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Auteur Andrello, M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Parravicini, V.; Scholtens, J.; Verley, P.; Barange, M.; Sumaila, U.R.; Manel, S.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 16039  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; Connectivity; dispersal; fisheries management; impacts; Populations; protected areas; reef fishes; world  
  Résumé Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2162  
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Auteur Bakker, J.; Wangensteen, O.S.; Chapman, D.D.; Boussarie, G.; Buddo, D.; Guttridge, T.L.; Hertler, H.; Mouillot, D.; Vigliola, L.; Mariani, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental DNA reveals tropical shark diversity in contrasting levels of anthropogenic impact Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages 16886  
  Mots-Clés management; ecosystem; conservation; fish communities; rays; populations; collapse; aquatic biodiversity; coral-reef fisheries; wilderness  
  Résumé Sharks are charismatic predators that play a key role in most marine food webs. Their demonstrated vulnerability to exploitation has recently turned them into flagship species in ocean conservation. Yet, the assessment and monitoring of the distribution and abundance of such mobile species in marine environments remain challenging, often invasive and resource-intensive. Here we pilot a novel, rapid and non-invasive environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding approach specifically targeted to infer shark presence, diversity and eDNA read abundance in tropical habitats. We identified at least 21 shark species, from both Caribbean and Pacific Coral Sea water samples, whose geographical patterns of diversity and read abundance coincide with geographical differences in levels of anthropogenic pressure and conservation effort. We demonstrate that eDNA metabarcoding can be effectively employed to study shark diversity. Further developments in this field have the potential to drastically enhance our ability to assess and monitor elusive oceanic predators, and lead to improved conservation strategies.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2244  
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Auteur Barneche, D.R.; Rezende, E.L.; Parravicini, V.; Maire, Eva; Edgar, G.J.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Ferreira, C.E.L.; Friedlander, A.M.; Green, A.L.; Luiz, O.J.; Rodriguez-Zaragoza, F.A.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Floeter, S.R. doi  openurl
  Titre Body size, reef area and temperature predict global reef-fish species richness across spatial scales Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 3 Pages 315-327  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; diversity; patterns; coral-reefs; spatial scale; community assembly; biogeography; extrapolation; local diversity; neutral theory; range size; rarefaction; regional diversity; species energy  
  Résumé Aim To investigate biotic and abiotic correlates of reef-fish species richness across multiple spatial scales. Location Tropical reefs around the globe, including 485 sites in 109 sub-provinces spread across 14 biogeographic provinces. Time period Present. Major taxa studied 2,523 species of reef fish. Methods We compiled a database encompassing 13,050 visual transects. We used hierarchical linear Bayesian models to investigate whether fish body size, reef area, isolation, temperature, and anthropogenic impacts correlate with reef-fish species richness at each spatial scale (i.e., sites, sub-provinces, provinces). Richness was estimated using coverage-based rarefaction. We also tested whether species packing (i.e., transect-level species richness/m(2)) is correlated with province-level richness. Results Body size had the strongest effect on species richness across all three spatial scales. Reef area and temperature were both positively correlated with richness at all spatial scales. At the site scale only, richness decreased with reef isolation. Species richness was not correlated with proxies of human impacts. Species packing was correlated with species richness at the province level following a sub-linear power function. Province-level differences in species richness were also mirrored by patterns of body size distribution at the site scale. Species-rich provinces exhibited heterogeneous assemblages of small-bodied species with small range sizes, whereas species-poor provinces encompassed homogeneous assemblages composed by larger species with greater dispersal capacity. Main conclusions Our findings suggest that body size distribution, reef area and temperature are major predictors of species richness and accumulation across scales, consistent with recent theories linking home range to species-area relationships as well as metabolic effects on speciation rates. Based on our results, we hypothesize that in less diverse areas, species are larger and likely more dispersive, leading to larger range sizes and less turnover between sites. Our results indicate that changes in province-level (i.e., regional) richness should leave a tractable fingerprint in local assemblages, and that detailed studies on local-scale assemblage composition may be informative of responses occurring at larger scales.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2522  
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Auteur Bender, M.G.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Parravicini, V.; Pie, M.R.; Barneche, D.R.; Oliveira-Santos, L.G.R.; Floeter, S.R. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation drives taxonomic and functional nestedness in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages 425-435  
  Mots-Clés assembly rules; biodiversity; communities; coral-reef; diversity; global patterns; islands; null model analysis; species richness; traits  
  Résumé Taxonomic nestedness, the degree to which the taxonomic composition of species-poor assemblages represents a subset of richer sites, commonly occurs in habitat fragments and islands differing in size and isolation from a source pool. However, species are not ecologically equivalent and the extent to which nestedness is observed in terms of functional trait composition of assemblages still remains poorly known. Here, using an extensive database on the functional traits and the distributions of 6316 tropical reef fish species across 169 sites, we assessed the levels of taxonomical vs functional nestedness of reef fish assemblages at the global scale. Functional nestedness was considerably more common than taxonomic nestedness, and generally associated with geographical isolation, where nested subsets are gradually more isolated from surrounding reef areas and from the center of biodiversity. Because a nested pattern in functional composition implies that certain combinations of traits may be represented by few species, we identified these groups of low redundancy that include large herbivore-detritivores and omnivores, small piscivores, and macro-algal herbivores. The identified patterns of nestedness may be an outcome of the interaction between species dispersal capabilities, resource requirements, and gradients of isolation among habitats. The importance of isolation in generating the observed pattern of functional nestedness within biogeographic regions may indicate that disturbance in depauperate and isolated sites can have disproportionate effects on the functional structure of their reef fish assemblages.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2107  
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Auteur Bender, M.G.; Pie, M.R.; Rezende, E.L.; Mouillot, D.; Floeter, S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Biogeographic, historical and environmental influences on the taxonomic and functional structure of Atlantic reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 22 Numéro 11 Pages 1173-1182  
  Mots-Clés Assemblage structuring; Atlantic Ocean; Body size; functional group; reef fish; taxonomic structure  
  Résumé Aim To disentangle how historic, biogeographic and environmental factors have shaped the composition of different reef fish assemblages, we analysed assemblage structure from a taxonomic (proportions of species from different families) and functional perspective (diet and body size). Location Atlantic Ocean. Methods The distributions of 1629 fish species were compiled for 31 locations across the Atlantic Ocean (39°66′ N, 27°50′ S). These locations provide a richness gradient ranging from 54 species in St Paul's Rocks to 474 in Cuba. We used cluster analyses to assess how historical and biogeographic factors have shaped the taxonomic and functional structure (i.e. the distribution of species within families, diet and body size groups) of assemblages. We then employed a constrained analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) to test the relative influence of the distance from the biodiversity centre in the Atlantic, sea surface temperature, isolation, coral species richness and area, and coastal length on the observed patterns of assemblage structure. Results The taxonomic and functional structure of reef fish assemblages across the Atlantic exhibits a biogeographic fingerprint, with a marked discrimination between species-rich biogenic reefs (concentrated primarily in the Caribbean and composed of small species feeding on invertebrates) and poorer peripheral regions dominated by larger species with more diverse diets. The first CAP axis explains 87% of body size distribution in assemblages, showing that the effects of sea surface temperature and coral richness and those of isolation are antagonistic and can be embedded into a single dimension. Environmental factors, such as temperature and habitat complexity, explain the disproportionate number of small species in the Caribbean, whereas in the remaining regions the predominance of large-bodied fish increases with isolation due to high dispersal ability. Main conclusions We found that historical events, which have shaped the biogeography of reef fishes, and environmental characteristics (coral reefs versus periphery) have both played a role in structuring the taxonomic and functional components of Atlantic fish assemblages.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 456  
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