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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Benestan, L.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Combining six genome scan methods to detect candidate genes to salinity in the Mediterranean striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée BMC Genomics  
  Volume 19 Numéro Pages 217  
  Mots-Clés Adaptive genomics; Candidate genes; climate; genetics; Genome scan; landscape genomics; local adaptation; Mediterranean Sea; methionine sulfoxide reductase; Mullus surmuletus; population genomics; principal component analysis; r package; Salinity; selection; threespine sticklebacks  
  Résumé Background: Adaptive genomics may help predicting how a species will respond to future environmental changes. Genomic signatures of local adaptation in marine organisms are often driven by environmental selective agents impacting the physiology of organisms. With one of the highest salinity level, the Mediterranean Sea provides an excellent model to investigate adaptive genomic divergence underlying salinity adaptation. In the present study, we combined six genome scan methods to detect potential genomic signal of selection in the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) populations distributed across a wide salinity gradient. We then blasted these outlier sequences on published fish genomic resources in order to identify relevant potential candidate genes for salinity adaptation in this species. Results: Altogether, the six genome scan methods found 173 outliers out of 1153 SNPs. Using a blast approach, we discovered four candidate SNPs belonging to three genes potentially implicated in adaptation of M. surmuletus to salinity. The allele frequency at one of these SNPs significantly increases with salinity independently from the effect of longitude. The gene associated to this SNP, SOCS2, encodes for an inhibitor of cytokine and has previously been shown to be expressed under osmotic pressure in other marine organisms. Additionally, our results showed that genome scan methods not correcting for spatial structure can still be an efficient strategy to detect potential footprints of selection, when the spatial and environmental variation are confounded, and then, correcting for spatial structure in a second step represents a conservative method. Conclusion: The present outcomes bring evidences of potential genomic footprint of selection, which suggest an adaptive response of M. surmuletus to salinity conditions in the Mediterranean Sea. Additional genomic data such as sequencing of a full-genome and transcriptome analyses of gene expression would provide new insights regarding the possibility that some striped red mullet populations are locally adapted to their saline environment.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2164 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2324  
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Auteur (up) GAGNAIRE, P.-A.; BROQUET, T.; AURELLE, D.; VIARD, F.; SOUISSI, A.; BONHOMME, F.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Bierne, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Using neutral, selected, and hitchhiker loci to assess connectivity of marine populations in the genomic era Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolutionary Applications  
  Volume 8 Numéro 8 Pages 769-786  
  Mots-Clés connectivity; gene flow; marine conservation; population genomics; Population structure  
  Résumé Estimating the rate of exchange of individuals among populations is a central concern to evolutionary ecology and its applications to conservation and management. For instance, the efficiency of protected areas in sustaining locally endangered populations and ecosystems depends on reserve network connectivity. The population genetics theory offers a powerful framework for estimating dispersal distances and migration rates from molecular data. In the marine realm, however, decades of molecular studies have met limited success in inferring genetic connectivity, due to the frequent lack of spatial genetic structure in species exhibiting high fecundity and dispersal capabilities. This is especially true within biogeographic regions bounded by well-known hotspots of genetic differentiation. Here, we provide an overview of the current methods for estimating genetic connectivity using molecular markers and propose several directions for improving existing approaches using large population genomic datasets. We highlight several issues that limit the effectiveness of methods based on neutral markers when there is virtually no genetic differentiation among samples. We then focus on alternative methods based on markers influenced by selection. Although some of these methodologies are still underexplored, our aim was to stimulate new research to test how broadly they are applicable to nonmodel marine species. We argue that the increased ability to apply the concepts of cline analyses will improve dispersal inferences across physical and ecological barriers that reduce connectivity locally. We finally present how neutral markers hitchhiking with selected loci can also provide information about connectivity patterns within apparently well-mixed biogeographic regions. We contend that one of the most promising applications of population genomics is the use of outlier loci to delineate relevant conservation units and related eco-geographic features across which connectivity can be measured.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1434  
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Auteur (up) Pecoraro, C.; Babbucci, M.; Villamor, A.; Franch, R.; Papetti, C.; Leroy, B.; Ortega-Garcia, S.; Muir, J.; Rooker, J.; Arocha, F.; Murua, H.; Zudaire, I.; Chassot, E.; Bodin, N.; Tinti, F.; Bargelloni, L.; Cariani, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Methodological assessment of 2b-RAD genotyping technique for population structure inferences in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Genomics  
  Volume 25 Numéro Pages 43-48  
  Mots-Clés Marine fish; Population genomics; RAD sequencing; Snp; Tropical tuna; Tuna fishery  
  Résumé Global population genetic structure of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is still poorly understood despite its relevance for the tuna fishery industry. Low levels of genetic differentiation among oceans speak in favour of the existence of a single panmictic population worldwide of this highly migratory fish. However, recent studies indicated genetic structuring at a much smaller geographic scales than previously considered, pointing out that YFT population genetic structure has not been properly assessed so far. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, the utility of 2b-RAD genotyping technique for investigating population genetic diversity and differentiation in high gene-flow species. Running de novo pipeline in Stacks, a total of 6772 high-quality genome-wide SNPs were identified across Atlantic, Indian and Pacific population samples representing all major distribution areas. Preliminary analyses showed shallow but significant population structure among oceans (FST = 0.0273; P-value < 0.01). Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components endorsed the presence of genetically discrete yellowfin tuna populations among three oceanic pools. Although such evidence needs to be corroborated by increasing sample size, these results showed the efficiency of this genotyping technique in assessing genetic divergence in a marine fish with high dispersal potential.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1874-7787 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1539  
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