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Auteur Blasco, F.R.; McKenzie, D.J.; Taylor, E.W.; Rantin, F.T.
Titre The role of the autonomic nervous system in control of cardiac and air-breathing responses to sustained aerobic exercise in the African sharptooth catfish Clarias gariepinus Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Comp. Biochem. Physiol. A-Mol. Integr. Physiol.
Volume 203 Numéro Pages 273-280
Mots-Clés Adrenergic tone; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; cardiorespiratory interactions; Cholinergic tone; Fishes; Heart rate; heart-rate; hoplerythrinus-unitaeniatus; Hypoxia; oxygen-tensions; rainbow-trout; salmo-gairdneri; Swimming; synbranchus-marmoratus
Résumé Clarias gariepinus is a facultative air-breathing catfish that exhibits changes in heart rate (f(H)) associated with air breaths (AB). A transient bradycardia prior to the AB is followed by sustained tachycardia during breath-hold. This study evaluated air-breathing and cardiac responses to sustained aerobic exercise in juveniles (total length similar to 20 cm), and how exercise influenced variations in f(H) associated with AB. In particular, it investigated the role of adrenergic and cholinergic control in cardiac responses, and effects of pharmacological abolition of this control on air-breathing responses. Sustained exercise at 15, 30 and 45 cm s(-1) in a swim tunnel caused significant increases in f(AB) and f(H), from approximately 5 breaths h(-1) and 60 heartbeats min(-1) at the lowest speed, to over 60 breaths h(-1) and 100 beats min(-1) at the highest, respectively. There was a progressive decline in the degree of variation in f(H), around each AB, as f(AB) increased with exercise intensity. Total autonomic blockade abolished all variation in fH during exercise, and around each AB, but f(AB) responses were the same as in untreated animals. Cardiac responses were exclusively due to modulation of inhibitory cholinergic tone, which varied from >100% at the lowest speed to <10% at the highest. Cholinergic blockade had no effect on f(AB) compared to untreated fish. Excitatory beta-adrenergic tone was approximately 20% and did not vary with swimming speed, but its blockade increased f(AB) at all speeds, compared to untreated animals. This reveals complex effects of autonomic control on air-breathing during exercise in C. gariepinus, which deserve further investigation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1714
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Auteur McKenzie, D.J.; Steffensen, J.F.; Taylor, E.W.; Abe, A.S.
Titre The contribution of air breathing to aerobic scope and exercise performance in the banded knifefish Gymnotus carapo L Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Exp. Biol.
Volume 215 Numéro 8 Pages 1323-1330
Mots-Clés Hypoxia; amia-calva; aquatic hypoxia; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; cardiac-performance; critical swimming speed; european sea-bass; megalops-cyprinoides; metabolic rate; oxygen uptake; oxygen-tensions; rainbow-trout; respiratory mode; respirometry; swimming performance
Résumé The contribution of air breathing to aerobic metabolic scope and exercise performance was investigated in a teleost with bimodal respiration, the banded knifefish, submitted to a critical swimming speed (U-crit) protocol at 30 degrees C. Seven individuals (mean +/- s.e.m. mass 89 +/- 7. g, total length 230 +/- 4. mm) achieved a U-crit of 2.1 +/- 1. body. lengths. (BL). s(-1) and an active metabolic rate (AMR) of 350 +/- 21. mg. kg(-1). h(-1), with 38 +/- 6% derived from air breathing. All of the knifefish exhibited a significant increase in air-breathing frequency (f(AB)) with swimming speed. If denied access to air in normoxia, these individuals achieved a U-crit of 2.0 +/- 0.2. BL. s(-1) and an AMR of 368 +/- 24. mg. kg(-1). h(-1) by gill ventilation alone. In normoxia, therefore, the contribution of air breathing to scope and exercise was entirely facultative. In aquatic hypoxia (P-O2=4. kPa) with access to normoxic air, the knifefish achieved a U-crit of 2.0 +/- 0.1. BL. s(-1) and an AMR of 338 +/- 29. mg. kg(-1). h(-1), similar to aquatic normoxia, but with 55 +/- 5% of AMR derived from air breathing. Indeed, f(AB) was higher than in normoxia at all swimming speeds, with a profound exponential increase during exercise. If the knifefish were denied access to air in hypoxia, U-crit declined to 1.2 +/- 0.1. BL. s(-1) and AMR declined to 199 +/- 29. mg. kg(-1). h(-1). Therefore, air breathing allowed the knifefish to avoid limitations to aerobic scope and exercise performance in aquatic hypoxia.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 904
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