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Auteur Manel, S.; Loiseau, N.; Andrello, M.; Fietz, K.; Goni, R.; Forcada, A.; Lenfant, P.; Kininmonth, S.; Marcos, C.; Marques, V.; Mallol, S.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Breusing, C.; Puebla, O.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Long-Distance Benefits of Marine Reserves: Myth or Reality? Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends Ecol. Evol.
Volume 34 Numéro 4 Pages 342-354
Mots-Clés conservation; fish populations; floating objects; gene flow; large-scale; larval dispersal; population connectivity; protected areas; recruitment; spillover
Résumé Long-distance (>40-km) dispersal from marine reserves is poorly documented; yet, it can provide essential benefits such as seeding fished areas or connecting marine reserves into networks. From a meta-analysis, we suggest that the spatial scale of marine connectivity is underestimated due to the limited geographic extent of sampling designs. We also found that the largest marine reserves (>1000 km(2)) are the most isolated. These findings have important implications for the assessment of evolutionary, ecological, and socio-economic long-distance benefits of marine reserves. We conclude that existing methods to infer dispersal should consider the up-to-date genomic advances and also expand the spatial scale of sampling designs. Incorporating long-distance connectivity in conservation planning will contribute to increase the benefits of marine reserve networks.
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ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2545
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Auteur Perry, R.I.; Cury, P.; Brander, K.; Jennings, S.; Mollmann, C.; Planque, B.
Titre Sensitivity of marine systems to climate and fishing: Concepts, issues and management responses Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Marine Systems
Volume 79 Numéro Pages 427-435
Mots-Clés change; climate; Communities; ecosystems; fisheries; Fishing; management; Populations; variability
Résumé Modern fisheries research and management must understand and take account of the interactions between climate and fishing, rather than try to disentangle their effects and address each separately. These interactions are significant drivers of change in exploited marine systems and have ramifications for ecosystems and those who depend on the services they provide. We discuss how fishing and climate forcing interact on individual fish, marine populations, marine communities, and ecosystems to bring these levels into states that are more sensitive to (i.e. more strongly related with) climate forcing. Fishing is unlikely to alter the sensitivities of individual finfish and invertebrates to climate forcing. It will remove individuals with specific characteristics from the gene pool, thereby affecting structure and function at higher levels of organisation. Fishing leads to a loss of older age classes, spatial contraction, loss of sub-units, and alteration of life history traits in populations, making them more sensitive to climate variability at interannual to interdecadal scales. Fishing reduces the mean size of individuals and mean trophic level of communities, decreasing their turnover time leading them to track environmental variability more closely. Marine ecosystems under intense exploitation evolve towards stronger bottom-up control and greater sensitivity to climate forcing. Because climate change occurs slowly, its effects are not likely to have immediate impacts on marine systems but will be manifest as the accumulation of the interactions between fishing and climate variability – unless threshold limits are exceeded. Marine resource managers need to develop approaches which maintain the resilience of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems to the combined and interacting effects of climate and fishing. Overall, a less-heavily fished marine system, and one which shifts the focus from individual species to functional groups and fish communities, is likely to provide more stable catches with climate variability and change than would a heavily fished system. Crown Copyright (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0924-7963 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 95
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Auteur Riou, V.; Ndiaye, A.; Budzinski, H.; Dugue, R.; Le Menach, K.; Combes, Y.; Bossus, M.; Durand, J.D.; Charmantier, G.; Lorin-Nebel, C.
Titre Impact of environmental DDT concentrations on gill adaptation to increased salinity in the tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Comp. Biochem. Physiol. C-Toxicol. Pharmacol.
Volume 156 Numéro 1 Pages 7-16
Mots-Clés DDTs; Na+/K+-ATPase; Osmoregulation; Rainbow trout; Teleost; cell responses; crucian carp; fish; gill; goldfish carassius-auratus; na-k-atpase; natural-populations; polychlorinated-biphenyls; salmo-gairdneri; water
Résumé Estuaries of tropical developing countries suffering from severe droughts induced by climate change are habitats to fish, which face drastic salinity variations and the contact with pollutants. The Western Africa tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron is highly resistant to hypersalinity, but the effect of human-released xenobiotics on its adaptation is barely known. Controlled experiments were conducted to observe S. melanotheron gill adaptation to abrupt salinity variations in the presence of waterborne DDT, at concentrations detected in their natural habitat. The gills appeared as an important site of DDT conversion to DDD and/or depuration. A 12-days DDT exposure resulted in decreased gill epithelium thickness at all salinities (from fresh- to hypersaline-water), and the structure of gills from freshwater fish was particularly altered, relative to controls. No unbalance in tilapia blood osmolality was observed following DDT exposure, which however caused a decrease in branchial Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) activity. Gill cellular NKA expression was reduced in salt-water, together with the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in hypersaline water. Although S. melanotheron seems very resistant (especially in seawater) to short-term waterborne DDT contamination, the resulting alterations of the gill tissue, cells and enzymes might affect longer term respiration, toxicant depuration and/or osmoregulation in highly fluctuating salinities. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 1532-0456 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 649
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Sadykov, A.; Ohlberger, J.; Stenseth, N.C.
Titre Does increasing mortality change the response of fish populations to environmental fluctuations? Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 15 Numéro 7 Pages 658-665
Mots-Clés Age-structured populations; climate-fishing interaction; demographic change; exploited fish stocks; frequency response; response to the environment
Résumé Ecology Letters (2012) 15: 658–665 Abstract

Fluctuations of fish populations abundances are shaped by the interplay between population dynamics and the stochastic forcing of the environment. Age-structured populations behave as a filter of the environment. This filter is characterised by the species-specific life cycle and life-history traits. An increased mortality of mature individuals alters these characteristics and may therefore induce changes in the variability of populations. The response of a generic age-structured model was analysed to investigate the expected changes in the fluctuations of fish populations in response to decreased adult survival. These expectations were then tested on an extensive dataset. In accordance with theory, the analyses revealed that decreased adult survival and mean age of spawners were linked to an increase in the relative importance of short-term fluctuations. It suggests that intensive exploitation can lead to a change in the variability of fish populations, an issue of central interest from both conservation and management perspectives.
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ISSN 1461-0248 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1666
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Auteur Valladares, F.; Matesanz, S.; Guilhaumon, F.; Araujo, M.B.; Balaguer, L.; Benito-Garzon, M.; Cornwell, W.; Gianoli, E.; van Kleunen, M.; Naya, D.E.; Nicotra, A.B.; Poorter, H.; Zavala, M.A.
Titre The effects of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation on forecasts of species range shifts under climate change Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 11 Pages 1351-1364
Mots-Clés change impacts; climate change; climate variability hypothesis; ecological niche models; edge populations; environments; evolution; genetic differentiation; global change; intraspecific variation; local adaptation; niche; phenotypic plasticity; population differentiation; quercus-coccifera; reaction norms; thermal tolerance; tree populations
Résumé Species are the unit of analysis in many global change and conservation biology studies; however, species are not uniform entities but are composed of different, sometimes locally adapted, populations differing in plasticity. We examined how intraspecific variation in thermal niches and phenotypic plasticity will affect species distributions in a warming climate. We first developed a conceptual model linking plasticity and niche breadth, providing five alternative intraspecific scenarios that are consistent with existing literature. Secondly, we used ecological niche-modeling techniques to quantify the impact of each intraspecific scenario on the distribution of a virtual species across a geographically realistic setting. Finally, we performed an analogous modeling exercise using real data on the climatic niches of different tree provenances. We show that when population differentiation is accounted for and dispersal is restricted, forecasts of species range shifts under climate change are even more pessimistic than those using the conventional assumption of homogeneously high plasticity across a species' range. Suitable population-level data are not available for most species so identifying general patterns of population differentiation could fill this gap. However, the literature review revealed contrasting patterns among species, urging greater levels of integration among empirical, modeling and theoretical research on intraspecific phenotypic variation.
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Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AT8YX<br/>Times Cited: 4<br/>Cited Reference Count: 80<br/>Valladares, Fernando Matesanz, Silvia Guilhaumon, Francois Araujo, Miguel B. Balaguer, Luis Benito-Garzon, Marta Cornwell, Will Gianoli, Ernesto van Kleunen, Mark Naya, Daniel E. Nicotra, Adrienne B. Poorter, Hendrik Zavala, Miguel A.<br/>Spanish Ministry for Innovation and Science with the grant Consolider Montes [CSD2008 00040]; Community of Madrid grant REMEDINAL 2 [CM S2009 AMB 1783]; CYTED network ECONS [410RT0406]; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [1/SAE-SCTN/ALENT-07-0224-FEDER-001755, CGL2011-26852]<br/>This work was supported by the Spanish Ministry for Innovation and Science with the grant Consolider Montes [CSD2008 00040], the Community of Madrid grant REMEDINAL 2 [CM S2009 AMB 1783], and CYTED network ECONS (410RT0406). The Pinus sylvestris provenance tests used in this research are part of the Spanish Network of Genetic Trials (GENFORED). We thank all those involved in the establishment, maintenance and measurement of the trials. MBA also thanks the Portuguese IC&DT Call No 1/SAE-SCTN/ALENT-07-0224-FEDER-001755 and CGL2011-26852 project of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness for support of his research.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1176
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