acute warming in fishes, as an alternative to loss of equilibrium (LOE) during a critical thermal maximum (CTmax) protocol. Two species were studied, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Each fish underwent an incremental swim test to determine gait transition speed (U-GT), where it first engaged the unsteady anaerobic swimming mode that preceded fatigue. After suitable recovery, each fish was exercised at 85% of their own U-GT and warmed 1 degrees C every 30 min, to identify the temperature at which they fatigued, denoted as CTswim. Fish were also submitted to a standard CTmax, warming at the same rate as CTswim, under static conditions until LOE. All individuals fatigued in CTswim, at a mean temperature approximately 2 degrees C lower than their CTmax. Therefore, if exposed to acute warming in the wild, the ability to perform aerobic metabolic work would be constrained at temperatures significantly below those that directly threatened survival. The collapse in performance at CTswim was preceded by a gait transition qualitatively indistinguishable from that during the incremental swim test. This suggests that fatigue in CTswim was linked to an inability to meet the tissue oxygen demands of exercise plus warming. This is consistent with the oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis, regarding the mechanism underlying tolerance of warming in fishes. Overall, fatigue at CTswim provides an ecologically relevant sub-lethal threshold that is more sensitive to extreme events than LOE at CTmax.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000541842300012 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2817
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Auteur (up) Cherel, Y.; Romanov, E.; Annasawmy, P.; Thibault, D.; Menard, F.
Titre Micronektonic fish species over three seamounts in the southwestern Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 176 Numéro Pages 104777
Mots-Clés Ceratoscopelus warmingii; community; Diaphus suborbitalis; diet; fauna; Lanternfish; myctophidae; pelagic fishes; pisces; Sigmops elongatus; stomiiformes; Tropical waters
Résumé Taxonomic composition, abundance and biological features of micronektonic fish were investigated using pelagic trawls conducted near and over the summits of three seamounts located in the western Indian Ocean (La Perouse, MAD-Ridge and Walters Shoal). Mesopelagic fish from three families accounted for 80% by number of the total catch (5714 specimens, 121 taxa), namely myctophids (59%), gonostomatids (12%) and sternoptychids (9%). Whereas the gonostomatid Sigmops elongatus was the most abundant species around La Perouse seamount, myctophids were the most diverse and dominant group by number in all three studied areas. Most myctophids were high-oceanic species, which included the numerically dominant Benthosema suborbitale, Ceratoscopelus warmingii, Diaphus perspicillatus, Hygophum hygomii, and Lobianchia dofleini. The few remaining myctophids (Diaphus suborbitalis being the most abundant) were pseudoceanic fish, highlighting the association with landmasses. The study adds one myctophid species new to the Indian Ocean (Diaphus bertelseni), and a second record in the literature of the recently described sternoptychid Argyripnus hulleyi.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000556810400005 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2839
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Auteur (up) Galasso, H.L.; Richard, M.; Lefebvre, S.; Aliaume, C.; Callier, M.D.
Titre Body size and temperature effects on standard metabolic rate for determining metabolic scope for activity of the polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ
Volume 6 Numéro Pages e5675
Mots-Clés adaptation; Aerobic scope; Allometric coefficient; annelida; Annelida; Arrhenius temperature; Deposit-feeder; growth; Growth; muller; nereididae; Oxygen consumption; oxygen-uptake; populations; respiration; salinity; ventilation
Résumé Considering the ecological importance and potential value of Hediste diversicolor, a better understanding of its metabolic rate and potential growth rates is required. The aims of this study are: (i) to describe key biometric relationships; (ii) to test the effects of temperature and body size on standard metabolic rate (as measure by oxygen consumption) to determine critical parameters, namely Arrhenius temperature (T-A), allometric coefficient (b) and reaction rate; and (iii) to determine the metabolic scope for activity (MSA) of H. diversicolor for further comparison with published specific growth rates. Individuals were collected in a Mediterranean lagoon (France). After 10 days of acclimatization, 7 days at a fixed temperature and 24 h of fasting, resting oxygen consumption rates (VO2) were individually measured in the dark at four different temperatures (11, 17, 22 and 27 degrees C) in worms weighing from 4 to 94 mgDW (n = 27 per temperature). Results showed that DW and L3 were the most accurate measurements of weight and length, respectively, among all the metrics tested. Conversion of WW (mg), DW (mg) and L3 (mm) were quantified with the following equations: DW = 0.15 x WW, L3 = 0.025 x TL(mm) + 1.44 and DW = 0.8 x L3(3.68). Using an equation based on temperature and allometric effects, the allometric coefficient (b) was estimated at 0.8 for DW and at 2.83 for L3. The reaction rate (VO2) equaled to 12.33 mu mol gDW(-1) h(-1) and 0.05 mu mol mm L3(-1) h(-)(1) at the reference temperature (20 degrees C, 293.15 K). Arrhenius temperature (T-A) was 5,707 and 5,664 K (for DW and L3, respectively). Metabolic scope for activity ranged from 120.1 to 627.6 J gDW(-1) d(-1). Predicted maximum growth rate increased with temperature, with expected values of 7-10% in the range of 15-20 degrees C. MSA was then used to evaluate specific growth rates (SGR) in several experiments. This paper may be used as a reference and could have interesting applications in the fields of aquaculture, ecology and biogeochemical processes.
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ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2443
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Auteur (up) Jorgensen, C.; Peck, M.A.; Antognarelli, F.; Azzurro, E.; Burrows, M.T.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Cucco, A.; Holt, R.E.; Huebert, K.B.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.; Metcalfe, J.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Sinerchia, M.; Steffensen, J.F.; Teal, L.R.; Domenici, P.
Titre Conservation physiology of marine fishes: advancing the predictive capacity of models Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.
Volume 8 Numéro 6 Pages 900-903
Mots-Clés atlantic cod; body-mass; climate-change; climate effects; conservation physiology; gadus-morhua; metabolic scope; modelling; ocean; species distribution; temperature
Résumé At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity, assessing risks for local populations, or predicting and mitigating the spread of invasive species.
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ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1432
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Auteur (up) Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; Metcalfe, N.B.; McKenzie, D.J.; Domenici, P.
Titre Environmental stressors alter relationships between physiology and behaviour Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends in Ecology & Evolution
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés aerobic scope; environmental change; intraspecific variation; metabolic rate; personality; stress
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ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 576
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