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Auteur Perry, R.I.; Cury, P.; Brander, K.; Jennings, S.; Mollmann, C.; Planque, B. url  doi
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  Titre Sensitivity of marine systems to climate and fishing: Concepts, issues and management responses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Marine Systems  
  Volume 79 Numéro (up) Pages 427-435  
  Mots-Clés change; climate; Communities; ecosystems; fisheries; Fishing; management; Populations; variability  
  Résumé Modern fisheries research and management must understand and take account of the interactions between climate and fishing, rather than try to disentangle their effects and address each separately. These interactions are significant drivers of change in exploited marine systems and have ramifications for ecosystems and those who depend on the services they provide. We discuss how fishing and climate forcing interact on individual fish, marine populations, marine communities, and ecosystems to bring these levels into states that are more sensitive to (i.e. more strongly related with) climate forcing. Fishing is unlikely to alter the sensitivities of individual finfish and invertebrates to climate forcing. It will remove individuals with specific characteristics from the gene pool, thereby affecting structure and function at higher levels of organisation. Fishing leads to a loss of older age classes, spatial contraction, loss of sub-units, and alteration of life history traits in populations, making them more sensitive to climate variability at interannual to interdecadal scales. Fishing reduces the mean size of individuals and mean trophic level of communities, decreasing their turnover time leading them to track environmental variability more closely. Marine ecosystems under intense exploitation evolve towards stronger bottom-up control and greater sensitivity to climate forcing. Because climate change occurs slowly, its effects are not likely to have immediate impacts on marine systems but will be manifest as the accumulation of the interactions between fishing and climate variability – unless threshold limits are exceeded. Marine resource managers need to develop approaches which maintain the resilience of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems to the combined and interacting effects of climate and fishing. Overall, a less-heavily fished marine system, and one which shifts the focus from individual species to functional groups and fish communities, is likely to provide more stable catches with climate variability and change than would a heavily fished system. Crown Copyright (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0924-7963 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 95  
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Auteur Galasso, H.L.; Richard, M.; Lefebvre, S.; Aliaume, C.; Callier, M.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Body size and temperature effects on standard metabolic rate for determining metabolic scope for activity of the polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ  
  Volume 6 Numéro (up) Pages e5675  
  Mots-Clés adaptation; Aerobic scope; Allometric coefficient; annelida; Annelida; Arrhenius temperature; Deposit-feeder; growth; Growth; muller; nereididae; Oxygen consumption; oxygen-uptake; populations; respiration; salinity; ventilation  
  Résumé Considering the ecological importance and potential value of Hediste diversicolor, a better understanding of its metabolic rate and potential growth rates is required. The aims of this study are: (i) to describe key biometric relationships; (ii) to test the effects of temperature and body size on standard metabolic rate (as measure by oxygen consumption) to determine critical parameters, namely Arrhenius temperature (T-A), allometric coefficient (b) and reaction rate; and (iii) to determine the metabolic scope for activity (MSA) of H. diversicolor for further comparison with published specific growth rates. Individuals were collected in a Mediterranean lagoon (France). After 10 days of acclimatization, 7 days at a fixed temperature and 24 h of fasting, resting oxygen consumption rates (VO2) were individually measured in the dark at four different temperatures (11, 17, 22 and 27 degrees C) in worms weighing from 4 to 94 mgDW (n = 27 per temperature). Results showed that DW and L3 were the most accurate measurements of weight and length, respectively, among all the metrics tested. Conversion of WW (mg), DW (mg) and L3 (mm) were quantified with the following equations: DW = 0.15 x WW, L3 = 0.025 x TL(mm) + 1.44 and DW = 0.8 x L3(3.68). Using an equation based on temperature and allometric effects, the allometric coefficient (b) was estimated at 0.8 for DW and at 2.83 for L3. The reaction rate (VO2) equaled to 12.33 mu mol gDW(-1) h(-1) and 0.05 mu mol mm L3(-1) h(-)(1) at the reference temperature (20 degrees C, 293.15 K). Arrhenius temperature (T-A) was 5,707 and 5,664 K (for DW and L3, respectively). Metabolic scope for activity ranged from 120.1 to 627.6 J gDW(-1) d(-1). Predicted maximum growth rate increased with temperature, with expected values of 7-10% in the range of 15-20 degrees C. MSA was then used to evaluate specific growth rates (SGR) in several experiments. This paper may be used as a reference and could have interesting applications in the fields of aquaculture, ecology and biogeochemical processes.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2443  
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Auteur Bakker, J.; Wangensteen, O.S.; Chapman, D.D.; Boussarie, G.; Buddo, D.; Guttridge, T.L.; Hertler, H.; Mouillot, D.; Vigliola, L.; Mariani, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental DNA reveals tropical shark diversity in contrasting levels of anthropogenic impact Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Numéro (up) Pages 16886  
  Mots-Clés management; ecosystem; conservation; fish communities; rays; populations; collapse; aquatic biodiversity; coral-reef fisheries; wilderness  
  Résumé Sharks are charismatic predators that play a key role in most marine food webs. Their demonstrated vulnerability to exploitation has recently turned them into flagship species in ocean conservation. Yet, the assessment and monitoring of the distribution and abundance of such mobile species in marine environments remain challenging, often invasive and resource-intensive. Here we pilot a novel, rapid and non-invasive environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding approach specifically targeted to infer shark presence, diversity and eDNA read abundance in tropical habitats. We identified at least 21 shark species, from both Caribbean and Pacific Coral Sea water samples, whose geographical patterns of diversity and read abundance coincide with geographical differences in levels of anthropogenic pressure and conservation effort. We demonstrate that eDNA metabarcoding can be effectively employed to study shark diversity. Further developments in this field have the potential to drastically enhance our ability to assess and monitor elusive oceanic predators, and lead to improved conservation strategies.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2244  
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Auteur Ba, K.; Thiaw, M.; Fall, M.; Thiam, N.; Meissa, B.; Jouffre, D.; Thiaw, O.T.; Gascuel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Long-term fishing impact on the Senegalese coastal demersal resources: diagnosing from stock assessment models Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 31 Numéro (up) Pages 8  
  Mots-Clés west-africa; dynamics; management; West Africa; fisheries; overexploitation; marine ecosystems; populations; mauritania; lessons; Bayesian approach; Coastal demersal species; delta-GLM models; epinephelus-aeneus; experience; surplus production models  
  Résumé For the first time in Senegal, assessments based on both stochastic and deterministic production models were used to draw a global diagnosis of the fishing impact on coastal demersal stocks. Based one national fisheries databases and scientific trawl surveys data: (i) trends in landings since 1971 were examined, (ii) abundance indices of 10 stocks were estimated using linear models fitted to surveys data and commercial catch per unit efforts, and (iii) stock assessments were carried out using pseudo-equilibrium Fox and Pella-Tomlinson models and a Biomass dynamic production model fitted in a Bayesian framework to abundance indices. Most stocks have seen their abundance sharply declining over time. All stocks combined, results of stock assessments suggest a 63% reduction compared to virgin state. Three fifth of demersal stocks are overexploited and excess in fishing effort was estimated until 75% for the worst case. We conclude by suggesting that the fishing of such species must be regulated and an ecosystem approach to fisheries management should be implemented in order to monitor the whole ecosystem.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2278  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. doi  openurl
  Titre Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 610 Numéro (up) Pages 51-63  
  Mots-Clés biomass; Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; competition; Density dependence; dynamics; ecosystem; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; flats; populations; seagrass; Seagrass; sediment; site; Soft-sediment habitat; variability  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2593  
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