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Auteur Heerah, K.; Cox, S.L.; Blevin, P.; Guinet, C.; Charrassin, J.-B. doi  openurl
  Titre Validation of Dive Foraging Indices Using Archived and Transmitted Acceleration Data: The Case of the Weddell Seal Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Frontiers In Ecology And Evolution  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés diving behavior; foraging; biologging; accelerometers; movement ecology; satellite relayed data logger; sea-ice  
  Résumé Dive data collected from archival and satellite tags can provide valuable information on foraging activity via the characterization of movement patterns (e.g., wiggles, hunting time). However, a lack of validation limits interpretation of what these metrics truly represent in terms of behavior and how predators interact with prey. Head-mounted accelerometers have proven to be effective for detecting prey catch attempt (PrCA) behaviors, and thus can provide a more direct measure of foraging activity. However, device retrieval is typically required to access the high-resolution data they record, restricting use to animals returning to predictable locations. In this study, we present and validate data obtained from newly developed satellite-relay data tags, capable of remotely transmitting summaries of tri-axial accelerometer measurements. We then use these summaries to assess foraging metrics generated from dive data only. Tags were deployed on four female Weddell seals in November 2014 at Dumont d'Urville, and successfully acquired data over similar to 2 months. Retrieved archival data for one individual, and transmitted data for four individuals were used to (1) compare and validate abstracted accelerometer transmissions against outputs from established processing procedures, and (2) assess the validity of previously developed dive foraging indices, calculated solely from time-depth measurements. We found transmitted estimates of PrCA behaviors were generally comparable to those obtained from archival processing, although a small but consistent over-estimation was noted. Following this, dive foraging segments were identified either from (1) sinuosity in the trajectories of high-resolution depth archives, or (2) vertical speeds between low resolution transmissions of key depth inflection points along a dive profile. In both cases, more than 93% of the estimated PrCA behaviors (from either abstracted transmissions or archival processing) fell into inferred dive foraging segments (i.e., “hunting” segments), suggesting the two methods provide a reliable indicator of foraging effort. The validation of transmitted acceleration data and foraging indices derived fromtime-depth recordings for Weddell seals offers new avenues for the study of foraging activity and dive energetics. This is especially pertinent for species from which tag retrieval is challenging, but also for the post-processing of the numerous low-resolution dive datasets already available.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-701x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2590  
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Auteur Cruaud, P.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Papot, C.; Le Baut, J.; Vigneron, A.; Khripounoff, A.; Gayet, N.; Cathalot, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Pignet, P.; Godfroy, A.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep-sea clams Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Evol. Persp.  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages e12541  
  Mots-Clés calyptogena-magnifica; chemoautotrophic bacteria; cold seeps; community structure; deep-sea ecosystems; evolutionary relationships; guaymas basin; Guaymas Basin; gulf-of-california; hydrothermal vent clam; macrofaunal communities; marine ecology; pliocardinae bivalve; sulfide-rich sediments; sulfur storage; vesicomyid movements  
  Résumé This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve-symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on-site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000472949800006 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2605  
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Auteur Queiroz, N.; Humphries, N.E.; Couto, A.; Vedor, M.; da Costa, I.; Sequeira, A.M.M.; Mucientes, G.; Santos, A.M.; Abascal, F.J.; Abercrombie, D.L.; Abrantes, K.; Acuna-Marrero, D.; Afonso, A.S.; Afonso, P.; Anders, D.; Araujo, G.; Arauz, R.; Bach, P.; Barnett, A.; Bernal, D.; Berumen, M.L.; Lion, S.B.; Bezerra, N.P.A.; Blaison, A.V.; Block, B.A.; Bond, M.E.; Bonfil, R.; Bradford, R.W.; Braun, C.D.; Brooks, E.J.; Brooks, A.; Brown, J.; Bruce, B.D.; Byrne, M.E.; Campana, S.E.; Carlisle, A.B.; Chapman, D.D.; Chapple, T.K.; Chisholm, J.; Clarke, C.R.; Clua, E.G.; Cochran, J.E.M.; Crochelet, E.C.; Dagorn, L.; Daly, R.; Cortes, D.D.; Doyle, T.K.; Drew, M.; Duffy, C.A.J.; Erikson, T.; Espinoza, E.; Ferreira, L.C.; Ferretti, F.; Filmalter, J.D.; Fischer, G.C.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Fontes, J.; Forget, F.; Fowler, M.; Francis, M.P.; Gallagher, A.J.; Gennari, E.; Goldsworthy, S.D.; Gollock, M.J.; Green, J.R.; Gustafson, J.A.; Guttridge, T.L.; Guzman, H.M.; Hammerschlag, N.; Harman, L.; Hazin, F.H.V.; Heard, M.; Hearn, A.R.; Holdsworth, J.C.; Holmes, B.J.; Howey, L.A.; Hoyos, M.; Hueter, R.E.; Hussey, N.E.; Huveneers, C.; Irion, D.T.; Jacoby, D.M.P.; Jewell, O.J.D.; Johnson, R.; Jordan, L.K.B.; Jorgensen, S.J.; Joyce, W.; Daly, C.A.K.; Ketchum, J.T.; Klimley, A.P.; Kock, A.A.; Koen, P.; Ladino, F.; Lana, F.O.; Lea, J.S.E.; Llewellyn, F.; Lyon, W.S.; MacDonnell, A.; Macena, B.C.L.; Marshall, H.; McAllister, J.D.; McAuley, R.; Meyer, M.A.; Morris, J.J.; Nelson, E.R.; Papastamatiou, Y.P.; Patterson, T.A.; Penaherrera-Palma, C.; Pepperell, J.G.; Pierce, S.J.; Poisson, F.; Quintero, L.M.; Richardson, A.J.; Rogers, P.J.; Rohner, C.A.; Rowat, D.R.L.; Samoilys, M.; Semmens, J.M.; Sheaves, M.; Shillinger, G.; Shivji, M.; Singh, S.; Skomal, G.B.; Smale, M.J.; Snyders, L.B.; Soler, G.; Soria, M.; Stehfest, K.M.; Stevens, J.D.; Thorrold, S.R.; Tolotti, M.T.; Towner, A.; Travassos, P.; Tyminski, J.P.; Vandeperre, F.; Vaudo, J.J.; Watanabe, Y.Y.; Weber, S.B.; Wetherbee, B.M.; White, T.D.; Williams, S.; Zarate, P.M.; Harcourt, R.; Hays, G.C.; Meekan, M.G.; Thums, M.; Irigoien, X.; Eguiluz, V.M.; Duarte, C.M.; Sousa, L.L.; Simpson, S.J.; Southall, E.J.; Sims, D.W. doi  openurl
  Titre Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Nature  
  Volume 572 Numéro 7770 Pages 461-+  
  Mots-Clés bycatch; conservation; geolocation; improving light; model; movements; patterns; pelagic sharks; temperature; tracking  
  Résumé Effective ocean management and the conservation of highly migratory species depend on resolving the overlap between animal movements and distributions, and fishing effort. However, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach that combines satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of the mean monthly space used by sharks falls under the footprint of pelagic longline fisheries. Space-use hotspots of commercially valuable sharks and of internationally protected species had the highest overlap with longlines (up to 76% and 64%, respectively), and were also associated with significant increases in fishing effort. We conclude that pelagic sharks have limited spatial refuge from current levels of fishing effort in marine areas beyond national jurisdictions (the high seas). Our results demonstrate an urgent need for conservation and management measures at high-seas hotspots of shark space use, and highlight the potential of simultaneous satellite surveillance of megafauna and fishers as a tool for near-real-time, dynamic management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000482219600033 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2614  
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Auteur Dalleau, M.; Kramer-Schadt, S.; Gangat, Y.; Bourjea, J.; Lajoie, G.; Grimm, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modeling the emergence of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots of the green sea turtle Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aldabra atoll; chelonia-mydas; connectivity; corridors; individual-based model; leatherback turtles; marine turtles; migration; movement; penghu archipelago; population-dynamics; remigration intervals; satellite-tracking; sea turtle; wan-an island  
  Résumé Environmental factors shape the spatial distribution and dynamics of populations. Understanding how these factors interact with movement behavior is critical for efficient conservation, in particular for migratory species. Adult female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, migrate between foraging and nesting sites that are generally separated by thousands of kilometers. As an emblematic endangered species, green turtles have been intensively studied, with a focus on nesting, migration, and foraging. Nevertheless, few attempts integrated these behaviors and their trade-offs by considering the spatial configurations of foraging and nesting grounds as well as environmental heterogeneity like oceanic currents and food distribution. We developed an individual-based model to investigate the impact of local environmental conditions on emerging migratory corridors and reproductive output and to thereby identify conservation priority sites. The model integrates movement, nesting, and foraging behavior. Despite being largely conceptual, the model captured realistic movement patterns which confirm field studies. The spatial distribution of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots was mostly constrained by features of the regional landscape, such as nesting site locations, distribution of feeding patches, and oceanic currents. These constraints also explained the mixing patterns in regional forager communities. By implementing alternative decision strategies of the turtles, we found that foraging site fidelity and nesting investment, two characteristics of green turtles' biology, are favorable strategies under unpredictable environmental conditions affecting their habitats. Based on our results, we propose specific guidelines for the regional conservation of green turtles as well as future research suggestions advancing spatial ecology of sea turtles. Being implemented in an easy to learn open-source software, our model can coevolve with the collection and analysis of new data on energy budget and movement into a generic tool for sea turtle research and conservation. Our modeling approach could also be useful for supporting the conservation of other migratory marine animals.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000481747800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2621  
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Auteur Kadar, J.; Ladds, M.; Mourier, J.; Day, J.; Brown, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Acoustic accelerometry reveals diel activity patterns in premigratory Port Jackson sharks Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés accelerometer; activity budgets; activity pattern; behavior; diel cycle; habitat; heterodontus-portusjacksoni; lobsters; migratory restlessness; movement; Port Jackson shark; reef sharks; regression; root mean square acceleration; vertical migrations; wild  
  Résumé Distinguishing the factors that influence activity within a species advances understanding of their behavior and ecology. Continuous observation in the marine environment is not feasible but biotelemetry devices provide an opportunity for detailed analysis of movements and activity patterns. This study investigated the detail that calibration of accelerometers measuring root mean square (RMS) acceleration with video footage can add to understanding the activity patterns of male and female Port Jackson sharks (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) in a captive environment. Linear regression was used to relate RMS acceleration output to time-matched behavior captured on video to quantify diel activity patterns. To validate captive data, diel patterns from captive sharks were compared with diel movement data from free-ranging sharks using passive acoustic tracking. The RMS acceleration data showed captive sharks exhibited nocturnal diel patterns peaking during the late evening before midnight and decreasing before sunrise. Correlation analysis revealed that captive animals displayed similar activity patterns to free-ranging sharks. The timing of wild shark departures for migration in the late breeding season corresponded with elevated diel activity at night within the captive individuals, suggesting a form of migratory restlessness in captivity. By directly relating RMS acceleration output to activity level, we show that sex, time of day, and sex-specific seasonal behavior all influenced activity levels. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that RMS acceleration data are a promising method to determine activity patterns of cryptic marine animals and can provide more detailed information when validated in captivity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000478172800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2623  
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