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Auteur Goetze, J.S.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Langlois, T.J.; Wilson, S.K.; White, C.; Weeks, R.; Jupiter, S.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.  
  Volume 55 Numéro 3 Pages 1102-1113  
  Mots-Clés analytical framework; conservation; coral-reef fishes; customary management; fisheries management; food security; locally managed marine areas; long-term; management; marine protected areas; marine reserve; matter; meta-analysis; metaanalysis; partially protected areas; periodically harvested closures; populations; reserves; small-scale fisheries; video  
  Résumé 1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries-related objectives. 3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested. 4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post-harvest protection benefits. 5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short-term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests. 6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short-term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long-term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.  
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  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2345  
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Auteur Jaspers, C.; Huwer, B.; Antajan, E.; Hosia, A.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Biastoch, A.; Angel, D.; Asmus, R.; Augustin, C.; Bagheri, S.; Beggs, S.E.; Balsby, T.J.S.; Boersma, M.; Bonnet, D.; Christensen, J.T.; Daenhardt, A.; Delpy, F.; Falkenhaug, T.; Finenko, G.; Fleming, N.E.C.; Fuentes, V.; Galil, B.; Gittenberger, A.; Griffin, D.C.; Haslob, H.; Javidpour, J.; Kamburska, L.; Kube, S.; Langenberg, V.T.; Lehtiniemi, M.; Lombard, F.; Malzahn, A.; Marambio, M.; Mihneva, V.; Moller, L.F.; Niermann, U.; Okyar, M.I.; Ozdemir, Z.B.; Pitois, S.; Reusch, T.B.H.; Robbens, J.; Stefanova, K.; Thibault, D.; van der Veer, H.W.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; Wozniczka, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ocean current connectivity propelling the secondary spread of a marine invasive comb jelly across western Eurasia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 7 Pages 814-827  
  Mots-Clés abundance; biodiversity; biological invasions; black-sea; caspian sea; consequences; ctenophore mnemiopsis-leidyi; gelatinous zooplankton; invasion corridors; invasive species; jellyfish; larval transport; marine connectivity; Mnemiopsis leidyi; north-sea; range expansion; source populations; source-sink dynamics; waters; zooplankton  
  Résumé Aim: Invasive species are of increasing global concern. Nevertheless, the mechanisms driving further distribution after the initial establishment of non-native species remain largely unresolved, especially in marine systems. Ocean currents can be a major driver governing range occupancy, but this has not been accounted for in most invasion ecology studies so far. We investigate how well initial establishment areas are interconnected to later occupancy regions to test for the potential role of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics in order to infer invasion corridors and the source-sink dynamics of a non-native holoplanktonic biological probe species on a continental scale. Location: Western Eurasia. Time period: 1980s-2016. Major taxa studied: 'Comb jelly' Mnemiopsis leidyi. Methods: Based on 12,400 geo-referenced occurrence data, we reconstruct the invasion history of M. leidyi in western Eurasia. We model ocean currents and calculate their stability to match the temporal and spatial spread dynamics with large-scale connectivity patterns via ocean currents. Additionally, genetic markers are used to test the predicted connectivity between subpopulations. Results: Ocean currents can explain secondary spread dynamics, matching observed range expansions and the timing of first occurrence of our holoplanktonic non-native biological probe species, leading to invasion corridors in western Eurasia. In northern Europe, regional extinctions after cold winters were followed by rapid recolonizations at a speed of up to 2,000 km per season. Source areas hosting year-round populations in highly interconnected regions can re-seed genotypes over large distances after local extinctions. Main conclusions: Although the release of ballast water from container ships may contribute to the dispersal of non-native species, our results highlight the importance of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics. Highly interconnected areas hosting invasive species are crucial for secondary spread dynamics on a continental scale. Invasion risk assessments should consider large-scale connectivity patterns and the potential source regions of non-native marine species.  
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  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2390  
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur Perry, R.I.; Cury, P.; Brander, K.; Jennings, S.; Mollmann, C.; Planque, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Sensitivity of marine systems to climate and fishing: Concepts, issues and management responses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Marine Systems  
  Volume 79 Numéro Pages 427-435  
  Mots-Clés change; climate; Communities; ecosystems; fisheries; Fishing; management; Populations; variability  
  Résumé Modern fisheries research and management must understand and take account of the interactions between climate and fishing, rather than try to disentangle their effects and address each separately. These interactions are significant drivers of change in exploited marine systems and have ramifications for ecosystems and those who depend on the services they provide. We discuss how fishing and climate forcing interact on individual fish, marine populations, marine communities, and ecosystems to bring these levels into states that are more sensitive to (i.e. more strongly related with) climate forcing. Fishing is unlikely to alter the sensitivities of individual finfish and invertebrates to climate forcing. It will remove individuals with specific characteristics from the gene pool, thereby affecting structure and function at higher levels of organisation. Fishing leads to a loss of older age classes, spatial contraction, loss of sub-units, and alteration of life history traits in populations, making them more sensitive to climate variability at interannual to interdecadal scales. Fishing reduces the mean size of individuals and mean trophic level of communities, decreasing their turnover time leading them to track environmental variability more closely. Marine ecosystems under intense exploitation evolve towards stronger bottom-up control and greater sensitivity to climate forcing. Because climate change occurs slowly, its effects are not likely to have immediate impacts on marine systems but will be manifest as the accumulation of the interactions between fishing and climate variability – unless threshold limits are exceeded. Marine resource managers need to develop approaches which maintain the resilience of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems to the combined and interacting effects of climate and fishing. Overall, a less-heavily fished marine system, and one which shifts the focus from individual species to functional groups and fish communities, is likely to provide more stable catches with climate variability and change than would a heavily fished system. Crown Copyright (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0924-7963 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 95  
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Auteur Van Beveren, E.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Brosset, P.; Saraux, C. doi  openurl
  Titre The fisheries history of small pelagics in the Northern Mediterranean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 73 Numéro 6 Pages 1474-1484  
  Mots-Clés age; anchovy; atlantic; dynamics; fish; fish landings; fluctuations; Gulf of Lions; historical time series; landings; mackerel; multidecadal oscillation; populations; Sardine; variability  
  Résumé Since 2007, the biomass of sardine and anchovy in the NW Mediterranean has remained persistently low, whereas the biomass of the commercially low-valued sprat has exploded. Also, simultaneous decreases in condition, size, and/or age of these populations were observed. Altogether, this resulted in a drop in landings of small pelagics. To understand the amplitude of these events and to provide a baseline scenario against which current changes can be compared, we compiled exceptionally long landing series (1865-2013) of sardine, anchovy, and mackerel for different subregions of the southern French coast. We characterized the fluctuations of these landings and compared these with environmental drivers (sea surface temperature, Rhone river discharge, North Atlantic Oscillation, Western Mediterranean Oscillation-WeMO, and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation-AMO), using different time-series analyses. We also collated historical data to infer qualitative changes in fishing effort over time. A fishing effort related increase in landings was observed around 1962 for all three species, although current sardine landings have dropped below levels observed before this period. Sardine and anchovy landings were, respectively, positively and negatively related to the AMO index and anchovy landings were also positively related to the WeMO. We finished by discussing the potential role of the environmental variables and fishing on long-term fishery landings trends.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1652  
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