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Auteur (up) Dortel, E.; Pecquerie, L.; Chassot, E.
Titre A Dynamic Energy Budget simulation approach to investigate the eco-physiological factors behind the two-stanza growth of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Model.
Volume 437 Numéro Pages 109297
Mots-Clés Behavioral changes; bioenergetics; bluefin tuna; Body-size scaling; DEB theory; fisheries; indian-ocean; management; Ontogeny; populations; rates; stable-isotopes; temperature; tropical tuna
Résumé The growth of yellowfin tuna has been the subject of considerable research efforts since the early 1960s. Most studies support a complex two-stanza growth pattern with a sharp acceleration departing from the von Bertalanffy growth curve used for most fish populations. This growth pattern has been assumed to result from a combination of physiological, ecological and behavioral factors but the role and contribution of each of them have not been addressed yet. We developed a bioenergetic model for yellowfin tuna in the context of Dynamic Energy Budget theory to mechanistically represent the processes governing yellowfin tuna growth. Most parameters of the model were inferred from Pacific bluefin tuna using body-size scaling relationships while some essential parameters were estimated from biological data sets collected in the Indian Ocean. The model proved particularly suitable for reproducing the data collected during the Pacific yellowfin tuna farming experience conducted by the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission at the Achotines Laboratory in Panama. In addition, model predictions appeared in agreement with knowledge of the biology and ecology of wild yellowfin tuna. We used our model to explore through simulations two major assumptions that might explain the existence of growth stanzas observed in wild yellowfin tuna: (i) a lower food supply during juvenile stage in relation with high infra- and inter-species competition and (ii) ontogenetic changes in food diet. Our results show that both assumptions are plausible although none of them is self-sufficient to explain the intensity of growth acceleration observed in wild Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna, suggesting that the two factors may act in concert. Our study shows that the yellowfin growth pattern is likely due to behavioral changes triggered by the acquisition of physiological abilities and anatomical traits through ontogeny that result in a major change in intensity of schooling and in a shift in the biotic habitat and trophic ecology of this commercially important tuna species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000579484600005 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2891
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Auteur (up) Du, X.; Deng, Y.; Li, S.; Escalas, A.; Feng, K.; He, Q.; Wang, Z.; Wu, Y.; Wang, D.; Peng, X.; Wang, S.
Titre Steeper spatial scaling patterns of subsoil microbiota are shaped by deterministic assembly process Type Article scientifique
Année 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 30 Numéro 4 Pages 1072-1085
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; assembly mechanism; beta-diversity; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; depth; distance decay; drivers; grassland; prokaryote; sequences; soil bacterial communities; spatial scaling; species-area relationship
Résumé Although many studies have investigated the spatial scaling of microbial communities living in surface soils, very little is known about the patterns within deeper strata, nor is the mechanism behind them. Here, we systematically assessed spatial scaling of prokaryotic biodiversity within three different strata (Upper: 0-20 cm, Middle: 20-40 cm, and Substratum: 40-100 cm) in a typical grassland by examining both distance-decay (DDRs) and species-area relationships (SARs), taxonomically and phylogenetically, as well as community assembly processes. Each layer exhibited significant biogeographic patterns in both DDR and SAR (p < .05), with taxonomic turnover rates higher than phylogenetic ones. Specifically, the spatial turnover rates, beta and z values, respectively, ranged from 0.016 +/- 0.005 to 0.023 +/- 0.005 and 0.065 +/- 0.002 to 0.077 +/- 0.004 across soil strata, and both increased with depth. Moreover, the prokaryotic community in grassland soils assembled mainly according to deterministic rather than stochastic mechanisms. By using normalized stochasticity ratio (NST) based on null model, the relative importance of deterministic ratios increased from 48.0 to 63.3% from Upper to Substratum, meanwhile a phylogenetic based method revealed average beta NTI also increased with depth, from -5.29 to 19.5. Using variation partitioning and distance approaches, both geographic distance and soil properties were found to strongly affect biodiversity structure, the proportions increasing with depth, but spatial distance was always the main underlying factor. These indicated increasingly deterministic proportions in accelerating turnover rates for spatial assembly of prokaryotic biodiversity. Our study provided new insights on biogeography in different strata, revealing importance of assembly patterns and mechanisms of prokaryote communities in below-surface soils.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000601909000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2963
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Auteur (up) Du, X.; Deng, Y.; Li, S.; Escalas, A.; Feng, K.; He, Q.; Wang, Z.; Wu, Y.; Wang, D.; Peng, X.; Wang, S.
Titre Steeper spatial scaling patterns of subsoil microbiota are shaped by deterministic assembly process Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; assembly mechanism; beta-diversity; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; depth; distance decay; drivers; grassland; prokaryote; sequences; soil bacterial communities; spatial scaling; species-area relationship
Résumé Although many studies have investigated the spatial scaling of microbial communities living in surface soils, very little is known about the patterns within deeper strata, nor is the mechanism behind them. Here, we systematically assessed spatial scaling of prokaryotic biodiversity within three different strata (Upper: 0-20 cm, Middle: 20-40 cm, and Substratum: 40-100 cm) in a typical grassland by examining both distance-decay (DDRs) and species-area relationships (SARs), taxonomically and phylogenetically, as well as community assembly processes. Each layer exhibited significant biogeographic patterns in both DDR and SAR (p < .05), with taxonomic turnover rates higher than phylogenetic ones. Specifically, the spatial turnover rates, beta and z values, respectively, ranged from 0.016 +/- 0.005 to 0.023 +/- 0.005 and 0.065 +/- 0.002 to 0.077 +/- 0.004 across soil strata, and both increased with depth. Moreover, the prokaryotic community in grassland soils assembled mainly according to deterministic rather than stochastic mechanisms. By using normalized stochasticity ratio (NST) based on null model, the relative importance of deterministic ratios increased from 48.0 to 63.3% from Upper to Substratum, meanwhile a phylogenetic based method revealed average beta NTI also increased with depth, from -5.29 to 19.5. Using variation partitioning and distance approaches, both geographic distance and soil properties were found to strongly affect biodiversity structure, the proportions increasing with depth, but spatial distance was always the main underlying factor. These indicated increasingly deterministic proportions in accelerating turnover rates for spatial assembly of prokaryotic biodiversity. Our study provided new insights on biogeography in different strata, revealing importance of assembly patterns and mechanisms of prokaryote communities in below-surface soils.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000601909000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2931
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Auteur (up) Lefevre, S.; McKenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E.
Titre In modelling effects of global warming, invalid assumptions lead to unrealistic projections Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 553-556
Mots-Clés growth; fish; metabolism; oxygen uptake; climate change; climate-change; modelling; scaling; metabolism-size relationship; carp; warming
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2279
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Auteur (up) Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E.
Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459
Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis
Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
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Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169
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