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Auteur Albouy, C.; Delattre, V.L.; Mérigot, B.; Meynard, C.N.; Leprieur, F.
Titre Multifaceted biodiversity hotspots of marine mammals for conservation priorities Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity Distrib
Volume 23 Numéro 6 Pages 615-626
Mots-Clés conservation; Functional diversity; marine mammals; phylogenetic diversity
Résumé Aim Identifying the multifaceted biodiversity hotspots for marine mammals and their spatial overlap with human threats at the global scale. Location World-wide. Methods We compiled a functional trait database for 121 species of marine mammals characterized by 14 functional traits grouped into five categories. We estimated marine mammal species richness (SR) as well as functional (FD) and phylogenetic diversity (PD) per grid cell (1° × 1°) using the FRic index (a measure of trait diversity as the volume of functional space occupied by the species present in an assemblage) and the PD index (the amount of evolutionary history represented by a set of species), respectively. Finally, we assessed the spatial congruence of these three facets of biodiversity hotspots (defined as 2.5% and 5% of the highest values of SR, FD and PD) with human threats at the global scale. Results We showed that the FRic index was weakly correlated with both SR and the PD index. Specifically, SR and FRic displayed a triangular relationship, that is, increasing variability in FRic along the species richness gradient. We also observed a striking lack of spatial congruence (<0.1%) between current human threats and the distribution of the multiple facets of biodiversity hotspots. Main Conclusions We highlighted that functional diversity calculated using the FRic index is weakly associated with the species richness of marine mammals world-wide. This is one of the most endangered vertebrate groups playing a key ecological role in marine ecosystems. This finding calls for caution when using only species richness as a benchmark for defining marine mammal biodiversity hotspots. The very low level of spatial congruence between hotspots of current threats and those of the multiple facets of marine mammal biodiversity suggests that current biodiversity patterns for this group have already been greatly affected by their history of exploitation.
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ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2125
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Auteur Albouy, C.; Lasram, F.B.R.; Velez, L.; Guilhaumon, F.; Meynard, C.N.; Boyer, S.; Benestan, L.; Mouquet, N.; Douzery, E.; Aznar, R.; Troussellier, M.; Somot, S.; Leprieur, F.; Le Loc'h, F.; Mouillot, D.
Titre FishMed: traits, phylogeny, current and projected species distribution of Mediterranean fishes, and environmental data Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology
Volume 96 Numéro 8 Pages 2312-2313
Mots-Clés climate change; coastal fishes; functional diversity; Mediterranean fish species; Mediterranean Sea; Nemomed8; phylogenetic diversity; species distribution models; taxonomic diversity
Résumé The FishMed database provides traits, phylogeny, current and projected species distribution of Mediterranean fishes, and associated sea surface temperature (SST) from the regional oceanic model NEMOMED8. Data for the current geographical distributions of 635 Mediterranean fish species were compiled from a published expert knowledge atlas of fishes of the northern Atlantic and the Mediterranean (FNAM) edited between 1984 and 1986 and from an updated exotic fish species list. Two future sets of projected species distributions were obtained for the middle and end of the 21st century by using an ensemble forecasting approach for 288 coastal Mediterranean fish species based on SST according to the IPPC/SRES A2 scenario implemented with the Mediterranean climatic model NEMOMED8. The functional part of the database encompasses 12 biological and ecological traits (maximal and common lengths, vertical distribution, habitat, migration type, mode of reproduction, sex shift, semelparity, diet type (larvae and adults), social behavior, species origin, and depth) for the 635 fish species. To build the phylogeny we inferred the timing and geographic origins of Mediterranean teleost species diversity using nucleotide sequences collected from GenBank including 62% of Mediterranean teleost species plus nine outgroups. Maximum likelihood Bayesian phylogenetic and dating analyses were calibrated using 20 fossil species. An additional 124 fish species were grafted onto the chronogram according to their taxonomic affinity to obtain a phylogenetic tree including 498 species. Finally we also present the associated SST data for the observed period (1961–1980) and for the middle (2040–2059) and the end of the 21st century (2080–2099) obtained from NEMOMED8 according to the IPCC A2 scenario. The FishMed database might be of interest in the context of global anthropogenic changes as coastal Mediterranean ecosystems are currently recognized as one of the most impacted ecosystems on earth.
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ISSN 1939-9170 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1471
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Auteur Anderson, P.S.L.; Claverie, T.; Patek, S.N.
Titre Levers And Linkages: Mechanical Trade-Offs In A Power-Amplified System Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolution
Volume 68 Numéro 7 Pages 1919-1933
Mots-Clés amplification; Biomechanics; comparative methods; evolution; kinematic transmission; labrid fishes; mantis shrimp; modularity; morphology; phylogenetic; stomatopods; strike; trade-offs
Résumé Mechanical redundancy within a biomechanical system (e. g., many-to-one mapping) allows morphologically divergent organisms to maintain equivalent mechanical outputs. However, most organisms depend on the integration of more than one biomechanical system. Here, we test whether coupled mechanical systems follow a pattern of amplification (mechanical changes are congruent and evolve toward the same functional extreme) or independence (mechanisms evolve independently). We examined the correlated evolution and evolutionary pathways of the coupled four-bar linkage and lever systems in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) ultrafast raptorial appendages. We examined models of character evolution in the framework of two divergent groups of stomatopods-“smashers” (hammer-shaped appendages) and “spearers” (bladed appendages). Smashers tended to evolve toward force amplification, whereas spearers evolved toward displacement amplification. These findings show that coupled biomechanical systems can evolve synergistically, thereby resulting in functional amplification rather than mechanical redundancy.
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ISSN 0014-3820 ISBN Médium
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Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AL3TK<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 40<br/>Anderson, Philip S. L. Claverie, Thomas Patek, S. N.<br/>National Science Foundation [IOS-1149748]<br/>The authors would like to thank S. Price for extensive assistance on phylogenetic comparative methods and L. Revell for help and advice for using his Phytools package for R. We would also like to thank M. Porter, M. Rosario, P. Green, S. Cox, and K. Kagaya for helpful discussions on stomatopod biology as well as two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments, which have greatly improved the quality of this article. We also thank K. Reed (National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC) and S. Keable (Australian Museum of Natural History, Sydney) for access to their specimen collections. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (IOS-1149748) to SNP. The authors declare no conflict of interest.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1156
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Auteur Canard, E.F.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Stanko, M.; Miklisova, D.; Gravel, D.
Titre Empirical Evaluation of Neutral Interactions in Host-Parasite Networks Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée American Naturalist
Volume 183 Numéro 4 Pages 468-479
Mots-Clés abundance; animal mutualistic networks; community; dissimilarity; effort; food-web structure; geographical variation; host-parasite network; network structure; neutrality; null model; phylogenetic signal; reconciling niche; sampling; scale-dependence; species abundance distribution
Résumé While niche-based processes have been invoked extensively to explain the structure of interaction networks, recent studies propose that neutrality could also be of great importance. Under the neutral hypothesis, network structure would simply emerge from random encounters between individuals and thus would be directly linked to species abundance. We investigated the impact of species abundance distributions on qualitative and quantitative metrics of 113 host-parasite networks. We analyzed the concordance between neutral expectations and empirical observations at interaction, species, and network levels. We found that species abundance accurately predicts network metrics at all levels. Despite host-parasite systems being constrained by physiology and immunology, our results suggest that neutrality could also explain, at least partially, their structure. We hypothesize that trait matching would determine potential interactions between species, while abundance would determine their realization.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 573
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Auteur Caro, A.; Escalas, A.; Bouvier, C.; Grousset, E.; Lautredou-Audouy, N.; Roques, C.; Charmantier, M.; Gros, O.
Titre Epibiotic bacterial community of Sphaeroma serratum (Crustacea, Isopoda): relationship with molt status Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 457 Numéro Pages 11-27
Mots-Clés 16s ribosomal-rna; Crustacean; DGGE band pattern; Epibiotic biofilm; Molt cycle; Sphaeroma; fish; gastropod; gradient gel-electrophoresis; hydrothermal-vent; in-situ hybridization; mid-atlantic ridge; oxidizing bacteria; phylogenetic diversity; riftia-pachyptila; shrimp rimicaris-exoculata; urothoe-poseidonis
Résumé Sphaeroma serratum is a marine isopod species that inhabits seashores from Europe to West Africa. The individuals live under stones in direct contact with reduced sediments and harbour a diverse bacterial community on the cuticle of their pleopods. We investigated the diversity of these epibiotic bacteria on male (pubescent and senescent) and female specimens with electron microscopic observations and molecular tools. The microbial community of S. serratum was shown to be composed of at least 5 bacterial morphotypes observed on the pleopodal cuticle in all male specimens. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we identified 5 major phylogenetic groups (alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-Proteobacteria and Archaea) whereas denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments of epibiotic bacteria revealed 50 bands. The bacterial community associated with S. serratum seems more diverse than in other marine crustaceans, such as Rimicaris. The relative diversity of this bacterial community was also studied in relation to the molt cycle. The comparison of DGGE band patterns of several individuals from female, pubescent male and senescent male groups revealed that the bacterial community diversity was dependent on the sex and the age of the individuals and more generally on the molt status.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 564
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