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Auteur (up) Amélineau, F.; Grémillet, D.; Bonnet, D.; Bot, T.L.; Fort, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One  
  Volume 11 Numéro 7 Pages e0157764  
  Mots-Clés Birds; Copepods; Foraging; Predation; Seabirds; Sea ice; Trophic interactions; Zooplankton  
  Résumé The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1592  
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Auteur (up) Chassot, E.; Duplisea, D.; Hammill, M.; Caskenette, A.; Bousquet, N.; Lambert, Y.; Stenson, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Role of predation by harp seals Pagophilus groenlandicus in the collapse and non-recovery of northern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod Gadus morhua Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 379 Numéro Pages 279-297  
  Mots-Clés cod; functional response; harp seal; model; predation; recovery  
  Résumé A statistical catch-at-age model was developed to assess the effects of predation by the northwest Atlantic harp seal population on northern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod by estimating the relative importance of different sources of mortality that affected the stock during a period of collapse and non-recovery. Cod recruitment at age 1 is modeled via a non-linear stock-recruitment relationship based on total egg production and accounts for changes in female length-at-maturity and cod condition. Natural mortality other than seal predation also depends on cod condition used as an integrative index of changes in environmental conditions. The linkage between seals and cod is modeled through a multi-age functional response that was derived from the reconstruction of the seal diet using morphometric relationships and stomach contents of more than 200 seals collected between 1998 and 2001. The model was fitted following a maximum likelihood estimation approach to a scientific survey abundance index (1984 to 2006). Model results show that the collapse of the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod stock was mainly due to the combination of high fishing mortality rates and poor environmental conditions in the early to mid-1990s contributing to the current state of recruitment overfishing. The increase in harp seal abundance during 1984 to 2006 was reflected by an increase in predation mortality for the young cod age-groups targeted by seals. Although current levels of predation mortality affect cod spawning biomass, the lack of recovery of the NGSL cod stock seems mainly due to the very poor recruitment.  
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  Langue Eng Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 15  
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Auteur (up) Chassot, E.; Rouyer, T.; Trenkel, V.M.; Gascuel, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Investigating trophic-level variability in Celtic Sea fish predators Type Article scientifique
  Année 2008 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Fish Biology  
  Volume 73 Numéro 4 Pages 763-781  
  Mots-Clés food web; Gam; Indicator; omnivory; Predation; Trophic level  
  Résumé The trophic level (TL) mean and variance, and the degree of omnivory for five Celtic Sea fish predators were estimated using a database of stomach content records characterized by a high level of taxonomic resolution. The predators occupied a high position in the food web, i.e. 4·75 for Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, 4·44 for haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, 4·88 for European hake Merluccius merluccius, 5·00 for megrim Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis and 5·27 for whiting Merlangius merlangus. The level of taxonomic resolution of the prey did not greatly affect mean TL predator values; an effect on variance was evident, low resolution masking intra-population variability in TL. Generalized additive models (GAM) were used to explain the variability of predator TL caused by environmental variables (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, ICES, division and season) and predator characteristics (total length, LT). Significant year, location season and interaction effects were found for some species and with LT at the scale of ICES subdivision. The species-specific variability of TL could be due to spatio-temporal variations in prey availability and in predator selectivity following ontogenetic changes. Omnivorous fish TL was less affected by spatio-temporal variations. In addition, results showed that the omnivory index and TL variability provide dissimilar information on predator feeding strategy. Combining information on TL variability and omnivory allowed between within-individual and between-individual components contributing to trophic niche width to be separated and the type of generalization of fish predators to be identified.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1095-8649 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1674  
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Auteur (up) David, C.; Vaz, S.; Loots, C.; Antajan, E.; van der Molen, J.; Travers-Trolet, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Understanding winter distribution and transport pathways of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea: coupling habitat and dispersal modelling approaches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Invasions  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 2605-2619  
  Mots-Clés a. agassiz; anchoa-mitchilli; black-sea; caspian sea; fish; Habitat modelling; Jellyfish; Mnemiopsis leidyi; narragansett bay; North Sea; Overwinter refuges; Particle tracking; population connectivity; Predation; rhode-island  
  Résumé The invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been reported in various coastal locations in the southern North Sea in the past years. Since 2009, International Bottom Trawl Surveys have recorded this species each winter in open waters. As this species, well-known for its dramatic disturbance of ecosystems, was expected not to be able to overwinter offshore it is crucial to understand its distribution dynamics. Two modelling methods, a quantile regression and a particle tracking model, were used (1) to identify habitats where the invasive ctenophore M. leidyi could survive the North Sea cold winters and (2) to investigate the dispersal of individuals between these different habitats, emphasizing favorable areas where sustainable populations could have been established. Temperature was found to be the crucial factor controlling the winter distribution of M. leidyi in the North Sea. High abundance predictions in winter were associated with low values of temperature, which characterise south-eastern coastal areas and estuaries influenced by riverine runoff. A retention-based M. leidyi population was indicated along the northern Dutch coast and German Bight and a transport-based population offshore from the western Danish coast. Individuals found in the open waters were transported from southern coasts of the North Sea, thus the open water population densities depend on the flux of offspring from these areas. This study provides the first estimates of the overwinter areas of this invasive species over the cold winters in the North Sea. Based on the agreement of habitat and dispersal model results, we conclude that M. leidyi has become established along south-eastern coasts of the North Sea where the environment conditions allows overwintering and it can be retained for later blooms.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1457  
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Auteur (up) Gueroun, S.K.M.; Molinero, J.C.; Piraino, S.; Daly Yahia, M.N. openurl 
  Titre Population dynamics and predatory impact of the alien jellyfish Aurelia solida (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) in the Bizerte Lagoon (southwestern Mediterranean Sea) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Mediterr. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 1 Pages 22-35  
  Mots-Clés abundance; asexual reproduction rates; aurita cnidaria; common jellyfish; cyanea-capillata; gullmar fjord; mesozooplankton; moon jellyfish; predation; prey selection; prince-william-sound; Scyphomedusae; SW Mediterranean; tokyo bay; zooplankton  
  Résumé Understanding the life cycle strategies and predatory impact of alien jellyfish species is critical to mitigate the impact that these organisms may have on local populations, biodiversity, and ultimately on the functioning of food webs. In the Mediterranean Sea, little is known about the dynamics of alien jellyfish, despite this biodiversity hotspot being one of the most threatened areas by increasing numbers of alien jellyfish. Here, we investigated the population dynamics and predatory impact of a non-indigenous scyphomedusa, Aurelia solida Browne 1905, in the Bizerte Lagoon, Tunisia. The study was based on bimonthly surveys performed over two consecutive years, from November 2012 to August 2014. Field observations showed that the planktonic phase of A. solida occurs from winter to early summer. Prey composition was investigated by means of gut content and field zooplankton analyses. Calanoid copepods, mollusc larvae, and larvaceans represented the main food items of A. solida. To determine the jellyfish feeding rate and their predatory impact on zooplankton populations, the digestion time for zooplankton prey was assessed at three different temperatures: 13, 18, and 23 degrees C in laboratory conditions, corresponding to the average range of temperatures encountered by A. solida in the Bizerte Lagoon. We found that A. solida consumed 0.5-22.5% and 0.02-37.3% of the daily zooplankton standing stock in 2013 and 2014, respectively. These results indicate a non-negligible but restricted seasonal grazing impact on some mesozooplankton groups, explained by the relatively short lifespan of the medusa stage (5-6 months).  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1108-393x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000524248700003 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2773  
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