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Auteur Chevrinais, M.; Jacquet, C.; Cloutier, R. doi  openurl
  Titre Early establishment of vertebrate trophic interactions: Food web structure in Middle to Late Devonian fish assemblages with exceptional fossilization Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Bull. Geosci.  
  Volume 92 Numéro 4 Pages 491-510  
  Mots-Clés north-america; bottom-up; body-size; predator; top-down; bottom-up control; coordinated stasis; Devonian; digestive contents; ecomorphology; escuminac formation; foraging ecology; fossil fish; fossil record; pahteoecology; prey size relationships; top-down control  
  Résumé In past and present ecosystems, trophic interactions determine material and energy transfers among species, regulating population dynamics and community stability. Food web studies in past ecosystems are helpful to assess the persistence of ecosystem structure throughout geological times and to explore the existence of general principles of food web assembly. We determined and compared the trophic structure of two Devonian fish assemblages [(1) the Escuminac assemblage (ca. 380 Ma), Miguasha, eastern Canada and (2) the Lode assemblage (ca. 390 Ma), Straupe, Latvia] with a closer look at the Escuminac assemblage. Both localities are representative of Middle to Late Devonian aquatic vertebrate assemblages in terms of taxonomic richness (ca. 20 species), phylogenetic diversity (all major groups of lower vertebrates) and palaeoenvironment (palaeoestuaries). Fossil food web structures were assessed using different kinds of direct (i.e. digestive contents and bite marks in fossils) and indirect (e.g. ecomoiphological measurements, stratigraphic species co-occurrences) indicators. First, the relationships between predator and prey body size established for the Escuminac fishes are comparable to those of recent aquatic ecosystems, highlighting a consistency of aquatic food web structure across geological time. Second, non-metric dimensional scaling on ecomorphological variables and cluster analysis showed a common pattern of functional groups for both fish assemblages; top predators, predators, primary and secondary consumers were identified. We conclude that Devonian communities were organized in multiple trophic levels and that size-based feeding interactions were established early in vertebrate history.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1214-1119 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2251  
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Auteur Dias, M.S.; Oberdorff, T.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Jezequel, C.; Cornu, J.F.; Brosse, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Tedesco, P.A. url  doi
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  Titre Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1130-1140  
  Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; Biogeography; Quaternary climate changes; africa; climate changes; contemporary; diversity patterns; endemism; evolution; freshwater fish; global; history; north-america; richness; river systems; scale; sea-level changes; species turnover; species-richness  
  Résumé The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 631  
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Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Biogeography of freshwater fishes of the Balkan Peninsula Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia  
  Volume 738 Numéro 1 Pages 205-220  
  Mots-Clés Balkan Peninsula; Beta diversity; Bioregionalisation; Conservation biogeography; Vulnerability; ancient lakes; biodiversity conservation; endemism; freshwater fish; global patterns; mitochondrial-dna sequences; north-america; phylogeography; species richness  
  Résumé Delineating biogeographical regions is a critical step towards the establishment and evaluation of conservation priorities. In the present study, we analysed the distribution patterns of the freshwater fish of an understudied European biodiversity hotspot, the Balkan Peninsula. Based on the most extensive available database of native freshwater fish species distributions, we performed a hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the major biogeographical regions of the Balkan Peninsula. We also highlighted the 'hottest hotspots' of freshwater fish diversity across the delimited biogeographical regions by describing the patterns of species richness, endemic and vulnerable species; indicator species were also determined. The bioregionalisation scheme consisted of eight groups of drainage basins that correspond to distinct regions of the Balkan Peninsula. Overall, the delineated biogeographical regions varied in terms of species richness, endemism, vulnerability (i.e. extinction threats) and indicator species composition. From a conservation perspective, this study emphasises the prioritisation of areas characterised by high levels of irreplaceability (endemism) and vulnerability (i.e. the Attikobeotia region, Ionian Sea and Prespa Lakes) and stresses the necessity of implementing a network of protected freshwater areas across the Balkan Peninsula.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 454  
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