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Auteur (up) Jourdan-Pineau, H.; Dupont-Prinet, A.; Claireaux, G.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre An Investigation of Metabolic Prioritization in the European Sea Bass, Dicentrarchus labrax Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Physiol. Biochem. Zool.
Volume 83 Numéro 1 Pages 68-77
Mots-Clés Hypoxia; blood-flow; cardiac-performance; dynamic action; largemouth bass; oxygen-consumption; respiratory metabolism; salmo-gairdneri; swimming performance; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé We investigated the ability of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to respond simultaneously to the metabolic demands of specific dynamic action (SDA) and aerobic exercise and how this was influenced by moderate hypoxia (50% air saturation). At 3 h after feeding in normoxia at 20 degrees C, SDA raised the instantaneous oxygen uptake (Mo(2)) of sea bass by 47% +/- 18% (mean +/- SEM, N = 7) above their standard metabolic rate (SMR) when fasted. This metabolic load was sustained throughout an incremental exercise protocol until fatigue, with a 14% +/- 3% increase in their maximum aerobic metabolic rate (MMR) relative to their fasted rate. Their incremental critical swimming speed (U(crit)) did not differ between fasted and fed states. Thus, in normoxia, the bass were able to meet the combined oxygen demands of SDA and aerobic exercise. In hypoxia, the sea bass suffered a significant decline in MMR and U(crit) relative to their normoxic performance. The SDA response was similar to normoxia (84% +/- 24% above fasted SMR at 3 h after feeding), but although this load was sustained at low swimming speeds, it gradually disappeared as swimming speed increased. As a result, the hypoxic sea bass exhibited no difference in their fasted versus fed MMR. Hypoxic U(crit) did not, however, differ between fasted and fed states, indicating that the sea bass deferred their SDA to maintain exercise performance. The results demonstrate that, in normoxia, the sea bass possesses excess cardiorespiratory capacity beyond that required for maximal aerobic exercise. The excess capacity is lost when oxygen availability is limited in hypoxia, and, under these conditions, the sea bass prioritize exercise performance. Thus, environmental conditions (oxygen availability) had a significant effect on patterns of oxygen allocation in sea bass and revealed intrinsic prioritization among conflicting metabolic demands.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1522-2152 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 436
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Auteur (up) Larsen, B.K.; Skov, P.V.; McKenzie, D.J.; Jokumsen, A.
Titre The effects of stocking density and low level sustained exercise on the energetic efficiency of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared at 19 degrees C Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture
Volume 324 Numéro Pages 226-233
Mots-Clés Energetic budget; Rainbow trout; Rearing density; Routine metabolic rate; Schooling behaviour; Sustained exercise; Welfare; cardiorespiratory performance; charr salvelinus-alpinus; feeding-behavior; fish welfare; food-intake; juvenile arctic charr; oxygen-consumption; physiology; respiratory; salmon salmo-salar; seasonal temperature
Résumé A 9 week growth trial was performed at two rearing densities; low (similar to 25 kg m(-3)) and high (similar to 100 kg m-3), in combination with either static water or a water current corresponding to 0.9 body lengths s(-1), to investigate the effects of density and exercise on the bioenergetics of rainbow trout reared at 19 degrees C, particularly routine metabolic rate (RMR), specific growth rate (SGR), and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The growth trial showed that high rearing density resulted in significantly lower SGR and increased FCR, with no significant alleviating effects of a water current, although slight improvement in both parameters were observed at low density. A significant linear relationship between SGR and FCR suggested that increased energy expenditure was the primary cause of reduced growth. Hourly measurements of instantaneous oxygen uptake, during a period of similar growth (200-350 g), revealed clear effects of the experimental conditions. Energetic budgets were calculated from feed intake and routine metabolic rate (RMR) and revealed that whilst feed intake was similar for all groups, a higher RMR in the high density groups resulted in a higher daily rate of energy utilization for routine activity, leading to slower growth. However, a lower RMR in fish subjected to a current resulted in a greater proportion of energy being retained, leading to significantly higher SGR for the selected period, at both low and high density. Furthermore, the presence of a water current was observed to induce schooling behaviour, which is known to reduce aggression and stress. It is thereby likely that the presence of a current had a positive effect on welfare in addition to its effect on energy metabolism. We conclude that the presence of a water current to some extent could alleviate the negative effects of high density at 19 degrees C, a relatively high temperature experienced in farming of rainbow trout during hot seasons. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 905
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Auteur (up) Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E.
Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459
Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis
Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169
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Auteur (up) Richard, M.; Bourreau, J.; Montagnani, C.; Ouisse, V.; Le Gall, P.; Fortune, M.; Munaron, D.; Messiaen, G.; Callier, M.D.; Roque d'Orbcastel, E.
Titre Influence of OSHV-1 oyster mortality episode on dissolved inorganic fluxes: An ex situ experiment at the individual scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture
Volume 475 Numéro Pages 40-51
Mots-Clés carrying-capacity; Crassostrea gigas; crassostrea-gigas spat; eastern oyster; juvenile; la-madeleine quebec; mediterranean thau lagoon; Mineralisation; mortality; mussel mytilus-edulis; mu-var; Nutrient fluxes; Ostreid herpesvirus 1; ostreid herpesvirus-1 infection; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption rates; pacific oysters; Spat
Résumé Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 mu var) infection has caused significant mortalities in juvenile oysters (Crassostrea gigas). In contrast to the practices of other animal production industries, sick and dead oysters are not separated from live ones and are left to decay in the surrounding environment, with unknown consequences on fluxes of dissolved materials. A laboratory approach was used in this study to test the influence of oyster mortality episode on dissolved inorganic fluxes at the oyster interface, dissociating (i) the effect of viral infection on metabolism of juvenile oysters and (ii) the effect of flesh decomposition on oxygen consumption and nutrient releases at the individual scale. Nine batches of juvenile oysters (Individual Total wet weight 1 g) were infected via injection of OsHV-1 enriched inoculums at different viral loads (108 and 109 OsHV-1 DNA copies per oyster) to explore infection thresholds. Oysters injected with filtered seawater were used as controls (C). Oysters were maintained under standard conditions to avoid stress linked to hypoxia, starvation, or ammonia excess. Before, after the injection and during the mortality episode, i.e. at days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14, nine oysters per treatment were incubated in individual metabolic chambers to quantify oxygen, ammonium and phosphate fluxes at the seawater-oyster interface. Nine empty chambers served as a reference. Injections of the two viral loads of OsHV-1 induced similar mortality rates (38%), beginning at day 3 and lasting until day 14. The observed mortality kinetics were slower than those reported in previous experimental pathology studies, but comparable to those observed in the field (Thau lagoon, France). This study highlights that oxygen and nutrient fluxes significantly varied during mortality episode. Indeed (i) OsHV-1 infection firstly modifies oyster metabolism, with significant decreases in oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion, and (ii) dead oysters lead to a strong increase of ammonium (6 fold) and phosphate (41 fold) fluxes and a decrease in the N/P ratio due to mineralisation of their flesh. The latter may modify the structure of the planktonic community in the field during mortality episode. This study is a first step of the MORTAFLUX program. The second step was to in situ confirm this abnormal nutrient loading during a mortality episode and show its impact on bacterio-, phyto-and protozoo-plankton. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2149
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Auteur (up) Rind, K.; Rodriguez-Barucg, Q.; Nicolas, D.; Cucchi, P.; Lignot, J.-H.
Titre Morphological and physiological traits of Mediterranean sticklebacks living in the Camargue wetland (Rhone river delta) Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés 3-spined stickleback; ecological causes; Gasterosteus aculeatus; gasterosteus-aculeatus l; gill rakers; ion regulation; k+-atpase activity; morphometry; na+/k+-atpase; NKA activity; osmoregulation; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; pelvic reduction; plate morph evolution; salinity; stickleback; threespine stickleback
Résumé Three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) living at the southern limit of the species distribution range could possess specific morphological and physiological traits that enable these fish to live at the threshold of their physiological capacities. Morphological analysis was carried out on samples of sticklebacks living in different saline habitats of the Camargue area (Rhone delta, northern Mediterranean coast) obtained from 1993 to 2017. Salinity acclimation capacities were also investigated using individuals from freshwater-low salinity drainage canals and from mesohaline-euryhaline lagoons. Fish were maintained in laboratory conditions at salinity values close to those of their respective habitats: low salinity (LS, 5 parts per thousand) or seawater (SW, 30 parts per thousand). Fish obtained from a mesohaline brackish water lagoon (BW, 15 parts per thousand) were acclimated to SW or LS. Oxygen consumption rates and branchial Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity (indicator of fish osmoregulatory capacity) were measured in these LS or SW control fish and in individuals subjected to abrupt SW or LS transfers. At all the studied locations, only the low-plated “leiurus” morphotype showed no spatial or temporal variations in their body morphology. Gill rakers were only longer and denser in fish sampled from the LS-freshwater (FW) drainage canals. All fish presented similar physiological capacities. Oxygen consumption rates were not influenced by salinity challenge except in SW fish transferred to LS immediately and 1 h after transfer. However, and as expected, gill NKA activity was salinity dependent. Sticklebacks of the Camargue area sampled from habitats with contrasted saline conditions are homogenously euryhaline, have low oxygen consumption rates and do not appear to experience significantly greater metabolic costs when challenged with salinity. However, an observed difference in gill raker length and density is most probably related to the nutritional condition of their habitat, indicating that individuals can rapidly acclimatize to different diets.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000526005600001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2770
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